BS Completion in Managing Information Systems Courses

Our 36-credit BSMIS Core listed below will give you the knowledge and skills to execute and manage computer information systems as well as lead others in meeting the goals of your organization. From there you are welcome to chose electives that will best suit your career goals, whether that's more in the area of management or technology.

Course Descriptions

Bachelor's Completion

Required Courses

CIS310 - Computer Networks

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • This is a required course

Local area, wide area, and inter-networking concepts; an introduction to TCP/IP. Students will learn concepts, terminology, and platform basics.

CIS320 - Web Infrastructures

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring
  • This is a required course

This course focuses on the protocols and components of the Internet centered on the World Wide Web. The basic workings of web servers, browsers, HTTP, email, and DNS are discussed.

CIS330 - Introduction to Relational Databases

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall
  • This is a required course

An introduction to the relational model, basic relational database design, and some RDBMS operation. This includes an introduction to data modeling practices and some SQL.

CIS355 - Systems Analysis & Design

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Spring
  • This is a required course

Systems Analysis & Design covers the multiple phases and disciplines of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC). In this course, students will learn how to determine and define business processes, gather and synthesize requirements, analyze data flows, develop systems solutions and implement their work. All BSMIS students will take this course in their first trimester. 3 credits.

COM300 - Business Writing

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • This is a required course

Effective writing skills are among the most valuable to managers, particularly information systems managers, whose communications must be clear and concise. This course provides students with advanced business writing skills in memo, letter, report, analysis, and technical writing formats.

FIN300 - Finance

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring
  • This is a required course

Students will learn to analyze and evaluate an organization's financial strength, capacity, and value relative to its competitors through financial statement analysis. The class will then examine sources and uses of capital including the advantage and risks of leverage or equity investment. Students will learn techniques to compare and evaluate and compare competing capital investment opportunities and to project future capital needs. Finally, the class will examine the behavior of U.S. capital markets with a focus on evaluating investments in publicly traded debt, equity, and currency. Students will use Sharpe's capital asset pricing model to analyze the value of an equity investment and its anticipated risk-adjusted return and security valuation.

MGT300 - Management

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall
  • This is a required course

This course provides an overview of current management problems, challenges and opportunities. It provides exposure to management theories and offers students the ability to preview emerging management strategies. Special emphasis is placed on the role of modern knowledge worker management.

MGT310 - Project Management I

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall
  • This is a required course

In Project Management 1, students learn the Agile Project Management framework with an emphasis on planning. Starting from an organizations strategy, students learn how to develop the project road map, identify user roles, and write user stories. Additional topics include stakeholder identification, team development, release planning, value assignment, communication, quality, risk and change management.

MGT420 - Strategic Planning

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring
  • This is a required course

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate lessons from the disciplines of the program in an experience of organizational strategy and planning. The curriculum draw on an understanding of business, marketing, communication and persuasion, project management and technology as students examine the planning process through readings and a series of experiential projects. Exercises require students to develop a mission statement for an organization and communicate their vision to classmates and peers. The class will consider the traditional planning process of visioning, market analysis, capacity assessment, data gathering, dialogue, synthesis, and assessment. For a final project, students will author a persuasive strategic plan document that includes mission, vision, values, long-term objectives with supporting tactical plans, and a system for measuring success and periodic reassessment.

MIS490 - Capstone I: Planning

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Winter, Spring
  • This is a required course

Students enroll in Capstone I: Planning in their penultimate trimester. The course offers guidance and support as students plan their response to the problem or opportunity they have identified. Each student completes a project proposal in his or her own website with the support of others in the class, course faculty and their Program Director. Deliverables for this phase include: completion of a comprehensive project proposal document and the first two pages of students individual Capstone websites, and creation and delivery of an elevator pitch  a very brief statement that communicates their Capstone project.

Capstone involves both process and product. Students engage in the process of identifying a problem or opportunity, planning and carrying out a project, and reflecting on their learning. During the two-trimester process, students create products including a completed website, a project deliverable designed to solve the problem or address the opportunity, and an elevator pitch. There is a strong focus on ensuring an agile approach to planning and implementation and on clear, professional communication. Together process and product provide students with a deep learning experience during their last two trimesters at the Graduate School.

MIS491 - Capstone II: Implementing

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Winter, Spring
  • This is a required course

Students enroll in Capstone II: Implementing in their final trimester and complete their Capstone project thereby completing a key degree requirement. Supported by an Advisor, students: create the deliverable planned in Capstone I; deliver a formal presentation of his/her project; participate in a conversation about what they have learned doing the Capstone and their course of study; and submit their completed Capstone website, which includes a written Project Summary and Retrospective on Learning. Students Capstones are assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Capstone involves both process and product. Students engage in the process of identifying a problem or opportunity, planning and carrying out a project, and reflecting on their learning. During the two-trimester process, students create products including a completed website, a project deliverable designed to solve the problem or address the opportunity, and an elevator pitch. There is a strong focus on ensuring an agile approach to planning and implementation and on clear, professional communication. Together process and product provide students with a deep learning experience during their last two trimesters at the Graduate School.

MKT300 - Marketing

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • This is a required course

Marketing Management is the practice of planning and implementing the development, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and service to facilitate marketplace exchanges in support of organizational objectives. This course examines the marketing process from the strategic perspective of organizational management, with emphasis on the three-step process of analyzing the market, developing marketing strategies, and planning marketing programs. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of current trends in marketing, driven by Internet technologies and the globalization of commerce, into the traditional marketing framework.

Elective Courses

CIS326 - Website Design I

  • 3 credits

An introduction to the conceptual aspects of effective website design. Organization and presentation of information, navigation, site maps, and initial planning strategies are discussed in the context of designing a usable site. Includes basic XHTML and image manipulation.

CIS327 - Website Design II

  • 3 credits
  • Prerequisites: CIS326 Website Design I

A hands-on course expanding on CIS326 Website Design I, focusing primarily on the effective use of graphics and media on the World Wide Web. File formats and creation/editing tools are discussed, as well as elementary design concepts. Prerequisite: CIS326

CIS328 - Website Design III

  • 3 credits
  • Prerequisites: CIS327 Website Design II

The third course in a series introducing the principles of website design, focusing on the actual assembly of simple sites. Open source content management systems (CMS) are widely used by small businesses, non-profits, and other organizations. This course will teach you how to use an open source content management system such as Joomla! to build a complete website, including content, navigation, polls, calendars, and customized templates.
Prerequisite: CIS327

CIS340 - Web Application Development

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • Prerequisites: CIS330 Introduction to Relational Databases

Today, a "basic website" for even a small organization can include sophisticated interactivity; more and more, companies are putting some (if not all) of their business processes online. What is the basic architecture of these "web applications?" What technologies are available and what are their capabilities? The structure, design, and implementation of basic web applications is discussed in this course, defining and synthesizing the roles of browser, web server, database, and middleware. Prerequisites: CIS330

CIS360 - Human Computer Interaction

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall

As computing technologies become increasingly powerful and complex, the need for well-designed interfaces is now greater than ever. This course introduces the issues, theories, techniques, and tradeoffs of trying to design good user interfaces for a variety of system and user types.

CIS400 - Information Security

  • 3 credits
  • Prerequisites: CIS320 Web Infrastructures

A survey of security issues encountered when dealing with information systems, focusing primarily on Internet technologies. Topics such as encryption technologies, firewall abilities, and security policies are discussed. Prerequisite: CIS320

CIS430 - Database Administration

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring
  • Prerequisites: CIS330 Introduction to Relational Databases

A course covering the details of supporting relational database management systems (RDBMS) for enterprise applications. Physical database design, performance tuning, basic query optimization, backups and restorations, and user management are covered. Prerequisite: CIS330

COM400 - Persuasive Communication

  • 3 credits

This course presents an overview of effective public speaking skills, useful in practical situations such as moderating a meeting, presenting a new idea to senior management, and conducting training session in a group setting. Persuasive communication skills allow managers to achieve their goals more effectively. Prerequisite: COM300

MGT320 - Negotiations

  • 3 credits

Students in this course will study negotiations theories from a multi-disciplinary perspective, including psychology, management, and rhetoric. Students will frequently engage in simulated negotiations, honing their skills in a variety of settings.

MGT350 - IT Contracts

  • 3 credits

Information Managers handle a variety of contracts in their daily responsibilities. This course provides an overview of the various kinds of contracts MIS professionals encounter, and allows students an opportunity to analyze their significance. Particular emphasis is placed on vendor/outsource contract management techniques.

MGT400 - Managing with Technology

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall
  • Prerequisites: MGT300 Management

This course explores the issues and opportunities facing managers today. Students will survey the multiple expectations of IS managers and the skills required to manage an organization's software and technical infrastructure, information architecture and systems integration, e-commerce initiatives, technology procurement, software development and data security. Prerequisite: MGT300

MGT410 - Project Management II

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • Prerequisites: MGT310 Project Management I

In Project Management 2, students learn Agile Project Management techniques to successfully complete projects. Students will actually run the two-week cycles of a typical project sprint or iteration. Students learn how to quickly incorporate changes to project plans in order to constantly and consistently deliver business value. Specific topics include sprint planning, feature estimation, daily scrum, burndown charts and velocity, and retrospectives. Project Management 1 is recommended but not required.

MGT430 - IT Leadership

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • Prerequisites: MGT300 Management

This course examines the distinction between the science of management and the art of leadership. Leadership involves the ability to unite people around a shared vision, and facilitate the discovery of true internal motivation to think creatively and take considered risks in the quest for superior value and distinction. Students will read the current literature on leadership, review case studies of recognized business leaders, and examine their own experiences of leadership in their professional and personal lives.

MKT400 - Marketing and the Internet

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring
  • Prerequisites: MKT300 Marketing

Marketing and the Internet explores new trends and opportunities in marketing and emerging opportunities in wireless, short messaging systems and interactive television. Topics include the relative value, cost and fiscal/technical requirements of Internet advertising, online communities, portals, affiliate marketing, subscription models, email campaigns, online branding, data collection and mining, personalization, customer relationship management, automated and live customer service and multi-channel publishing. Prerequisite: MKT300