Van Trip to UMass Amherst Libraries, Sunday 10/5

Library Blog - September 30, 2014 - 3:02pm
Yes, that’s the library.

This Sunday, October 5th, the library is sponsoring a van trip to the UMass Amherst Libraries. Space is limited! Sign up on the sheet at the Library Research Bar.

The van will leave the Dining Hall at 11:30 am and return by 5:30 pm.

While at UMass, you can search their hundreds of databases and download or scan articles from their extensive journal holdings (e-journal list; library catalog). If you are a Massachusetts resident, you can get a library card and borrow books; if not, you can jot down any book titles that look useful and request them via Marlboro’s Interlibrary Loan service.

Beth and/or Amber are happy to meet with you this week to help you make the most of your 3 hours (roughly) at UMass. Stop by or email us to set up an appointment.

Celebrate Your Freedom to Read!

Library Blog - September 24, 2014 - 9:41am

September 21st to the 27th is Banned Books Week, an annual event which highlights the value of free and open access to information. Every year, thousands of books are targeted for removal or restrictions in libraries and schools, and while books do continue to be banned, the majority of the titles remain available. This is in large part to the efforts of teachers, librarians, students, and community members who speak out for the freedom to read.

Certain titles have become perennial favorites as the targets of banning efforts, including Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. More recently, titles such as The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, have been challenged.

For more information on banned and challenged books, The American Library Association has developed a timeline celebrating three decades of liberating literature, and the Huffington Post has created a series of infographics on banned books in the United States.

Help Us Select Items for the David Pierce Fund

Library Blog - September 22, 2014 - 2:59pm

David Pierce was a Marlboro College student whose death on October 1, 2003, shocked and saddened the entire community. Many on campus still have fond memories of David, and a bench and apple tree outside of the library commemorate his life and time at Marlboro.

David’s family established a fund for the library to purchase items that are not necessarily for academic purposes, but rather for fun. Think graphic novels, current popular fiction, movies, TV series, etc.

Each year, the library buys a few more items using the fund established in his memory. This year, we are asking for your help in choosing what to buy.

Between now and 8:30 am on Monday, 9/29, email library@marlboro.edu (or call, or stop by, or comment below…) with the titles of any movies, books, graphic novels, or other items you’d like the library to add. Remember: fun, not work (though the two aren’t always mutually exclusive!).

We’ll make a list of all your suggestions, then put them to a vote. Students will be emailed a link to a survey; voting will be open through the end of the day on Wednesday, October 1st. When voting is over, we’ll rank the selections, start buying with the top vote-getter, and continue down the list as far as we can.

In the meantime, stop by the library to see some of the items that have been bought with David’s fund in past years. They’ll be on display starting next week on the entrance level, across from the Service Desk. You can also find them in the library catalog, tagged with “David Pierce Fund.”

Beth Ruane
Library Director

Better Living Through Zotero: Meet with a librarian for tailored help

Library Blog - September 19, 2014 - 11:08am

Zotero is a useful (and free!) tool that can help you manage and format citations as you research and write. No longer just for Firefox, Zotero now works with most browsers, operating systems, and word processing platforms.

You can…

  • Capture and keep citations and links to books and articles as you come across them;
  • Organize your citations into folders for different classes or projects;
  • Format citations in any of dozens of formats (including APA, Chicago, and MLA) with just a few clicks;
  • Insert citations in your paper as you write and have them formatted automatically;
  • Sync your Zotero library across computers;
  • Create group libraries to share citations.

On three upcoming weekend days, librarians will offer individual meetings to help you get the most out of Zotero.

To get going with Zotero, or become a power user, sign up for 15 minutes of individual help (Marlboro login required to sign-up) at the Research Bar during the following times:

  • Sunday, September 28th, 2-4 p.m. with Amber
  • Saturday, October 11th, 10-11:30 a.m with Beth
  • Sunday, October 12, 2-4 p.m. with Beth

If you can’t make any of those times, Beth and Amber are also available for one-on-one Zotero help at other times; just stop by the desk or email us to set up a time.

Constitution Day Read-In

Library Blog - September 12, 2014 - 11:37am

Each year on September 17th, we celebrate Constitution Day to commemorate the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. Among the many freedoms the Constitution guarantees, we’re partial to the First Amendment, which protects the freedom of speech. Libraries are strong advocates of the principle of the freedom to read, supporting the concept that a vital democratic society depends on unfettered access to ideas.

Please join us on this September 17th (Wednesday) for a Constitution Day Read-In, and exercise your right to read what you please! Starting at 9am, this 24 hour event will be held in the Reference Room; comfy seating and “questionable” books will be provided. Open to all, participants are invited to come in and peruse a selection of books that have been banned or challenged. Read from an old favorite, or explore a new title!

Students Thrash Faculty

Potash Phil - September 9, 2014 - 2:13pm

It’s that time of year again, the bright dawn of an awesome new semester at Marlboro, and I’m not talking about any old convocation, or registering for classes, or the first yummy community dinner. I’m talking about that most august of September rituals known as the students vs. faculty/staff softball game. That breathtaking event where community members put aside their Dostoevsky and their vector fields and their epistemological solipsism to pit their lofty brains against six ounces of kapok stuffing.

In case you didn’t know, Princeton Review ranks Marlboro as #18 among colleges for “Nobody Plays Intramural Sports,” and a whopping #10 for “There’s a Game?” When it is not broomball season, the pinnacle of Marlboro sportsmanship, most students prefer to get their exercise hiking up to the science building or seeing how many can fit on the OP stone bench. But somehow these particular students didn’t get that memo, because they turned out the most fearsome and strapping team of softball ringers that had ever pummeled a ball on Person’s field.

At least, that’s my feeble explanation for the resounding defeat of the faculty/staff team, with a final score of 8 to 20-or-30-something. John “physical capital” Rush, Marlboro’s new economics professor took a productive turn on the mound, but could not exert a normative influence on the supply of (or demand for) soaring hits by the students. Philosophy professor William “epistemology” Edelglass led the team with a competitive edge that would have made Emmanuel Kant blush, and chemistry professor Todd “kinetic energy” Smith made his mark with a three-run homer that had everyone’s electrons excited for a moment. But the faculty/staff team never quite rose to the students’ challenge, despite an generous allowance of extra outs and the rousing solo cheerleading of Kathy “pom-pom” Waters, alumni director. There’s always next year.

Categories:

Huzzah! It’s That Time of Year Again!

Library Blog - August 29, 2014 - 3:37pm

Welcome, new students, staff, and faculty, and welcome back, to those returning! We’re so excited to see the campus teeming with life once again! We’ll open for the Fall semester on Sunday, August 31st at 12:30 pm and look forward to seeing new students with their peer advisor groups on Sunday from 1-3 pm.

You probably know that once the library opens for the semester, we’re open 24/7 right up to Winter Break. You can come in, study, socialize, borrow/return books, work/print/scan/copy in the computer lab, or do whatever else you wish (subject to the College Handbook and the Library Honor Code, of course) whenever it tickles your fancy.

There are certain things, though, that you can only do when staff are on duty. These include: borrowing reserve readings; borrowing DVDs; picking up holds or interlibrary loans; and getting into the Plan Room.

Staffing will be a little atypical during the first couple days of the semester:

  • Sunday, 9/1: 12:30 pm – 5:30 pm
  • Monday, 9/2: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Thereafter, our normal staffing schedule will be in effect:

  • Sundays: 12:30 pm – 5:30 pm; 6:30 pm – 11:00 pm
  • Mondays-Thursdays: 8:30 am – 5:30 pm; 6:30 pm – 11:00 pm
  • Fridays: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

We’ll always list changes to our schedule — building or staffing — on this blog, in the Town Crier, and on the library’s Facebook page and Twitter feed. If you ever have questions (about hours, staffing, or really, anything at all!), please stop by, email us (library@marlboro.edu), or call x221 (802-258-9221).

We are looking forward to working with you this year!

Beth Ruane
Library Director

Online @ Marlboro and Find At Marlboro temporarily unavailable

Library Blog - July 1, 2014 - 10:33am

The library’s links to full text from Google Scholar (“Online @ Marlboro”), as well as the “Find At Marlboro” button in our databases (which lets you link to full text or request items via interlibrary loan), are both broken at the moment. We’re working on fixing the problem.

In the meantime, if you find an article and want to see whether you have access to it through Marlboro, just enter the journal title in our Journal Finder.

If it turns out that Marlboro does not have the article and you’d like to request it via interlibrary loan, then use the Interlibrary Loan Request Form.

You can also get in touch with the library any time; we’re happy to walk you through your options for getting the articles you need.

Sorry for any inconvenience!