Online @ Marlboro and Find At Marlboro temporarily unavailable

Library Blog - July 1, 2014 - 10:33am

The library’s links to full text from Google Scholar (“Online @ Marlboro”), as well as the “Find At Marlboro” button in our databases (which lets you link to full text or request items via interlibrary loan), are both broken at the moment. We’re working on fixing the problem.

In the meantime, if you find an article and want to see whether you have access to it through Marlboro, just enter the journal title in our Journal Finder.

If it turns out that Marlboro does not have the article and you’d like to request it via interlibrary loan, then use the Interlibrary Loan Request Form.

You can also get in touch with the library any time; we’re happy to walk you through your options for getting the articles you need.

Sorry for any inconvenience!

This is just a test

Status Updates - May 31, 2014 - 8:58pm

Please ignore this post. We are testing our broadcast system.

Most Dangerous OP Trip EVER

Potash Phil - May 29, 2014 - 9:53am

Imagine a white-water rafting trip that ends calamitously with two participants suffering from hypothermia, one with a sprained ankle and howling like a coyote, one with a dislocated shoulder and broken wrist, and one mysteriously wedged between two trees with a broken leg that is grotesquely gushing blood. The only participant temporarily smart enough to escape injury is heating up cocoa for her friends when the stove blows up, leaving her with third-degree burns on her face. I know you’re thinking I have some whacky, morose imagination, and I do, but this would all be very easy to picture if you were part of the Wilderness First Responder training workshop taking place on campus this week.

Compound fractures, anaphylactic shock, heat exhaustion: you name it, you can find it in Marlboro’s verdant woods this week. Run by the Wilderness Medical Association, with support from our very own Outdoor Program, the weeklong WFR workshop is awesome training in first aid, leadership, and gory special effects for anyone who works in remote locations. A bumper crop of 21 outdoor educators, guides, and other kinds of nature-loving professionals are learning to splint, staunch, bandage, carry, and console outdoorsy victims in the most desperate straits. Seven participants are stalwart Marlboro students, preparing for their role as Bridges orientation trip leaders next fall.

Did I mention that one of the paddlers with hypothermia is also diabetic and not responding to treatment because he is in hypoglycemic shock? And the youth who brought the rescuers to the scene is breaking out in hives and having trouble breathing? I tell you, this is any trip leader’s worst nightmare, short of a zombie apocalypse, and these WFR trainees handle it all with the confidence and composure of seasoned first responders. I would put my compound fracture in any of their hands, as soon as I get over the impression that they are all a little accident-prone.

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Borrow Vermont State Parks and Vermont Historic Sites passes — free!

Library Blog - May 28, 2014 - 8:00pm

This summer you can borrow a free pass to Vermont State Parks or Vermont Historic Sites! Just ask at the Rice-Aron Library.

Each pass admits one vehicle holding up to eight people FREE to any Vermont State Park or Vermont Historic Site for one day.

Guidelines:

•    Passes may be checked out by current Marlboro College faculty, staff, and students, as well as residents of the Town of Marlboro and eligible alumni who have registered for borrowing privileges at the Rice-Aron Library.

•    Four (4) day check out. Passes are due back to the library by closing time 4 days from the date you borrow them (or, if they would be due back while the library is closed for the weekend, they must be returned by Monday morning).

•    The library’s summer hours are Monday-Thursday, 8:30 am – 4:30 pm. If you are returning a pass outside of those hours, please leave it in the book return bin located outside the entrance to the Aron (new) wing of the library, near the librarians’ offices.

•    No renewals are permitted.

•    Passes are available strictly on a first-come, first-served basis. You are welcome to check the catalog (link) or call (802-258-9221) to see if a pass is available, but we cannot hold it for you.

•    Fee for lost pass: $80.00 plus billing and processing fees.

Thanks to the Vermont Department of LibrariesVermont State Parks, and Vermont Division for Historic Preservation for making this program possible.

For more information about Vermont State Parks: http://www.vtstateparks.com/
103 South Main Street
Waterbury, Vermont 05671-0601
802-241-3655
(Got a smartphone? Check out the Vermont State Parks app for iOS or Android)

For more information about Vermont Historic Sites: http://historicsites.vermont.gov/
1 National Life Dr
Montpelier, Vt 05620
802-828-3080

For questions about using the pass, contact the Rice-Aron Library:
802-258-9221
library@marlboro.edu

The Nature of Art

Potash Phil - May 9, 2014 - 11:47am

Every so often, and this time of year actually quite often, I see a student’s Plan work and it literally blows my mind. I mean, not in the way black holes, metaphysics, jazz, restaurants that advertise “home-style cooking,” and other things I just don’t understand “blow my mind.” I’m talking about students that show so much more intellectual curiosity and integrity and maturity in their little pinky than I can muster with all my cerebral cylinders firing—certainly way more than I ever exhibited as a college student. This time it was two students who had particularly perceptive little pinkies exhibiting their art in Drury Gallery at the very same time, hence the blustered brain.

Katie Lyon did her Plan in biology and visual arts, especially exploring biomimicry and ecological design. She approaches art exactly like a brilliant scientist, with an attention to method that would make Francis Bacon do backflips, and the result is beautiful. Like, she did 100 awesome little sketches of zooplankton (above) collected as part of a semester at sea program. The object of the collection was to index species diversity, but Katie lovingly turned the result into something so much more colorful and rewarding. She also documented the first 36 galaxies in Charles Messier’s catalog (left), and then created, I’m not kidding, 36 bright colored cards that represented the numbers in the New General Catalog for each of these galaxies. I mean, I can hear my neurons boggling just thinking about it, and that’s before looking up at Katie’s ethereal, light-catching, sculptures hanging above, or her grid of paintings demonstrating a multivariate analysis of art movements, media, and seasons, oh my!

Ayla Mullen did her Plan in politics, especially environmental political thought, and ceramics. Her installation of a table set with finely crafted plates, each depicting beautiful vegetables, resting on a bed of green seedlings, was somewhere between Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party and Thoreau’s vegan dining room in heaven (right). Each setting was complemented with a “seed pot” a ceramic vessel with a tiny hole for safely storing seeds until the next season, when it is broken open like Mother Nature’s piggy bank. Ayla’s work is all about reconnecting with nature, and her own intimate understanding of this connection, displayed in eye-popping etchings, trunk-like ceramics, and delicate drawings of branches and leaves and pinecones on porcelain sconce lights, is enviable. Like Katie, Ayla has found a truly bodacious, artistic way to complement her other academic interests, in this case the challenges and rewards of ecological citizenship. With mind-blowing students like these, who needs black holes?

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