Marlboro’s art history curriculum is designed to introduce students to the complex web of skills and methods that art historians use as well as to excite students in the pleasure of critical seeing.

Art history is, by its nature, interdisciplinary. It uses the methods and practices of disciplines in the traditional humanities, such as history and literature, as well as a number of the social science disciplines including anthropology, sociology, political science, and, increasingly today, social geography. Marlboro’s art history curriculum is designed to introduce students to the complex web of skills and methods that art historians use as well as to excite students in the pleasure of critical seeing.

The curriculum is designed around four interlocking, cross-cultural themes that underpin much of the artistic production of many world cultures, from the ancient to the contemporary period. These themes are: Cities and People; Seeing and Imagining; Power and Empire; and, Gods and their Representations.

My own research into the painting and architecture of 13th- and 14th-century Italy combines the study of culture and art with a focus on its interaction with social and religious practice. Although I am a medievalist I am interested in the way in which art and social meaning is produced in a variety of periods, from the ancient to the modern, and a number of cultures, from India to the United States.

Detours

(a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)