Marlboro College

News Events at Marlboro

Events are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.

Music for a Sunday Afternoon

Music for a Sunday Afternoon

Concert by Renana Gutman and Yoojin Jang
Sunday, April 20, 3:00 pm • Ragle Hall, Serkin Center

Music for a Sunday Afternoon favorite Renana Gutman will be joined by young Korean violinist Yoojin Jang, who is quickly building an international reputation as one of the new generation’s brightest string virtuosi. Praised for her commanding technique, conviction, and stage presence, Yoojin has won many prizes, including first prize at Japan’s Munetsugu Angel International Violin Competition. Pianist Renana Gutman has performed across three continents as an orchestral soloist, recitalist, and collaborative artist praised by the New York Sun for the “true poetry in her phrasing.” Together they will present John Corigliano's Sonata for Violin and Piano, Karol Szymanowski's Mythes, op. 30, and Beethoven's Violin Sonata no. 10 in G major, op. 96.

Fling (Swish) Tumble → Sail

Fling (Swish) Tumble → Sail

Dance choreographed by Hannah Ruth Brothers
Friday, April 25, 7:30 pm, and Saturday, April 26, 4:00 pm • Dance Studio, Serkin Center

A kinetic exploration of momentum through choreography and improvisation, this evening of dance features movement choreographed and arranged by senior Hannah Ruth Brothers as part of her Plan of Concentration. Drawing from the vocabularies of postmodern dance and contact improvisation, the concert will include a goofy duet, solo work, a performance from Marlboro’s contact improvisation group The Silver Stripes, and Landing, a piece for five dancers that investigates the art of becoming grounded.

Salut Y'all: African Teachers on the Bayou

Salut Y'all: African Teachers on the Bayou

Screening and discussion by Boukary Sawadogo
Monday, April 28, 4 pm • Apple Tree

Selected for the Africa World Documentary Film Festival, Salut Y’all profiles African educators teaching French in Louisiana. Marlboro French professor Boukary “Abou” Sawadogo made the film while in graduate school at the University of Louisiana, where he received his doctorate in Francaphone studies and a certificate in film production. As a scholar of West African film, author of the book Les Cinémas Francophones Ouest-Africains, Abou is uniquely suited to put his film in the context of French-speaking African nations and their diaspora.   

Promotional Materials

Promotional Materials

Dance Performance by Maia Talbot Holloway and Lulu Uihlein
Saturday, May 3, and Sunday, May 4, 8:00pm • Dance Studio, Serkin Center 

Promotional Materials is an evening of choreographic works examining the communication and miscommunication of selves through dance and multimedia performance. This body of work, part of the Plans of Concentration of Anna Lucia Uihlein and Maia Talbot Holloway, includes group pieces, solo pieces, and an installation, part dance and part performance art. 

Performing Identity

Performing Identity

Works-in-progress by students and renowned artist Deb Margolin
Monday, May 5, 7:00pm • Whittemore Theater

Deb Margolin, playwright and performance artist joins students from the performance seminar, Borders, Boundaries, and Crossing, for a show of solo works-in-progress. Rainbow Stakiwicz, Olivia Schaaf, John Marinelli, Peter Scibak, and Sophie Tulip will present their work developed in this seminar, co-taught by visiting artist Carmelita Tropicana and theater professor Brenda Foley. The class will collaborate with Deb Margolin, a Yale faculty member and founding member of Split Britches Theater Company, who has received an Obie Award for Sustained Excellence in Performance for her solo work. 

Rapid Reviews

Rapid Reviews

Book reviews by community members
Thursday, May 8, 3:00pm • Appletree

Come get some ideas for your summer reading list. Students Phoebe Lumley, Courtney Varga, and Matt Whalan, along with faculty member Kat Rickenbacker and staff members Emily Alling and Stephen Sirum, talk about their all-time favorite books, reviewing each one in a minute or less. You’ll be reminded of classics like Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austin and Catch-22 by Joseph Heller, and learn about non-fiction books like the National Audubon Society’s Field Guide to the Night Sky and Brian Raferty’s memoir Don’t Stop Believin: How Karaoke Conquered the World and Changed My Life, The offerings will include children’s books, books of poetry, and many recently published novels. Milk and homemade cookies will be served.

Giving Historical Subjects Agency: Korean Americans During WWII

Giving Historical Subjects Agency: Korean Americans During WWII

Talk by Lili Kim
Thursday, May 8, 7:00pm • Appletree

Historian Lili Kim is the author of the forthcoming book, Resisting the Orientalization of the Enemy: Korean Americans, World War II, and the Transnational Struggle for Justice on the Homefront (Stanford University Press). An associate professor of history and global migrations at Hampshire College, she is a scholar of Asian American history, women’s history, and immigration history. She will discuss the predicament faced by Korean Americans on the homefront during the Second World War.

Patterns of Parting: Berlin As a Collaborative Model

Patterns of Parting: Berlin As a Collaborative Model

Performance workshop
Thursday, May 8, 7:00 pm • Whittemore Theater

Students in the Berlin as Collaborative Model class, Sophie Tulip, Peter Scibak, John Marinelli, Olivia Schaaf, Sasha Lundina, and Marty Henzy, used the city of Berlin as locus and inspiration for the creation of performance pieces. Then these students incorporated their experiences collecting research materials in the city of Berlin itself during March break. The generative process is reflected in interdisciplinary performance pieces presented, employing film, song, soundscape, movement, and text.

Scraps

Scraps

Dance Performance by Katharine Roché-Sudar
Friday, May 9, 8:00pm and Saturday, May 10, 4:30pm • Rice-Aron Library

Choreographed by senior Katharine Roché-Sudar for her Plan of Concentration, Scraps is a modern interpretation of the Norwegian fairy tale “Tatterhood.” Traveling through the various rooms of Rice-Aron Library, Katherine will present a quartet, a duet, a group work, and a solo all focusing on the idea of sisterhood, journeys, and ever-evolving relationships in life.

 

Flooded

Flooded

Dance Performance by Sophia Romeri
Friday, May 9, 4:00pm and Saturday, May 10, 8:00pm • Dance Studio, Serkin Center

To Flow: To be completely absorbed in an activity with a feeling of receptive focus, full engagement, unselfconsciousness and enjoyment for the process. In Sophia Romeri's Plan performance, she attempts to cultivate a flow state from the beginning to the end of the piece. Obstacles and challenges arise, things inevitably change, but can she sustain an active flow of presence through the entire dance performance?

Senior Plan Shows in Drury Gallery

Senior Plan Shows in Drury Gallery

Permeable Landscape, a show by Pearse Pinch
Friday, April 11 to Monday, April 14
Reception Sunday, April 13, 4:00pm

Belong to the Place, a show by Zoe Holland
Wednesday, April 16 to Saturday, April 19
Reception Saturday, April 19, 5:00pm 

It Takes and Ocean, a show by Elisabeth Joffe
Thursday, May 1 to Sunday, May 4
Reception Friday, May 2, 3:30 to 6:00pm 

A Home in our Bodies, a show by Vivian Gay
Thursday, May 1 to Sunday, May 4 

Cocoons, a show by Kirsten Wiking
Sunday, May 11 to Wednesday, May 14
Reception Wednesday, May 14 at 4:00pm 

Wilderness First Responder Course

Weeklong training workshop
Thursday, May 22 to Thursday, May 29, 8:00am to 6:00pm • Dalrymple

The Wilderness First Responder program is the definitive wilderness course in medical training, leadership, and critical thinking for outdoor, low-resource, and remote professionals and leaders. This is the ideal medical training outdoor educators, guides, military, professional search and rescue teams, researchers, and those involved in disaster relief. The curriculum, run by the Wilderness Medical Association, is comprehensive and practical. It includes the essential principles and skills required to assess and manage medical problems in isolated and extreme environments for days and weeks if necessary. Cost $580—optional lunches an additional $80, and optional housing an additional $140 (dorm) or $60 (camping). Contact the Outdoor Program [op@marlboro.edu] for registration and details.

 

Marlboro College hosts many events that are open to the public throughout the year, including lectures, concerts and art exhibits. Events are free and open to the public, except where noted. Call the Events Hotline at 802-451-7151 for cancellation information and reservations. To receive notification of future events, send an email to our development office

Photos, Video and Audio taken by Marlboro College with permission of performer.

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