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Courses

Get a feel for the exciting variety of courses taught at Marlboro.

This is a list of courses that faculty felt was representational of the courses offered. It is not a complete list of courses, some courses are offered yearly, while others are infrequent. A course may be inspired by events or strong interests and taught only once.

Most advanced work is in the form of tutorials on specific subjects, a collaboration between one faculty member and one student or a handful of students.

American Studies

Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2019

This course traces the emergence and development of a consumer oriented culture in the United States from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore the relationship between consumer culture and democracy, between places of consumption and places of production (leisure and work), between consumer goods and activities and issues of social identity, particularly relating to gender, class and race. We will also pay attention to movements and organizations which have resisted or challenged aspects of a dominant consumer culture. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the history of consumer culture in its related economic, political, social and cultural dimensions and an ability to read critically the messages and structures of contemporary consumer society. The class is designed to allow students to pursue particular research interests throughout the semester.

History of Feminisms in the U.S.
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2010

An exploration of the multiple and often conflicting feminisms which have shaped U.S. history from the 19th century to the present. Emphasis on the second and third waves, on the relationship between feminist thought and political organizing, and on generational divisions across time. Opportunity for students to pursue in-depth research on topics of their own choosing. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

HISTORY OF POLITICAL LIFE IN THE U.S. I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2014
Designated Writing

This course offers a wide ranging exploration of the multiple and often conflicting meanings of the democratic tradition in the U.S. from the colonial era through the Civil War. Areas of inquiry include the history of slavery, the intellectual and social milieux of the Revolutionary generation, the struggle to ratify the Constitution, the rise of mass political organizations in the nineteenth century, the expansion of a market economy, and the ideology of providential mission and destiny as a force in American politics. This course is strongly recommended for students anticipating future work in American Studies. Prerequisite: None

History of Political Life in the U.S. II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2015
Designated Writing

How have different social groups, in different historical contexts, struggled to define and organize public life in the United States? In exploring this question, the course offers a thematically organized survey of U.S. history from the latter part of the nineteenth century to the present. Central issues to be explored include the nature of democracy in an era marked by a centralization of political and economic power, the role of mass culture in shaping ideas of freedom and the good life, the struggle over national identity in the context of multiculturalism, and the history of social protest in affecting change. The course advances a definition of "politics" which links these issues not simply to the laws, structures and operations of  government but to a more inclusive set of institutions and practices and to an understanding of political life that incorporates how people imagine and represent the social order. Prerequisite: None

Materials & Methods in American Studies
( Variable Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014

A junior level seminar that draws on the particular research interests of beginning Plan students to explore a variety of methodological approaches and source materials in American Studies. This course may be taken for 2-4 credits.  Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor

Senior Seminar in American Studies
(2.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2015

The semester is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Students will present research in progress and read and critique each other's writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor  Note:  The class only meets on Tuesdays.

The Family in U.S. History II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Designated Writing

The course traces the history of family life in the US from the late nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on an interdisciplinary range of readings from History, Sociology, Anthropology and Gender Studies, we will explore how the family has both affected and been affected by the major historical developments of the past century. Topics to be examined include changing conceptions of marriage, child rearing and sexuality; the ongoing debate over family values as it relates to public policy; and the contested and shifting relationship between feminism and the family. The course is designed to highlight how cultural meanings and experiences of family life have changed over time and how those meanings and experiences have been shaped by race, class, ethnicity and gender. Prerequisite: None

For American Studies offerings, also see:

African-American Political Thought
After 9/11
AMERICA ON STAGE AND SCREEN
American Political Thought
ANGLO-AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION
Apocalyptic Hope: the Literature of the American Renaissance
First Contact: Voices of America's Frontiers
Jazz: History and Culture
Local History
Tell about the South: the South in the American Literary Imagination
The Land Ethic and Other Signs of Hope
The Making of the Contemporary World
TOPICS IN U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
U.S. CAPITALISM
WHAT WILL SUFFICE: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY
Who Owns the Land?
Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment
Writing Seminar: Exploring the (New) New Journalism

Anthropology

ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT & THEORY
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

An overview of the dominant theories and issues that have shaped anthropological research and writing in the 20th century. Paradigms to be investigated include Boasian anthropology, functionalism, French structuralism, cultural materialism, sociobiology, interpretive anthropology, feminist anthropology, historical anthropology, and reflexive anthropology. Prerequisite: Background in social sciences or permission of instructor

Anthropology Plan Writing Seminar
(1.00 Credit — Advanced)

Fall 2013

Whenever we write, we enter into a community of people sharing ideas. This seminar is intended to provide a space in which students on Plan in anthropology and related disciplines can come together to discuss their reading and writing. Prerequisite: Students doing senior Plan work in anthropology or a related discipline

EVERYDAY LIFE IN LATIN AMERICA
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

Latin America appears in the U.S. news for topics such as presidential elections and coups, trade policies, immigration issues, drug trafficking, tourism, and (recently) the Olympic site selection. But how do these issues and events relate to the everyday lives of the people who live there? This course focuses on peoples and cultures of Latin America and considers subjects such as ethnicity, race, and gender; wealth, poverty, and the challenges of making a living; growing up (childhood and rites of passage); and daily life in the context of broader political and economic events. Films will complement class readings. (Note: we will not always meet the two hours of this course slot; however, the extra time will allow for films shown in class.) Students will have the opportunity to do a final research project of their choosing. Prerequisite: None

FOOD & CULTURE
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

Everyone eats, but producing, procuring, preparing, and consuming food varies according to cultural and historical contexts. In this class we’ll consider a range of questions such as:

What do people eat? What don’t people eat? How does food link people in visible and invisible chains of relationships, from the local to the global? What is the nature of the preparation and consumption of food and how is this food tied to traditions near and far? In addition we will examine food practices and gustatory meaning systems, food and the body, the taste of place and other sensory dimensions of comestibles, and gendered dimensions of food. While readings will be drawn from research around the world, this class will also have a significant research component based on fieldwork in Marlboro.

Prerequisite: A background in the social sciences or a related discipline.

Introduction to Anthropology
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

This course provides a broad overview of cultural anthropology. We start by considering two concepts that are central to the discipline: the idea of "culture" and the research method called "fieldwork." From there, we take up a range of topics (e.g. language, social relations, economic exchange, power and control, belief systems, socialization, and the nature of the person) and consider the issues and approaches important to anthropologists. Class readings will include a number of ethnographic studies based on research in communities around the world. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Human Rights and Anthropology
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Designated Writing

This course will introduce students to human rights as the dominant language of social justice movements. Rather than investigating all forms of rights and protections, we will focus on three specific areas that are subjects of human rights activism: (1) environmentalism/biological citizenship, (2) Ethnic Minority/Collective Rights/Indigeneity, and (3) Migration. After discussing the theoretical foundations of human rights, we will read articles from anthropology journals on these three topics and then follow each section with readings from human rights theorists. The purpose of this course is to consider how various social issues can be framed within the discourse of human rights, and to discuss the merits and problems with applying a human rights frame to complex social and moral issues. Students will present on one of these three areas of focus and produce a research paper on a topic of their own choosing.

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

This is an introductory course to socio-cultural anthropology that provides a general intellectual history of the discipline.  The course reviews research methods and analyzes the study of culture in terms of production and critique.  This class is not meant to survey the entire field but instead aims to introduce students to basic anthropological theoretical orientations and to the importance of long-term ethnography. As such, we will read contemporary articles from leading anthropology journals and full-length ethnographies, as well as excerpts of key canonical texts, in the course to gain a better understanding of what is anthropology and how it is written.  This class will explore concepts including kinship, power, race, exchange, cultural relativism, globalization, and political economy.  Paramount to this class is the understanding that culture is a dynamic, complicated, and context-dependent concept; it is not a fixed or bounded “thing” of peoples and places. Throughout, we will employ a comparative perspective as socio-cultural anthropology rests upon this fundamental goal of making the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. While this class may engage in cross-cultural comparisons, students are also expected to draw connections between groups of people across time and space. Prerequisite: None

PLAN SEMINAR: READING AND WRITING CULTURE
( Variable Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

In recent years, anthropologists have been experimenting with innovative forms of writing as a means to explore how they construct and represent people's lives in words. In this seminar we will consider how to read and write ethnographies and, in doing so, will ask questions about narrative form, audience, argument, uses of field data, the place of the fieldworker/writer, and more. Students are expected to either have field materials with which they want to work or be willing to do a small field-based project as part of the seminar. This seminar would work well taken with "Designing Fieldwork." Prerequisite: Course work in the social sciences or history

Plan Seminar: Reading and Writing Culture (Part 2)
(2.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2012

This is a continuation of the Plan Seminar of the same name offered in fall semester 20112. -- Whenever we write, we enter into a community of people sharing ideas. This seminar is intended to provide a space in which students on Plan in anthropology and related disciplines can come together to discuss their reading and writing. Prerequisite: Senior Plan work in anthropology or a related discipline.

SENSES OF PLACE
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

Everyone lives someplace, but how people conceive of where they live differs according to particular cultural senses of space and place. In this course we will draw on readings from a number of world areas to consider how spaces may be embodied, engendered, inscribed, torn apart, crossed, and drawn together; how people relate to different places experientially and expressively; and how how different places reflect and help create -- or problematize people's identities. An integral part of the class will be student-conducted fieldwork on course-related topics. Prerequisite: Coursework in the social sciences

Social Suffering
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

This seminar will first examine a range of bearable and unbearable forms of suffering, including: war, poverty, disease, insecurity, political violence, and natural disasters. Within medical anthropology, social suffering has become an important subject of anthropological inquiry whereby ethnographers record everyday forms of suffering within communities and amongst individuals in various societies. Juxtaposing ordinary suffering of everyday life against the sudden eruption of extraordinary suffering, this seminar examines various modes of explanation, experience, humanitarianism and ethics. Some of the questions this seminar will pose include: what should ethnographers do with the disciplinary practice of cultural relativism in a world of great suffering? Is “witnessing the inhuman” enough, or do anthropologists have an obligation to help end human suffering? What is the ethical role of anthropologists in the face of human suffering? If anthropologists intervene, what assumptions of authority, power and inequality are embedded in such efforts? Additionally, this course will also require students to consider how communities and individuals survive mass violence, poverty, and “ordinary” forms of suffering or human deprivation.  Prerequisite: Familiarity with social science research

For Anthropology offerings, also see:

After 9/11
ETHNOBIOLOGY
First Contact: Voices of America's Frontiers
Living with War
Political Rituals
Research Methods
The Soviet Era Through Film and Memoir
TRAVELERS AND TOURISM

Art History

ART HISTORY QUESTIONS
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2012

Who made it? For whom did they make it? And Why did they make it? These are some of the longstanding questions that have framed and structured the discipline of art history. But over the last 20 years art history has changed dramatically, destabilizing the status of even these most fundamental of the discipline's questions. Many art historians focus on an entirely different set of questions, such as: How was the image or sculpture understood? How was it displayed? Who saw it? In what way does a work's style reinforce a specific cultural ideology? In this course, which will serve as an introduction to the study of art and art history, students will learn a variety of ways of looking at and understanding visual culture. The course will begin by setting up a chronological framework for the study of world art, it will then leapfrog through time stopping to examine works of art in various periods and the ways in which art historians have written about them. The focus of the course will be on paintings, sculptures and various forms of art objects although there will be some discussion of architecture as well. Prerequisite: None

Art History Survey II - From the 15th century to the Present
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

This class is a continuation of Survey I although it differs methodologically. We will focus on a select number of particular works of art each semester, thus the class may be taken more than once since the material of the class and readings will change from semester to semester. The aim of the class is to develop the skill sets introduced in the first half of the survey by looking at, analyzing and reading about specific works in depth. In addition, time will be spent discussing the different ways in which Art Historians have organized the discourse including chronological and media structures and stylistic and cultural categories.

Classical Vision
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2011

The twenty-first century viewer is so accustomed to visual imagery that reproduces, in the most minute detail, the thing, view, person seen, that this kind of image production is taken to be the goal to which all image makers aspire (up until the modern period, that is). To many the imagery of the classical periods in western art history, Greece, Rome, the Italian Renaissance and nineteenth-century France set the standards by which much artistic production, even today, is measured. This course examines how and attempts to understand why “Classical” or “Naturalistic” or “Realistic” vision transformed the artistic production of these cultures across time and space and why it continues to be important to us today. Prerequisite: None

Creating Views: Design & Display from the Invention of the Museum to Today
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

The museum seems to be a uniquely modern institution. A place where works of art, identified as such by trained experts, are displayed for the most part outside of the original context of their making and use. Through this process these same works gain new meaning and new identities. They become representative of cultures and peoples of the past, a past that is processed, defined and sometimes created by the display itself. This class takes a critical approach to museum exhibits, to collecting and to the classification of cultures and art that goes on in curatorial studies today. Our approach will look across cultures to understand not just how display creates meaning and provides a framework for interpretation of works of art, but for the cultures that those works come to represent. This class is designed to develop the following key skills: collaboration, global competence, creativity in expression and problem solving and network and information literacy. In addition, of course, you will learn something of the history of museum display, art historical methods and practices, and issues of design and viewing that are key to the museum experience. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the History of Art Part I: The Pre-Modern World
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of art history and to the curriculum as it is taught at Marlboro College. We will begin with the skills that art historians use, critical visual analysis (which includes historical analysis), critical reading and critical writing. Students will develop these skills through a variety of exercises, including museum visits, in-class presentations and written assignments. As the class progresses we will study the history of architecture and urban design, painting and sculpture through the multiple lenses of patronage, ritual practice, state control and social experience, among others. The art and architectural works covered in the class date from pre-history to the fourteenth century and the geographic range includes the Mediterranean, Europe, Southeast Asia and the Middle East.

Making Meaning Out of Stone: Built Environment & Ritual Practice in Florence & Cairo c.1300
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019

Cities have always been sites of protest, transformation, dream making and dream dashing, triumph, celebration and disaster. Human activity, building practices and civic authority all play a role in the creation and production of both the stage and the “play” of city life. This course undertakes to examine two world historical cities, Florence and Cairo in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Both were key cities of the Mediterranean world at this time, experiencing remarkable growth in their architectural fabric, their world renown and their earthly riches. The aim of the course is to probe, through an examination of primary documents and the built environment, what lived experience in these two cities was like.

  • Permission of instructor

Seeing(reading)the Bible: Christian Iconography from Byzantium to Boston
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2013

From the period of the earliest Christian rituals to the late nineteenth century a substantial amount of pictorial and sculptural art in Europe was focused on connecting human experience and ritual practice to the experience of and with the divine. This class begins by examining the creation of a particular Christian iconography. We will look at the artistic traditions out of which Christian art sprung both textual and visual and analyze the choices made in the creation of a canonical language of Christian imagery. During this section of the class students will be required to read the entirety of the New Testament and excerpts of the Hebrew Bible. We will then examine the strains placed upon that production in various periods from the Iconoclastic controversy, to the rise of Humanism in the European Renaissance to the Enlightenment.

For Art History offerings, also see:

A History of Now
Topics in Human Understanding

Asian Studies

A Frog Jumps In: Seminar in Japanese History & Culture
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2017
Global Perspective

The ripples of Japanese culture have reached all sides of the Pacific. This seminar will examine selected topics in the origins and development of Japanese history and culture from the earliest records to the present. We will begin with a general overview of Japanese language, history and geography. We will then consider the fundamental themes of Japanese history while reading key works on Japanese literature, politics, religion, and contemporary society.  We will pay particular attention to issues of art and the environment. Each student will complete a number of short assignments in the first half of the term and an independent research project and linked presentation in the second half of the term.   Knowledge of Japanese language is not necessary, but some prior exposure to Japanese culture will be helpful.

Brush, Sword, and Hoe: Ancient Chinese History & Culture
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Global Perspective

This course will examine the development of Chinese culture from the earliest divination rites to the court intrigues of the Ming dynasty. Along the way we will study the creation and growth of the imperial institution and meritocratic civil service that made it work; we will discuss China’s complex relations with its central Asian neighbors; we will consider some of the fabulous economic and technological developments that made Chinese products the envy of the world in the 17th century; and we will read a selection of poetry and prose by Tang hermits, Song officials, and Ming aesthetes.

China's Problems Since Mao
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

During the last thirty-five years, the People's Republic of China has achieved economic growth on a historically unprecedented scale. But at what cost? This class will consider some of the problems that have attended China's tremendous development: environmental degradation, ethnic conflict, and human rights. While each problem has roots that run deep in Chinese history, each also has very distinctive contemporary expressions. After a brief survey of contemporary China's political, economic, and geographic framework, we will examine the relationship between individuals, social movements, and the state through case studies on water quality, ethnic minorities in Tibet and Xinjiang, the pro-democracy movement of Tiananmen Square, and the One-Child Policy. Students will write frequent responses to the reading, and will track, over the course of the term, specific issues of interest to them using on-line resources, culminating in a presentation to the class. Prerequisite: None

CONCEPTIONS OF TIME AND SPACE IN ASIA
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

What are time and space? Paradoxically, they appear to be universal yet culturally distinct; ineffable yet quotidian. Drawing on the disciplines of history, geography, art history, literature, and religion, this course will investigate the ways in which time and space have been shaped and understood in Asia. We will begin by considering traditional connections between space and power in temple architecture and pilgrimage rituals, the fengshui (geomancy) and correlative cosmology of China, and the principle of emptiness in Japan. The course will then examine the changes wrought in Asian conceptions of time and space by modernizing projects ranging from cartography in Thailand to irrigation in Indonesia.Prerequisite: Previous coursework in anthropology, cultural history, art history, history or Asian studies, or permission of instructor

Dark Twins: The Underside of Asian Urbanization
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

While Asia is still often stereotypically pictured as agricultural, it is now home to most of the world's largest cities. And while these cities are rightly seen as places for coming together, they also depend on social and physical segregations. In “dark twins” such as ghettos, squatter settlements, unregulated sweatshops, jails and sewer systems, much of the work that allows these newly prosperous cities to function takes place. Using history, sociology, anthropology, journalism and urban planning, we will peer into the history of these hidden spaces. What institutions, formal and informal, create and preserve urban enclaves? How does the study of these “dark twins” change our understanding of cosmopolises such as Shanghai, Hong Kong, Bangkok, Mumbai, Naypyidaw and Chandigarh? Prerequisite: None, but knowledge of Asian history helpful

Making Way: Daoist Ritual and Practice
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

Reading the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi may tell us what Daoists believe, but what do they do? In this course we will consider not the tenets, but the central practices of Daoism. Using the works of historians, anthropologists, scholars of religion, medical practitioners, tai-chi masters, poets, and other wanderers on the way, we will explore ritual, self-cultivation, health, and community organization in the Daoist experience. Students will write a substantial research paper over the course of the semester. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in Asian Studies or prior training in meditation or martial arts

Modern Chinese History & Culture
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2017
Global Perspective

A continuation of “Ancient Chinese History and Culture,” this course will examine the major trends in Chinese history from the 17th century to the present. Along the way we will consider phenomenal expansion of China's territory, population, and economy under the Manchu Qing dynasty. We will then explore the onslaught of rebellion, reform, and revolution that put an end to the imperial system. We will consider the environmental consequences of economic development and political turmoil.  Finally, we will study the radical communism of Mao Zedong and conclude by looking at the challenges facing China today. Throughout the semester we will focus on the changing forms of political power and their implications for empowerment and accountability.

PLAN WRITING SEMINAR IN ASIAN STUDIES
( Variable Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2013

A weekly seminar devoted to the drafting, critiquing and revising of Plan papers in Asian Studies.

Rice, Ritual, & Revolution: A Survey of Southeast Asian History
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

This course will survey the history of Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei, and the Philippines) from the earliest written records to the present.  During the first half of the semester, we will consider Indian and Chinese influences on the region; local forms of kingship, social organization, and religious expression; and the onset of European colonialism.  In the second half, we will turn our attention to nationalist movements, the Japanese occupation during WWII, and political independence in the post-war period.  Reading will include a comprehensive textbook, historical monographs, a memoir, and a novel.  Students will conclude the semester with research papers on subjects of their own choosing. Prerequisite: None

The Nation and Its Others: Ethnicity in Asia
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

What is ethnicity? How is it related to nationality? And why are the two so important? This class tries to answer these questions by looking at a wide range of case studies in modern Asia: Highlanders in Indonesia, Overseas Chinese in Malaysia, the Ainu in Japan, the various minorities in Southwest China and the Mongols in Central Asia. In each of these cases we find tensions between minority and majority populations. Who has the power to determine who belongs to which ethnic group? What resources become available through ethnic and national belonging? What responsibilities do they entail? We will look at state policy and social responses in the realms of religion, tourism, cultural preservation, economic development and language use. Students will do close readings of pieces from the contemporary media and will conclude the semester with a research paper on a subject of their choosing. Prerequisite: Previous coursework in Asian studies, anthropology, or sociology

For Asian Studies offerings, also see:

HINDUISM
Plan Writing Seminar
The Making of the Contemporary World
Wrestling with Ancestors: Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism

Biochemistry

Biochemistry of the Cell
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019

Biochemists used to debate the nature of proteins: their composition, structure and function. Now we know many extraordinary details of the shapes of proteins and how they function. For example, how they help our bodies acquire nutrients from food, and use those nutrients for fuel and carry oxygen to our tissues. In particular, researchers have revealed the intricacies of how a protein’s structure is related to its function. In this course we will employ an evolutionary perspective as we discuss major topics such as amino acids, proteins and protein structure, bioenergetics, enzymes and enzyme function. We will also study major metabolic pathways and their key control points. Our goals are for you to develop a thorough understanding of how enzymes work and to be familiar with key metabolic pathways and how they are controlled. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I & II; Co-requisite: Laboratory in Biochemistry of the Cell

Biochemistry of the Cell Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019

This laboratory will be an introduction to techniques commonly used by biochemists, and must be taken in conjunction with Biochemistry of the Cell. Your work in the laboratory will focus on a semester-long investigation of an enzyme. This project will allow you to perform your own biochemistry research project in which you will employ the principles of chemistry and biochemistry that we study in the classroom. The protein you will investigate is already well-characterized. That is, previous research has described in detail the properties of the enzyme. Your goal is to determine if the enzyme you isolate is the same as that described in the primary literature. To answer this question we will begin with basic laboratory procedures such as preparing reagents, chromatography and performing a protein assay. We will then explore techniques for studying the activity of enzymes, and methods for separating proteins, such as one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Finally we will employ immunochemical methods for the identification of proteins. Throughout this semester-long project you will also learn about the procedures for data acquisition and analysis that will allow you to draw meaningful conclusions from your results. 

  • Organic Chemistry 1 & 11

Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2018

Scientists' ability to study, understand and manipulate DNA has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. In this course we will explore the structure of nucleic acids and the organization of genes and chromosomes. We will also examine DNA "packaging" and replication, the roles of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis and the control of gene expression. A major theme of this course will be how experimental evidence supports our current understanding of the structure and function of genes. This course will include discussions of how these processes can be manipulated to yield powerful laboratory techniques for the study of the organization, regulation and function of genes and gene products. The central structure of the course will be discussions based on selected readings, including journal articles, and in-class projects. We will also discuss homework assignments, and both of sets of discussions will be informed by readings from the text.

  • Biochemistry of the Cell

Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2018

Put on your safari shirt and pith helmet because we’re going hunting...for DNA sequences. We’ll use a technique called DNA barcoding to identify a range of organisms on the Marlboro campus. For example, what species of bacteria are in the soil around the college? Are there any coyotes around? To answer these questions students will learn a variety of basic molecular biology techniques, including DNA purification and quantification. Students will also build thermal cyclers for performing more advanced techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an important step in DNA barcoding. Students will also learn basic concepts and techniques in bioinformatics and use these tools to analyze DNA sequence data.  

WRITING SEMINAR: Genetic Engineering: Who's Driving the Train?
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2017
Writing Seminar

In 1953 scientists James Watson and Francis Crick first deduced the structure of DNA, and since then the advances in molecular biology have been staggering. Scientists can make plants resistant to pesticides. Doctors can cure children born with no immune system. Genome sequencing and stem cell technology may someday lead to personalized medical advice and replacement organs grown from your own skin cells. But DNA science also raises serious ethical questions. For example, what risks do we take when we release genetically engineered organisms into the environment, and do pest-resistant GM crops really reduce the use of pesticides? In this course we will explore advances in human understanding of DNA, and the promises and perils associated with scientists' ability to manipulate genetic material. We will examine the personalities driving DNA research, as well as the politics and financial incentives involved. This course will provide a general introduction to the nature and function of DNA, RNA, and protein. Students with prior experience in these topics are welcome although the course is intended as a general introduction to non-specialists. This course is therefore not considered a foundation course that prepares students for advanced study in the field. Prerequisite: None

For Biochemistry offerings, also see:

Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II

Biology

Anatomy of Movement
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

An introduction to human anatomy with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanical principles of movement. Concepts will be explored through a combination of scientific study, experiential anatomy, and dance movement.

Animal Behavior
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2017

Animals have evolved a remarkable diversity of behavioral patterns used in wide ranging ecological and social contexts. In this course, we will examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior (neurological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental) as well as the evolutionary bases of behavior by utilizing a variety of real-world examples from a broad range of taxa. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Additional Fee:$ 0

Animal Behavior Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2014

This laboratory will develop your ability to measure, quantify and assess the behavior of animals. You will receive extensive training on the scientific method and hypothesis testing. Students will gain experience in the research techniques and critical thinking through an independent research topic. Prerequisite: NSC 344

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
(6.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2012

In this course we will examine vertebrate anatomy and the diversity that exists in the major vertebrate groups (including humans). In class we will focus on the development and evolution of anatomical structures, emphasizing how anatomy relates to function. The laboratory component will give you hands-on experience with anatomy through dissections that will allow you to increase your understanding and appreciation for the structure, function and evolution of the vertebrate body plan.

Prerequisite: General Biology I & II

General Biology I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

General Biology I is an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. We begin the semester with an examination of the molecular, cellular, and metabolic nature of living organisms and then explore the genetic basis of life. General Biology I & II serve as the foundation for further work in life sciences. 

  • some chemistry beneficial

General Biology I Lab
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

The focus of this course is an exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. We will study such organisms as bacteria, yeast, molds, and mammalian cell cultures including cancer cells, plants, bacteria and others, and spend time in the Ecological Reserve. Skill in basic laboratory techniques in biology will be acquired throughout the semester. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students.

  • Concurrent enrollment in General Biology I or permission of instructor

General Biology II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function and ecology.

  • General Biology I or permission of instructor

General Biology II Lab
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting with independent student projects and a survey of Marlboro's Ecological Reserve vernal pool ecosystems. Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II or consent of instructor.

General Ecology & Ecology Lab
(5.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

Ecology is the study of the interactions and interrelationships between organisms and their environment. In this course we will examine factors that contribute to the distribution and abundance of organisms and, hence, to the structure of biotic communities.  In the lab portion we will take a hands-on approach to learning important concepts discussed in class. You will be introduced to the methods that ecologists use to design, carry out and analyze research. This course should be taken by all students with a life-science orientation in the environmental sciences. Prerequisite: College-level Biology

Genetics & Evolution
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2019

"Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution" - T. Dobzhansky This course serves as an in-depth examination of the unifying principles of evolutionary biology. We will cover the genetic basis of evolutionary change with an emphasis on Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics and then develop an understanding of the mechanisms of evolution including natural selection. Our understanding will then allow us to explore such concepts as phylogenetic relationships, adaptation, and coevolution.  Recommended for all students doing Plan work in the life sciences. Prerequisite: College-level biology course

  • College level biology or permission of the instructor

Mammalogy
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

This course is a biological survey of members of the Class Mammalia. We will cover classification, physiology, morphology, behavior, and ecology in order to able to recognize morphological specializations and evolutionary relationships among mammals. Pre-requisite: College-level biology or permission of instructor

Additional Fee:$ 0

  • College-level biology or permission of instructor

Ornithology
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2016

 If it has a feather, it’s a bird. If it has a feather it probably has large wings. If it has large wings, it is highly mobile. If it’s highly mobile, it has a potent metabolism and has frequent and therefore complex interactions with other species. Because it also has frequent and complex interactions with humans, it is often at risk of extinction. And so we have a course entitled ornithology. This course is a study of the anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Text readings will be supplemented with primary literature and we will schedule regular bird walks in order to identify and observe birds in their natural habitat.

  • College-level biology or permission of instructor

Plant Diversity
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2018
Designated Writing

Plants are vital elements of life on earth and spectacular in their diversity.  Mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants will be among the plants we investigate.  Our explorations will include questions about morphology, reproduction, physiology, ecology and evolution in these groups of plants.  In addition to discussion, we will also have the opportunity to learn about plants in lab/greenhouse and field settings. 

Plant Reproductive Biology
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2016

Sexual reproduction in flowering plants involves a complex series of processes. How is pollen transferred among plants? How do seed and fruit production occur? How are seeds and fruits dispersed? How do seeds germinate and seedlings become established to begin the next generation of plants? We will explore physiological, ecological and evolutionary dimensions of these questions. Examples will include a diversity of plant taxa in ecosystems throughout the world, and we will engage in greenhouse and fieldwork projects.

  • General Biology or permission of instructor

Plants of Vermont
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

A study of the taxonomic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships of the dominant vascular plant families of Vermont. How do we identify flowering plants and how do they interact with other plants and animals such as pollinators and seed dispersers?  Fieldwork, including several fieldtrips to local areas of botanical interest, will take place during a Friday 1:30-4:50 lab in the first half of the semester. 

Viva la difference! Exploring tales and tools of genetic variation
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

Scientists have traced the migrations of humans out of Africa and across the Middle East, Europe, Asia, and beyond. Contained in the DNA of people around the world are clues to these patterns of migration. Even today, in the DNA of each one of our cells, is evidence of our place in this story of human origin and migration. Variation in the sequences of our DNA reveals these ancient patterns. Genetic variation is also the raw material for many other types of scientific research:  e.g., studies of human disease, and the genetic structure of populations of rare and endangered species. This course is designed as an introduction to the concept of genetic variation and to the tools used by scientists to study this phenomenon. We will explore examples of these studies from research on human origins, human disease, and species conservation. The course will involve readings and classroom discussions, laboratory work, and fieldwork.

Prerequisite: One semester of college-level chemistry or biology

For Biology offerings, also see:

ETHNOBIOLOGY
Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB
Statistics

Ceramics

Ceramics - Topics
(3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2013

The aim of this course is to decipher the unique language of the ceramic surface. Students will study clays, slips, glazes, firing methods, and alternative surfaces to uncover their role in determining the character of a ceramic object. The course will include research of historical and contemporary approaches to the ceramic surface, as well as studio experimentation, concluding with an independent research project. We will also investigate possibilities for incorporating drawing, painting and printmaking methods on clay. Students will use handbuilding and wheel throwing techniques for studio projects, and the course is intended for beginning and intermediate students. Prerequisite: None

Materials fee: $95.

Ceramics I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2014

This course will introduce students to the primary forming methods in ceramics as well as providing the building blocks for a technical understanding of the material and processes. Students will be encouraged in a variety of making techniques working both sculpturally and functionally. Prerequisite: None

Additional Fee: $100

Ceramics II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

Focused on developing hand building skills introduced in Ceramics I, this course will begin with diverse assignments and conclude with a self-directed project. Students will develop a material understanding and their personal aesthetic choices. Ceramics history and contemporary issues will be discussed. There will be a presentation and written component. 

Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission of the instructorAdditional Fee:$95

Clay & Commodities: An Introduction to the Material Culture of Ceramic Objects
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

This course will introduce students to some of the basic theories in the study of material culture by looking at the use of ceramic objects in several cultures and time periods.  We will combine readings in the theories of material culture with close investigations of particular objects, their position in society, their use, and the continued appreciation today.  Objects will include pre-historic cooking pots, Greek amphorae, Japanese tea bowls, and Russian and British porcelain, among others.  The course will involve some hands on work with clay as well as several field trips and museum visits.  Permission of instructors required.

Additional Fee: $40.00

WHEEL THROWING II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

Building on basic wheel-throwing skills, assignments will examine the use of the wheel in the creation of both functional and sculptural work. Focus will be on component pieces and strategies for altering the symmetrical wheel thrown form.

Prerequisite: Ceramics I

Additional Fee: $110

Chemistry

Chemistry in the Kitchen
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

Ever wonder why bread dough rises? Or what makes a chocolate bar melt when it's heated? When we cook, we see food change. Chemistry explains these changes. Harold McGee, author of On food and cooking: the science and lore of the kitchen, agrees: "science can make cooking more interesting by connecting it with the basic workings of the natural world." In this course, we will explore food and cooking through experiments that ask questions such as: How does heat change food? How do bacteria perform fermentation? Why is the fermented food acidic? What is an acid, anyway? Through these explorations we will build an understanding of how chemistry explains cooking. This is a chemistry course - with the kitchen as our laboratory. The course will meet twice a week: once in the classroom, and once in the kitchen. Each week we will discuss a new topic in chemistry and then use our laboratory time in the kitchen to address our questions. Prerequisite: None

General Chemistry I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting, and include topics such as creating more efficient solar collectors and the reactions of natural and human-made chemicals in the environment. We will explore these topics as we learn about atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds, molecular structure and other concepts central to modern chemistry. Many of these topics are related to current health topics and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH include research on ocean acidification, and our exploration of thermochemistry includes calculations of the fuel value of traditional and alternative fuels.

General Chemistry I Lab
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

Science is a process, not a collection of facts. In this laboratory we will combine the study of chemistry with the process of science. Our explorations will focus on "pharmacognosy" which is the scientific study of medicinal plants. We will begin by developing some basic quantitative skills and familiarity with laboratory techniques. The activities for these early parts of the lab will be fairly structured. As you develop your ability to approach a problem scientifically the activities will be less structured. You will have more responsibility for designing and conducting your own experiments on medicinal herbs. Students will work on projects in groups but each student will keep their own laboratory notebook and write their own laboratory reports.

General Chemistry II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this introductory chemistry course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of thermodynamics, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. We will start each chapter with a discussion of selected topics, followed by in-class projects, problem-solving sessions and homework review.

  • General Chemistry I (NSC158)

General Chemistry II Laboratory
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on bio-remediation and electrochromic materials. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments.

  • General Chemistry I Laboratory

Organic Chemistry I
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

Carbon can form bonds with itself and almost all of the other elements, giving rise to an enormous variety of carbon-containing molecules. Early organic chemists struggled with the structure of one--a cyclic molecule called benzene--until Friedrich Kekulé solved the puzzle in a dream: he saw the carbon atoms “twisting in a snake-like motion. But look! What was this? One of the snakes had seized hold of its own tail, and the form whirled mockingly before my eyes.” In this course we study the chemistry of these carbon-based compounds--their structures, properties and reactions. Many of these concepts will be discussed in the context of biological systems, and class sessions will frequently be devoted to problem-solving sessions and small group projects. This is an intermediate chemistry course and provides essential background for biology, chemistry, pre-med, and pre-veterinary students. 

  • General Chemistry I (NSC158)

Organic Chemistry I Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

In the laboratory we will apply the concepts and analytical skills we develop in the classroom. We will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with organic chemistry laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow students to explore ideas discussed in class through structured protocols as well as through more open-ended inquiry. Initial laboratory sessions will guide students through the isolation and identification of various compounds of interest, preparing students for their own more in-depth research. By using these techniques students will become comfortable working in a laboratory and familiar with techniques commonly used by organic chemists.

Organic Chemistry II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2019

Organic chemistry takes its name from the ancient idea that certain molecules - organic molecules - could only be made by living organisms. In second semester organic chemistry we will continue our study of different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. The first part of the semester will include material on important analytical techniques such as IR spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In the latter part of the semester we will turn to the original realm of organic chemistry - living systems. For example, we will examine properties and reactions of amines, carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, amino acids, peptides and proteins, and lipids. This semester will also include a special focus on the process of olfaction in humans. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (NSC12) Additional Fee:$ 0

  • NSC12 Organic Chemistry I

Organic Chemistry II Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2019

Preparation, purification and synthesis of organic compounds using microscale techniques. The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on self-designed laboratory investigations. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry Lab I; Enrollment in or completion of Organic Chemistry II

  • Organic Chemistry I Lab

For Chemistry offerings, also see:

Biochemistry of the Cell
Biochemistry of the Cell Lab
Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab

Classics

Greek IA
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015
Global Perspective

This is a beginner's course in Ancient Greek. Greek is a truly special language, with an incredible variety of expression, beauty of sound, and richness of thought, literature, and history. It can be challenging, and regular quizzes and consolidation will be integral to the course; but hard work will yield rich rewards. We will be working from Athenaze, a textbook designed for students starting Greek at college, which focuses on exposing students to continuous Greek prose as early as possible. Prerequisite: None

Greek IB
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016
Global Perspective

Continuation of Greek IA.

  • Greek IA or permission of instructor

Greek IIA
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018
Global Perspective

Continuation of Greek IB.

In this intermediate course, you will strengthen and enrich your knowledge of Greek morphology, grammar, and vocabulary as you gain experience in reading Greek prose. We will read and discuss Xenophon’s Symposium, a lively narrative of an aristocratic drinking-party with Socrates as the guest of honor.

Greek IIB
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

Continuation of Greek IIA.

Latin IA
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015
Global Perspective

This is a beginner's course in Latin. Students come to Latin for many reasons: to understand better their own and other languages; to access one of the richest bodies of literature and history in the world; or simply as an intellectual test. Latin is a demanding language, and students should be prepared for regular short quizzes to reinforce material as we go along, but consistent effort will pay rich dividends. We'll be working from the latest edition of Wheelock's Latin, designed for moderate-to-intense language training at college level, which introduces students to the basic elements of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, and offers students original Latin thought and language as soon as possible. Prerequisite: None

Latin IB
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016

Continuation of Latin IA.

  • Latin IA or equivalent

Latin IIA
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018
Global Perspective

TITLE: Intermediate Latin Prose: Cornelius Nepos & Cicero.

Continuation of Latin IB.

In this intermediate course, you will strengthen and enrich your knowledge of Latin morphology, grammar, and vocabulary as you gain experience in reading Latin prose. In the first half of the course, we will translate and discuss several Lives (Vitae) of ancient men written by Cornelius Nepos, a 1st century Roman with a clear and accessible style. His Vitae are short biographies of important ancient personages, such as Themistocles, Hannibal, and Cato. In the second half of the course we will read selections from Cicero’s Pro Caelio, a courtroom speech by Rome’s greatest orator in defense of a young friend who fell into legal trouble while enjoying the fast life with the rich and famous of Republican Rome.

Latin IIB
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

Continuation of Latin IIA.

Myth and Meaning
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2013

No one can sensibly claim to understand myth. The category – ‘myth’ – resists definition. A vast amount of information, mostly in the form of narratives, has been assigned to it. We will be trying to come to terms with some of this information. Myths from around the world will be considered. A range of theoretical approaches will be employed. Ideology and the construction of meaning will be recurrent themes. The Greek mythical tradition will be explored in detail, especially in relation to religion, ritual and philosophy. After Spring Break the focus will be on myth in Latin literature.

Of Arms and the Man I Sing: Ancient Epic from Gilgamesh to the Aeneid
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2011
Designated Writing

Two works from the ancient world survive in greater numbers than any other: Homer's two great epics, the Iliad - the original story of the Trojan war - and the Odyssey, a colourful account of Odysseus' long journey home from Troy. Homer's work was a common cultural reference point for all Greece, and not without reason has been dubbed 'the bible of the Greeks'; Homer himself was often simply referred to as 'The Poet'. Vergil's Aeneid, a very Roman reworking of both epics, tells the story of the foundation of Rome, and achieved a similarly canonical status almost overnight.

But despite this canonical status, the ancient epics have retained their capacity to surprise us. In spite of its martial theme, Homer's Iliad is also a work deeply interested in the lives of others, be they women, children, or enemies. Vergil's Aeneid by contrast, so long disparaged as an eloquent but ultimately vacuous panegyric of the emperor Augustus, has in recent years been rehabilitated as a profound and at times disturbing meditation on the darker side of Roman imperialism. This course is a chance to trace this foundational genre from its ancient near eastern origins to imperial Rome; topics covered will include mythology and folklore, oral literature, heroism, gender, ethics, warfare, and the gods. Prerequisite: None.

Rethinking Rome: Power, Society, and Faith in the High Roman Empire
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2011
Designated Writing

This course will fall into three parts: first we will look at the Roman emperors and their opponents, from the bumbling Claudius to the debauched Nero; second, we will consider Roman society from top to bottom - from miserable slaves and the urban poor to the provincial elites who aped and opposed their imperial masters in equal measure; finally we will turn to religion, contemplating the radically unfamiliar 'pagan' religious system, the position of Jews in the ancient world, and the astonishing rise of Christianity at the end of our period. Throughout we will encounter some eminently modern themes: the corrupting nature of power; the enduring role of propaganda and public relations; the nature and meaning of meaning of cultural change; the varied forms of oppression and resistance; and the position of minority groups in a multicultural world.This course will above all be centered around the close reading of a set of core sources (both literary and visual), but we will also consider famous recent artistic interpretations of the period (including 'I Claudius', 'Gladiator', and 'Caligula'). We will approach this period from as many angles as possible in our effort to build up a full picture of this incredible society (literary, artistic, architectural, economic, and even sociological) and so this course would make an ideal complement to other courses in areas such as history, culture, religion, or politics. Prerequisite: None

Sex, Violence, & Vengeance: Greek Tragedy for All the Ages
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

In his own time the Greek tragedian Euripides was accused of making the young idle and corrupting women, and ever since the fifth century BC Greek tragedy has not lost this power to provoke. ‘Feminist' tragedies were read aloud at suffragette meetings at the beginning of the 20th century, while the tragedian Sophocles was reworked during the second world war in occupied to France to encode resistance to the Nazis. In this course we shall consider some of the greatest and most well known Greek tragedies, and explore not only radically different conceptions of justice, fate, theodicy, feminism, and political authority, to name just a few key themes, but also the workings of the unfamiliar and formal literary ‘grammar' of Greek tragedy. It is hoped that the course will culminate in a short performance of extracts from Euripides Medea. Prerequisite: None

Song Culture in Ancient Greece & Early 20th Century America
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

This course will consider ancient Greece and parts of early 20th century America as "song cultures," or societies "whose prime medium for the expression and communication of its most important feelings and ideas was song."  (Almost all suriving Greek poetry was originally song: while writing has preserved the words that were sung, we have lost the music and sometimes dance that made up equal parts of musical performances.)  We will read works of Greek poets such as Sappho, Alkaios, Anakreon, and Pindar on the ancient side; on the more modern, we will spend time with the different types of folk music in America and their overlapping offpsring, blues and jazz.   Topics to be addressed include (but in no way are limited to) performance, occasion, tradition, innovation, authorship, authenticity, and plagiarism.

Computer Science

Algorithms
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2019

An exploration of some classic computer science recipes and the ideas behind them. Topics will include big O notation, data structures such as queues and heaps, as well as problems involving sorting, searching, analyzing graphs, and encoding data. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science which is typically offered every other year. The primary programming language this semester will by python. Additional Fee:$0

  • previous programming course or experience

Artificial Intelligence
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2015

An examination of the methods used in problems encountered in trying to teach computers to "think." Topics covered will be among the following: representation of knowledge, learning, game theory, perception, neural networks, cellular automata, cognitive modeling, and natural language processing. Most people who work in AI program in Lisp, and so we will likely use it as well (learn it along the way), but that won't be the main focus of the course. This is an intermediate course in computer science and as such assumes previous programming experience. Prerequisite: Substantive programming experience

Computer Systems
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

A look at what goes on "under the hood" of a computer, in the implementation in machine code of a C program running on a Linux computer. Sometimes called "Computer Organization", a course like this one is a required part of most computer science degree programs, typically taken by sophomores after a course or two in basic programming concepts. Topics include the C programming language, machine-level data representation and assembly language, processor organization, system performance, memory caching, code compilation and linking and similar fun stuff. This course is likely to be offered every few years. Textbook: Computer Systems: A Programmer's Perspective, ISBN 0136108040.

  • Previous programming experience

Digital Arts Workshop
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

An open exploration of computer tools and techniques for working with images, sound, animation, video, and 3D models, aimed at anyone who wants to practice using software to make digital art. We'll be primarily using open source software such as the Gimp (images), Audacity (sound), Processing (motion capture with the Kinect) and Blender (animation). Class time will be spent looking at underlying concepts, learning software applications, and sharing ongoing work on projects. This class may be repreated for credit and may (depending on the amount of work and with permission of instructor) be taken for variable credit. Prerequisite: None

Digital Multimedia
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

A workshop in manipulating images, music, animation, and video with a computer, including some background topics in optics, acoustics, and the internet. Where possible, we'll be primarily using open source software systems such as the Gimp (images), Audacity (sound), and Blender (animation). After an initial look at many technologies, each student will choose a single project to focus on for the last third of the term. Prerequisite: None

Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019

A mathematical introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include automata such as Turing machines, formal languages such as context-free grammars, and computability questions as described by "NP-complete" problems and Godel's incompleteness theorem. This is an upper level course that presents the foundations of theoretical computer science. Expect practice with lots of mathematical proofs, with programming examples to build intuition.

  • Programming experience and some prior work in formal math

Gadgets: An Electronics & Microcontroller Lab
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2018

A hands-on exploration of interactive electronics with the Arduino programmable microcontroller and various sensors, motors, lights and switches which show the basics of circuits, coding, and the techniques behind the DIY (Do It Yourself) "Maker" culture. We will also do a bit of 3D modeling and printing. Required hardware : "SparkFun Inventor's Kit" ($100 at https://www.sparkfun.com/products/14265 )

Information Theory
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2017

An introduction to what computer scientists mean by "information", including information entropy, randomness, error correcting codes, data compression, and cryptography. This is an intermediate course in computer science and as such requires some background in programming as well as math through at least pre-calculus.

Internet Technologies
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2012

An introduction to the various technologies behind the internet, including HTML, CSS, TCP/IP, DNS, and a whole lot of other acronyms. The course will be roughly divided into two parts: one on web page creation, and the other on internet infrastructure along with a little history and culture. Depending on the background of the participants, we may also do a little JavaScript, the programming language that makes web pages "do" things. Further internet related work at Marlboro (such as the Web Programming class) builds on the material in this course.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER LOGIC & PROGRAMMING
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2009

By providing a solid grounding in computer logic and programming, this classlays the foundation for further work in computer science. Much as acompetency with English grammar is required for writing, an understanding ofprogramming is required for nearly all intermediate and advanced work incomputer science. A similar course is offered every fall, though thelanguage chosen varies from year to year. This semester starts from theground up, from number systems, to encoding data, to computer logic, toprogramming. The language for this semester is ECMAScript, more commonlyknown as JavaScript. It is a versatile scripting language that is part ofthe core toolset for the World Wide Web. Given its focus on interactivity,JavaScript allows for an integrated approach to learning procedural,object-oriented, and event-driven programming models in what is, perhaps, afamiliar development environment that provides immediate feedback whentrying to learn the language.

Introduction to Programming with Python
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

A first class in computer programming, and as such a foundation class for further work in computer science. Much as a competency with English grammar is required for writing, an understanding of programming is required for nearly all intermediate and advanced work in computer science. A similar course is offered every fall, though the language chosen varies from year to year. Python is a modern, elegant, high level scripting language, popular at Google among other places. In addition to learning about "object oriented programming", loops, input/output and all that, expect to also learn a variety of computer skills and basics.

Programming Workshop
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2018

The goal of the Programming Workshop is to improve your programming practice, bridging the gap between a beginner's understanding of the craft and those withintermediate to advanced skills. The workshop is often taken by both students who took Intro Programming in the Fall as well as those with more experience. Coding projects will be partly individual with feedback from other students and partly in groups, developing collaborative team coding skills. Possible topics include object oriented programming, functional programming, recursion, scope, threads and forks, web development, numerical methods, graphics and graphical user interfaces, version control, APIs, documentation, and testing, depending in part on the background and interests of the participants. The programming languages used varies but is typically Python, Javascript, or C. Other languages such as Lisp, R, Ruby, Java, Julia, Go, and Haskell are also possible but have been less common in this course. May be repeated for credit and taken for 2 to 4 credits.

  • Previous programming experience

Scientific Computing
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

Numerical simulations and data techniques have become increasingly important tools for understanding physical systems. This course explores these computer approaches to doing science. Topics include computational differential equations, chaos, fourier transforms, and statistical modeling. Prerequisite: Participants must have previous programming experience, math through at least calculus, and at least one semester of physics

Web Programming
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2014

Most internet content is generated dynamically by computer programs. We will explore the various technologies used to do this, including CGI scripts, SQL databases, and a bunch of other acronyms. The specific programming language(s) and tools we will look at will depend on the background and skills of the participants, but will include at least HTML, CSS, JavaScript. PHP, Ruby, and frameworks such as Rails are other likely possibilities.  Prerequisite: Some programming and internet experience

www.seminar
(3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2014

An open exploration of the core technologies and concepts behind the interent and the world wide web. This seminar is designed to provide a foundation for further internet related work such as web programming. Depending on their previous background, participants will work with topics such as creating web pages (e.g. HTML, CSS, hosting, graphics, design), networking (e.g. TCP/IP, DNS), content creation (e.g. WordPress, Wikipedia), web services (e.g. Google Analytics), and dynamic content (i.e. JavaScript) This course may be repeated for credit, and may be taken for 2 to 4 credits. Prerequisite: None

For Computer Science offerings, also see:

Combinatorics Study Group
Number Theory

Cultural History

After 9/11
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

This September marks the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 2001. Some scholars argue that a decade is needed to absorb a "national trauma." What cultural responses to the 9/11 attacks are evident in the past decade?

Through different media, cultural criticism and theory, we will explore changes in American culture since 9/11, including the tolerance of surveillance, anticipation of future attacks, commemoration and disaster tourism, and renewed nationalism and xenophobia in popular culture. Coursework will include film showings outside class, in-class reports and collaborative analysis, and substantial research projects. Prerequisite: Course work in the social sciences or humanities

Cultural History of Espionage
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2015

In international politics and popular culture, spies are figures of fascination and mystery. Fears of invasion, infiltration, and secret powers marked the beginning of the 20th century, fueling early spy stories and the creation of government spy agencies. Today, as through the past century, spy fictions – often written by former agents – offer a window on hidden history. We will explore spy fiction as reflections of historical situations and concerns of cultural modernity, including the growth, even normalization, of  spying and surveillance in society.

East-West Thinking
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2011

An exploration of cultural ideas of geography and history identifying the "East" and "West" with a focus on the Balkans and connections between European cultures and the Ottoman Empire and Turkey. We will use history, literature, and film, to discuss orientalism, "nesting orientalisms," and self-orientalizing, as part of multiculturalism, recent wars, and contemporary struggles over national identity. Prerequisite: Reading-centered coursework in the humanities or social sciences

Living with War
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2010

Though war seems extraordinary, it is an ordinary presence in our world. Whether distant or close at hand, war is part of how we understand the world. It creates social change and cultural reflection. How are the ruptures of war absorbed into society and culture? We will examine direct experiences of war, the struggles to recover cultural identity after a war, the celebration and memorializing of war as generations pass, and the pervasiveness of war imagery in popular culture. Prerequisite: A course in the social sciences or humanities

Modernity & Postmodernity in Cultural History
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2015

Reading of key texts in theory and cultural history on the characteristics and dynamics of modernity and postmodernity.  Prerequisite: Reading-centered coursework in social sciences or humanities

Political Rituals
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

Social life is structured by ritual, and never more so than in public politics. With an introduction to the core ideas of ritual studies, we will consider a cross-cultural selection of political rituals, mostly from the 20th century, and explore the rituals and spectacles of American political life, including a review of the Obama presidential campaign and contemporary observation and analysis of the Fall electoral season in the U.S.. Class discussion of readings and films, plus student research projects on a contemporary or historical topic in political ritual. Prerequisite: None

Reporting from the Frontline
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2013

To know the wider world, we depend upon the "news." Headlines, on-the-ground reports and visual images in the media shape our view of many societies. Reports from war zones are especially powerful, conveying urgency, danger and excitement, as war reporters take risks in foreign lands to "bring back the story." We grant them authority as eyewitnesses and explorers, and we see their accounts as "the first draft of history." How should we "read" the news? We'll discuss news narratives, cultural images conveyed by news stories, and the conditions and issues facing war reporters. We'll focus particularly on reporting from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, with background material from World War II, the Vietnam War and the Balkan wars of the 1990s. We will also consider contemporary changes in reporting, particularly the new role of "citizen journalism" via the internet and cellphones.

Russia & The Caucasus
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

"In Europe we are but parasites and slaves, but to Asia we shall come as masters," Dostoevskii wrote. The Russian empire (and the USSR) found its southern limits in the region of the Caucasus mountains, and the recent Russian-Georgian conflict is the latest in a two-hundred-year history of Russian incursions. In the 19th century Russians were inspired by the fierce resistance of the mountain people, the beauty of the land, and Orientalist fantasies of exotic cultures, creating a literary tradition from Pushkin to Tolstoi to Pasternak. By the 20th century, the Caucasus became the site of the first genocide of the twentieth century against the Armenians, a focal point of Islamic revival and armed conflict, a region of separatist wars in Armenia, Azerbiajan, Georgia, and Chechnia, and a center of oil politics (with the capital of Azerbiajan called the new Dodge City of the wild east). Considered the most culturally diverse area in the world, an ancient as well as modern crossroads, the Caucasus includes some of the oldest Christian nations, the traditional landing point of Noah's Ark and the land of the Golden Fleece, the mountains which form the wall between Europe and Asia, the birthplace of Stalin, and potentially the furthest reach of NATO and the EU. This course is an introduction to the Caucasus region, with Russian involvement as the connecting thread through the past two centuries to the present day. Prerequisite: Reading-intensive coursework. 

Spaces of Memory
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2013

A discussion of spaces significant to cultural memory, including places of commemoration, landscapes of ruins, invented sites of cultural “nostalgia,” and public spaces of ritual and display. We will combine a common reading list with readings contributed from individual Plan work. Substantial research projects and Plan writing. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

The Idea of Russia
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2012

An introduction to Russian history through key moments of change and touchstones of national identity and cultural memory.    From the early center of Kievan Rus to the rise of Moscow as “the third Rome,” to the invention of St. Petersburg as a “window on the West,” to expansion across Siberia, Central Asia, and the Caucasus, Russia grew from small villages to the largest continental empire in history.  We will consider cultural ideas of Russian identity that developed through this history, with special focus on nineteenth century debates about the future of Russia (Slavophiles and Westernizers; populists and Marxists) and on contemporary views of Russia as a unique “Eurasian” entity, reflected in nationalism today.   We will draw on the arts as well as historical writings, and individual papers may explore either.

Prerequisite: None

The Soviet Era Through Film and Memoir
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

The Soviet era represents a great social experiment, only recently abandoned. This course is an introduction to Soviet society and post-Soviet reaction, using memoir, film, and current studies to discuss the passage from early revolutionary radicalism to Stalinism to the end of the Cold War and contemporary "normalcy" and nostalgia. Prerequisite: Reading-centered coursework

TRAVELERS AND TOURISM
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

"Comes over one an absolute necessity to move," D.H. Lawrence wrote, "And what is more, to move in some particular direction." Traveling has always been part of human life, but how did it become a form of entertainment or leisure? Tourism today is one of the largest industries in the world; what is its impact on the way we organize societies, create and present our cultural identities, and envision the world of others? In this course, we'll explore the history of travel for pleasure, the nature of tourist experiences, the tales we tell of travel, and the ways people are changing their lives in response to tourism-- in cultural displays, social interactions, and commercial ventures like theme parks, packaged tours, television contests, and public stories of life as an accessible adventure. Prerequisite: Coursework in the humanities or social sciences

For Cultural History offerings, also see:

A History of Now
Advanced Medieval Studies
ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT & THEORY
HISTORY OF FOOD & CUISINE
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Literary Genres: Spain, Latin America, Equatorial Guinea
Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE
Jazz: History and Culture
Jewish, Christian, Muslim Relations
MUSIC: 1600-1800
SENSES OF PLACE
The Making of the Contemporary World
Western Music in the Last Century: Five Case Studies
Wine Dark Sea: Historiography of the Mediterranean

Dance

Anatomy of Movement
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

An introduction to human anatomy with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanical principles of movement. Concepts will be explored through a combination of scientific study, experiential anatomy, and dance movement. Prerequisite: None

Argentine Tango
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2017

Join us in an introduction to Argentine Tango - a popular social dance of improvisation in a close partnership. We will be dancing to both traditional and contemporary music. We (Jim & Sara) are part of the Brattleboro and Western Mass tango communities and so there also will be opportunities to dance off campus. Check out http://youtu.be/qqL911qU3VE for a taste.  May be repeated for credit.

Additional Fee:$0

Ballet
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2014

This multi-level ballet course will review for students the basic concepts required for the proper execution of ballet technique, including alignment, turnout, articulation of the knees and feet, and port de bras.  Basic ballet vocabulary and movement phrases will be reviewed and taught and the expectations and traditions specific to the progression of a ballet class will be followed.  Students who come into the class with a more advanced understanding of ballet technique will be given opportunities for and access to more advanced content within the class.  The class will promote strength and flexibility for the overall dancer while respecting each student's unique physical capacities within the demands of classical technique.

BEGINNING MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

How can your body move efficiently and powerfully through space?   What pathways of movement work with the skeletal structure of the body to create an easeful flow? How does becoming more aware of bodily sensations change your ability to control your own movement?   In this beginning modern dance course, we will spend our time learning by moving.  You will develop a basic vocabulary of movement principles that are used in contemporary dance performance and work on the ability to learn physically --  improving physical coordination, strength,flexibility, balance, and body awareness.   Supporting our study of movement techniques will be some personal movement exploration (through improvisation and choreography) and occasional readings or video viewings to contextualize our dancing. Prerequisite: None

CHOREOGRAPHING FOR GROUPS
(3.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2010

Students in this course will learn strategies for creating group choreographies and will direct groups of their peers in weekly projects. Course material will include both rehearsal strategies and compositional techniques for working with groups. The companion course, Performance Workshop, will provide student performers for the projects required by this class. Prerequisite: one semester of choreography class or permission of instructor

Choreography
(3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019

In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances, drawing on the dance traditions they have studied and gaining new tools and inspirations. Students will be encouraged to think deeply about what is valued in the dance forms they practice and what their own goals are as choreographers. We will work together to develop language to describe dances, so that we can sharpen our ability to observe and analyze choreographic choices and expand our own palettes as creators. Responding to weekly assignments and prompts, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and on exploring both tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, how to support others in reaching their own choreographic visions, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of established artists in a variety of forms through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester.   

  • Permission of the instructor

Choreography and Music
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances. Responding to specific assignments, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and when appropriate, on exploring tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of other artists through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester. The special topic for this semester is Music and its relationship to Choreography. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Contact Improvisation
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2018

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying and find access to our own strength and sensitivity. Prerequisite: None

Dance & Gender
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016

Exploring the ways in which gender is represented, constructed, and questioned through dance and the body.

Dance As Social Practice
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2017

This course examines the intersection of dance and social/political activism, focusing primarily on American dance performance, but taking detours into works from theater, visual art and other places and cultures. How can dance participate in addressing social issues? How has it done so in the past? Can dance actually spark social change? We will examine dances that bring social and political themes to the concert stage, dances that protest in the street, dances that challenge the politics of who gets to dance, and more. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include guest speakers, creative projects, field trips/service learning, and a research paper.

Dance in World Cultures
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019
Global Perspective

In this course, we will explore what dance means in a variety of cultures around the world and address the complexities inherent in studying dance forms from outside our own cultural traditions. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include a number of studio master classes with guest artists.

Dance Plan Performance Tutorial
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2010

Particpation in a senior Plan dance performance.

Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance Technique
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2015

In this course, we will develop expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of principles of contemporary release-based technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, initiating movement clearly, and maintaining a continuous sense of flow. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. This course combines intermediate and advanced level study, with students at the two levels assisting each other in learning. Prerequisite: Previous dance experience and permission of the instructor

PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2010

Dancers of all levels and styles are encouraged to sign up for this workshop to participate as performer in projects choreographed by their peers. Students who register for this course commit to being present for a set schedule of rehearsals and to performing in student projects throughout the semester. This workshop is the companion course to Choreographing for Groups.

REPERTORY
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

Students will participate in the creation of a new choreographic work directed by faculty member, Kristin Horrigan. The choreography will be performed at the end of the fall semester. The working title for this year’s repertory piece is "How big are YOUR feet?"

In this class, we will use choreographic process as a lens for examining the concept of carbon footprints and our own individual participation in the production of greenhouse gases. Through our research, we will explore the physicality inherent in the human aspects of this issue – our motivations, our actions, our relationships with the bigger picture. Out of our process together we will produce one or more performance pieces inspired by what we’ve learned and the questions we are asking. This artistic process will be directed by the instructor, however dancers will have an active role in creating material, imagining the direction of the work, and resolving the issues raised by engaging such a complex topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 

Senegalese Dance
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2018
Global Perspective

A movement course introducing African dance forms.

Economics

Economic Principles & Problems
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2014

Human beings have a unique power over nature and are endlessly creative in the way they interact with the world around them.  The world provides individuals and communities with resources and opportunities to accomplish a wide variety of goals.  Economics is the study of the decisions we make to accomplish our goals and how these decisions affect our communities and environment. This course is designed to demystify economics and give you useful economic tools to evaluate and contribute to the economic health of your communities. You will engage with a comprehensive introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics, acquainting yourself with the prevailing economic theories used to analyze the world’s economic problems.  We will appraise the strengths and limitations of simple economic models, with the ultimate goal of increasing your awareness and understanding of economic issues, improving your ability to evaluate various policy options, and helping you decipher political-economic discourse.  

ECONOMIC SYSTEMS
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2011

This course seeks to convey a sense of the discipline of Economics as a whole--its history, methods, and substantive concerns. The course examines processes common to all systems (e.g., division of labor, production, exchange, growth) and it examines whole systems as modeled and as observed. Prerequisite: None

ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS & POLICY
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2010

This course surveys the current state of the natural environment, develops a conceptual framework for understanding the environmental choices that face us, and examines the policy setting within which those choices are presently made. Although primary focus is on the U.S., considerable attention is paid to global problems and policies. A fifth credit may be earned by preparation of a substantial term paper applying the perspectives of the course to a policy issue. Prerequisite: Previous work in social science or environmental studies, or permission of instructor

INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

Economists, politicians, and pundits offer various and seemingly contradictory analysis and advice on the present state of the economy and the urgent policy challenges we face. Can we reconcile --or at least appreciate--these differences, and can we arrive at our own informed understanding? This course--offered as a group tutorial in Spring 2013-- draws on insights from economic theory, institutional analysis, and current events in considering such aspects of macroeconomic structure and performance as inflation, unemployment, growth, taxation, inequality, debt, money and credit, exchange rates, and trade policy. This course and Intermediate Microeconomics together constitute the core sequence in Economics normally required for Plan work in the field.  Prerequisite: Introductory economics or permission of instructor

Note: The "group tutorial" designation means that I expect a greater degree of collaborative engagement from students than I might otherwise expect in a course covering the same material.  For my planning purposes, I would appreciate hearing from interested students before the beginning of the semester.  

Intermediate Microeconomics
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2016

This intermediate level course concerns the market economy, in theory and practice. Topics include determination of prices, individual and collective decision-making, the organization and regulation of production and market failure. The course offers solid grounding in the theory and methods of economics as required for further work in the field.

  • Introductory economics or permission of instructor

PHILANTHROPY, ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY: THE NONPROFIT SECTOR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

The nonprofit sector includes museums, international aid agencies, colleges, environmental NGOs, foundations, cooperatives, homeless shelters, religious institutions, community development organizations, and health clinics, among many other types, but not all such organizations. And why these?  This course surveys the political economy of nonprofit organizations in the US and around the world -- their diversity and scope, reasons for being, sources of support, and varied roles in policy-making and value formation. Additionally, the course examines charity and philanthropy as practices closely intertwined with the nonprofit sector. Course readings will be supplemented by individual research projects.

Note:  This course qualifies students to apply for participation in the Graduate Center's Nonprofit Certificate program in Spring 2013. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Research Seminar in Economics
(1.00 Credit — Advanced)

Fall 2015

A seminar introducing students to current issues and methods in economics research. The majority of the seminar will be based on students reviewing and leading discussions of literature relevant to their research interests. Seminar can be taken for additional credit. Prerequisite: Statistics; Intermediate Microeconomics or Intermediate Macroeconomics

U.S. CAPITALISM
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2012

We live in interesting and challenging economic times. The U.S. and much of the world are in prolonged stagnation, with high unemployment, flat or declining incomes for most people, and great suffering. These are also times of great opportunity and great transition. Credit markets need to be revitalized, the role of government in the economy re-imagined, the relationship between workers and employers rethought, and global economic relations reconsidered.

This course offers an historical, institutional, and theoretical introduction to the U.S. economy, its problems and prospects. You are invited to 1) become familiar with the essential features of the U.S. economy and its place in the global system, 2) understand the basic elements of macroeconomic analysis, and 3) develop and defend policy approaches to current economic challenges.

This is the second half of an introductory sequence in economics.  There are no prerequisites, but priority will be given to students who completed Economic Systems in the fall.

 

For Economics offerings, also see:

Statistics
TOPICS IN U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
Who Owns the Land?

Environmental Studies

Agroecology Seminar
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014

We will develop a common base of knowledge in alternative agriculture through a variety of readings and presentations.  Additionally, each student will engage in a research project using the Marlboro College Farm or Greenhouse as a study site.  Possible ideas for research include intercropping, soil health, integrated pest management, biodynamic farming, no-till agriculture, permaculture, agroforestry, and biodiversity in agriculture.  Credits can range from 2-4.  In addition to the seminar time slot, we will meet one additional time each week based on student/faculty schedules to support the research projects.  Prerequisite: Previous work in the life sciences or permission of instructor

Environmental Studies Seminar: Imagining Water
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016
Global Perspective

During this seminar we will explore a theme of environmental interest from multiple disciplinary perspectives.  This semester's theme: water. Marlboro faculty with diverse curricular interests will present ideas on the theme during the first half of the semester. Students in the seminar will lead the second half of the semester; this may include presentations of work by others, original work, field trips, guest speakers or other ideas brought by students. The seminar is recommended to all students who intend to do Plan work in Environmental Studies but it is open to any interested students. The seminar offers an opportunity to engage with various Marlboro faculty members interested in the environment and to explore the interdisciplinary nature of Environmental Studies.

Note: Course meeting time will be determined at the start of the semester based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll

Future Energy
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

We will consider options for baseload (24-7) electric power when we are forced to close down fossil fuel power plants for the sake of the planet.   

Prerequisite: Some background in the sciences

How Environmentally Sustainable is Marlboro College?
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

In our Environmental Mission Statement we commit to "using energy efficiently and resources wisely." Do we? How do we know? In this course we critically compare different methods of assessing environmental impact and dig into the data to evaluate our performance. Through a combination of guest speakers and hands-on activities we range across many topics within sustainability at every level of the Marlboro community. These topics include energy, waste, food, transport, forestry and greenhouse gas emissions. Prerequisite: None

Inhabitations: An Introduction to Environmental Studies
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Designated Writing

Understanding the environmental challenges and opportunities of today’s world begins with careful inhabitation, or dwelling, within and upon specific places and texts. This course emphasizes local ecology and human communities through a series of visits to nearby environmental sites. Interdisciplinarity has long been a hallmark of the field of environmental studies; reflecting that tradition, "Inhabitations" is team-taught by faculty of multiple academic areas. This course is an important building block for environmental studies students and is also a designated writing course.

INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2013
Designated Writing

Sustainability is a widely used term suggesting the ability of a system to maintain itself or for a process to continue indefinitely. In this course, we will examine the ecological basis of sustainability in agricultural, forest, marine, and urban systems. Although our focus will be on ecological sustainability, we will explore this dimension while developing an awareness of the broader cultural and social contexts in which ecological sustainability takes place. Prerequisite: None

Natural History of Vermont
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

An "old fashioned" course where we will study the climate and landscape of Vermont and the kinds of things that live here. While studying all groups, each student will be asked to specialize on one taxon. There will be a lot of field work. Prerequisite: None

TOPICS IN U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

An exploration of major environmental themes and issues in U.S. History, from colonial times to the present. The inquiry is organized around a series of case studies that address such issues as land and land-use control, water resources, toxic substances, wildlife, and the environmental movement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Who Owns the Land?
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2010

This course examines changing ideas about land, competing claims over rights to land, and resulting patterns of land use and land-use control, primarily in the U.S. The course offers an historical overview but focuses primarily on topics of contemporary interest: zoning, eminent domain, and land-use planning (examining the case of Marlboro, VT); the "public-private" divide and the "wise use" movement; the tragedy of the commons; patterns of human settlement; and economic geography. Prerequisite: Previous work in social science or environmental studies or permission of instructor

For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

China's Problems Since Mao
Designing Fieldwork
Energy
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS & POLICY
Environmental Philosophy
ETHNOBIOLOGY
FOOD & CULTURE
Food, Waste, and Justice
General Biology I
General Biology II
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry I Lab - Exploration of Biofuels
General Ecology & Ecology Lab
Generators: The Literature of Energy
Imaging Water
Inequality and "Natural" Disasters
Intermediate Microeconomics
Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
Landscape Painting & Drawing
PHILANTHROPY, ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY: THE NONPROFIT SECTOR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
PLANTS OF VERMONT
Political Theory and the Ecological Crisis
The Land Ethic and Other Signs of Hope
WRITING SEMINAR: Interdisciplinary Science Writing
WRITING SEMINAR: Sense of Place in a Rapidly Changing World
Writing Seminar: Writing like a Mountain

Film

African Cinemas: Close-up on Colonialism
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

This course is designed to facilitate learning and critical analysis of how Africans revisit and treat their colonial past. In that regard, the course surveys different issues in order to acquaint students with Africa’s colonial past and the bearing of that legacy on its present and future. Those surveyed issues include violence, Africans’ portrayal by Westerners, the impact of colonialism on local communities (identity, education, language, social organization) and the present-day relationships between African countries and France. From the 1930s Hollywood movies like Tarzan and King Solomon’s Mines to African productions such as The Gods Must be Crazy or Identity Pieces, films are selected across historical and geographical boundaries to bring depth to the corpus.

In addition to screenings and discussions, coursework also includes analysis of texts.

Cinematography: Peter and John
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014

AVAILABLE TO MOVIES FROM MARLBORO STUDENTS - AND TO A LIMITED NUMBER OF REGULAR MARLBORO STUDENTS WHO SHOULD CONTACT JAY CRAVEN (jcraven@marlboro.edu) TO DISCUSS THEIR INTEREST.

For Film offerings, also see:

AMERICA ON STAGE AND SCREEN
Gender and Sexuality in Francophone Film

Film/Video Studies

Antonioni, Bresson, and Bunuel--Films of Desire and Transcendence
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2013

Filmmakers Michelangelo Antonioni, Robert Bresson and Luis Bunuel endure as three of the 20th Century’s most visionary and influential filmmakers, forging poetic narratives and aural landscapes that deeply probe themes of human connection and fallibility, alienation and faith, desire and transcendence.  

This class will examine work by each of these directors.  Titles include: Antonioni—Il Grido (1957), L’avventura (1960), La Notte (1961), L’eclisse (1962), Blow Up (1966), The Passenger (1975), Red Desert (1964), and Beyond the Clouds (1995).  Also Bresson: A Man Escaped (1956), Pickpocket (1959), Au Hazard Balthazar (1966), Diary of a Country Priest (1951), Mouchette (1967), The Devil, Probably (1977), and L’argent (1983).  And Bunuel: Los Olvidados (1950), Viridiana (1961), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), Un Chien Andalou (1929), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), Simon of the Desert (1965), and Belle de Jour (1967).  Students will be expected to read supporting materials, write weekly film assignments and exams, and participate in discussion.  Screenings and discussions will be held Wednesdays 6:30 to 9:30pm.  There will also be an additional weekly out-of-class screening to be announced.  Prerequisite: None

Additional Fee:$25

Cinematography Workshop
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2010

This group tutorial will focus on the theory and practice of cinematography for narrative, documentary, or experimental applications—using the motion picture camera to capture imaginative, expressive, and affecting images. Weekly activities will include shooting assignments; in-class critiques; readings; screenings; and discussion. Students who plan to work as cinematographers for the Marble Hill web TV series are strongly encouraged to enroll. Assigned text: Blain Brown’s Cinematography: Theory and Practice. Image Making for Cinematographers, Directors, and Videographers.

DIRECT CINEMA
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2010

Direct cinema is a kind of documentary filmmaking that records spontaneous observation of naturally occurring events. It challenges the filmmaker to engage the audience without resorting to formal interview, voice over, or pre-conceived structure that shapes documentaries to resemble narrative films, with rising and falling action.

In this class, students will be expected to each make three short direct cinema documentaries on subjects of their choosing. We'll also watch and discuss examples of direct cinema by the Al and David Maysles (Salesman, Gimme Shelter, Grey Gardens), Frederick Wiseman (High School, Welfare, Belfast, Maine), D.A. Pennebaker (Don't Look Back, The War Room), Barbara Kopple (American Dream, Harlan County, U.S.A.), and others. Prerequisite: Previous film study or permission of instructor

Documentary Film--Theory and Practice
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2012

This class will explore the theory and practice of documentary filmmaking through an examination of cinema verite, direct cinema, reflexive documentary, compilation films, mock documentary, and experimental/poetic documentary.  We'll also explore various visual strategies in documentary filmmaking aimed at effectively communicating theme, tone, and characterization.

Through readings and discussions, we’ll study various aspects of social, ethical, and philosophical issues surrounding non-fiction film and video -- the blurring of boundaries between reality and fiction; questions of documentary truth; power relations between filmmaker and subject; effective interviewing; and the role of film in constructing and defining cultural history and memory.

Students will be expected to complete a series of readings, writings, and documentary production assignments.  The primary text for the course will be Michael Rabiger’s book, Directing the Documentary, which is available in the bookstore. 

Films that will be assigned or screened in part or in whole include Dziga Vertov’s  Man With a Movie Camera; Chris Marker’s San Soleil; Stan Brakhage’s Birth; Su Friedrich’s Sink or Swim; The Maysles’ Salesman; David Sutherland’s Country Boys; Amanda Wilder’s Approaching the Elephant; Ross McElwee’s Sherman’s March; Frederick Wiseman’s  Belfast, Maine; Jonathan Caouette’s Tarnation; Barbara Kopple’s Harlan County, USA; Steve James’ Hoop Dreams; Peter Watkin’s War Game; Erroll Morris’ Thin Blue Line and Fast Cheap and  Out of Control; Morgan Spurlock’s Super Size Me and Christopher Guest’s Best in Show and Waiting for Guffman.

Film Acting, Directing, & Cinematography - Marble Hill
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2013

Students will work to produce a series of ten-minute episodes for a web-based TV comedy series, Marble Hill. Actors, directors, cinematographers, sound recordists, music composers, and others are encouraged to enroll, so that students can work in groups where they collaborate and draw on each others interests and abilities. The goal of this class is to advance production skills development and facilitate the students’ acquisition of the means to achieve more disciplined expression in narrative film. This will involve focused work in film acting, directing, script development, camera coverage, lighting, sound recording, design, and editing.Student production teams will participate in pre-production planning, location scouting, shot listing, casting, rehearsal, production and post-production. The class will include screenings of outside material and exercises intended to sharpen students’ imaginative capacities and intuitive instincts. Completed episodes that meet rigorous technical and creative standards will be posted online through YouTube and other outlets. Prerequisite: Previous film and/or acting study or experience, or by permission of the instructor

Film Editing Workshop
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

This workshop will provide students with hands-on opportunities to edit episodes of the Marble Hill comedy series and, by doing so, enhance their skills and theoretical background. Students will be given weekly assignments that focus on particular aspects of cutting narrative material. Emphasis will be given to the idea of orienting the viewer fully in the scene, through the establishment of mood and place, timing narrative articulation and pacing, and character development. Outside films will also be screened to illustrate editing technique. Students who wish may also work on their own projects and bring them into class for review and critique. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Group Tutorial: Thinking Like A Producer
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2013

Students will enroll in this group tutorial to advance individual projects based on ideas for narrative, documentary, or experimental films.  The focus here will be to function as a producer, shaping the vision, mobilizing resources, and successfully executing plans for production.  Class time will be spent brainstorming, reviewing and critiquing plans, works-in-progress, and finished films.  Producers may also play additional roles in the production, as writer, director, cinematographer, etc.  Or they may bring others onto their teams.  But each student's primary role will be as the person to make the production happen.  Prerequisite: None

Group Tutorial: The Films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

Rainer Werner Fassbinder died at the age of 37 but he made 44 films during the 16 years of his career. Fassbinder’s films helped define the ground-breaking New German Cinema of the late 1960’s and 70’s. They explore complicated relationships, historical memory in a nation still emerging from trauma, and gender roles in a time of shifting cultural mores. For this group tutorial, we’ll view Fassbinder’s monumental 15-hour Berlin Alexanderplatz and also study various of his feature films, including Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Effi Briest, In a Year of 13 Moons, Veronika Voss, and The Merchant of Four Seasons.

 All film screening will take place outside of class. Students will be expected to arrive having screened the film(s) and read the assigned text. Grades will be based on classroom participation and written analysis and critiques. Prerequisite: Admission to this group tutorial will be by permission of the instructor

New Hollywood Films
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2011

The 1960's American film movement combined independent sensibilities with studio distribution that made possible the most creative period in Hollywood history. Influenced by the French New Wave and other European filmmakers, the New Hollywood included John Cassevetes, Martin Scorcese, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert Altman, Brian DePalma, Dennis Hopper, Woody Allen, George Lucas, Arthur Penn, Paul Schrader, Terrence Mallick, and others. The films scheduled for screening include Bonnie and Clyde (1967), The Graduate (1967), Easy Rider (1969), Chinatown (1974), Annie Hall (1977), Five Easy Pieces (1970), Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974), American Graffitti (1973), The Conversation (1974), Badlands (1973), The Last Picture Show (1971), Woman Under the Influence (1974), Blue Collar (1978), and Sisters (1973).

Students will be expected to write weekly film critiques that engage the picture and develop a personal response that enlarges our thinking. The class is open to all interested students-with an enrollment cap of 12.

Nobody Loses All the Time: Obsession and American Crime Film
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014

This course will be taught by Justin Harrison as part of his Plan. What drives people to commit crimes?  Why are crimes so often the result of someone's drive to fulfill their heart's desire?  American crime film has long been interested in the intersection between crime and obsession, and that interest has lead to some of the greatest movies ever made.  This eight-week class will explore that intersection and some of those films.  Students will discuss the the content and craft of each picture both on their own and in relation to the other films being discussed.  In addition to the in class discussions, there will be short weekly writing assignments and a final paper on a film of the student's choice.  The films discussed will include work by Kathryn Bigelow, Sofia Coppola, David Fincher, Martin Scorsese and others. Note: Given the subject matter, most of these films deal with some heavy content.  Please keep that in mind with regard to whether or not this class is for you.

Class will meet twice a week; discussions on Tuesdays will alternate with film viewing on Fridays. Prerequisite: None

SCREENWRITING
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2013

Effective screenwriting requires an understanding of story structure and an ability to shape character, theme, tone, and incident to dramatic effect. This class will focus on the regular practice of story and screenplay development, through writing exercises, character research, narrative construction, and regular revision aimed at producing scripts that can be made into films, using available resources. Emphasis will be on writing scripts of twenty or fewer pages, so that they can be regularly critiqued by the instructor and other students, and re-written to maximize impact. Students will also read and discuss produced screenplays and screen associated films and excerpts.  Prerequisite: Previous creative writing experience or permission of instructor

Additional Fee: $25

Screenwriting Workshop
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2010

This class will continue work started last spring, for any interested writing students, whether or not they participated in that class. Our plan will be to develop characters and dramatic/comedic incidents set on the campus of the small fictional New England liberal arts college, Marble Hill. Completed material that meets rigorous standards for shaping and revision will be considered for production through the on-campus productions class running concurrently – and for possible TV, cable, and radio production. Classroom sessions will include brainstorming, critique, and study of effective screenwriting technique – aimed at the development of scripted scenes and sequences that shape character, theme, tone, and incident to dramatic and comedic effect. Outside scripts and produced episodes will also be studied and discussed. Students may enroll in this workshop for 2 or 4 credits, depending on the amount of work they are prepared to undertake and complete. Pre-requisite: Submission of a writing sample. Pre-requisite: Submission of a writing sample.

THE FILMS OF CHARLIE CHAPLIN
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

Comic trailblazer Charlie Chaplin appeared on movie screens within ten years of the medium's birth and before film was even considered an art form. But Chaplin broke new ground on many fronts, rendered unique and poignant moments in American history, and achieved global popularity as the first "world figure," recognized in all continents for his trademark, the Little Tramp. The former music hall comedian also survived the advent of sound movies, because he owned his own studio, and he produced some of his most enduring cinema when other silent film actors were out of work.

This class will include screenings of The Unknown Chaplin (1983), that explores the filmmaker's working methods - and the major Chaplin shorts, including Easy Street (1917), Shoulder Arms (1918), The Pilgrim (1923), and The Immigrant (1917). Also, the Chaplin features: The Kid (1921), The Gold Rush (1925), The Circus (1928), City Lights (1931), Modern Times (1936), The Great Dictator (1940), Monsieur Verdoux (1947), Limelight (1952), and A King in New York (1957).

The class is open to all interested students and has an enrollment cap of 12.

The Films of Robert Altman
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

Filmmaker Robert Altman broke stylistic ground and provided unique social commentary with his naturalistic, circular, and multi-layered narratives of fringe characters pursuing off-beat articulations of the American dream. Viewed as controversial, outspoken, and irreverent, Altman was nevertheless loved by actors, for the freedom he gave them. And a devoted legion of critics and fans applauded his unconventional cinema-style and open-ended explorations of society and culture.  Pictures slated for screening include MASH (1970), 3 Women (1977), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971), The Player (1992), Nashville (1975), Short Cuts (1993), The Long Goodbye (1973), Secret Honor (1984), Vincent and Theo (1990), Gosford Park (2001), California Split (1974), A Wedding (1978), and The Gingerbread Man (1998).

The Literature of Northern New England
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

The main goal of this survey course is to introduce students to the literature and culture of northern New England, and to cultivate sharpened critical reading and writing skills. We'll read novels, shortstories, essays, and poetry that explore and illuminate the character, place, history, and culture of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. As we read and discuss these texts we will consider the questions: To what extent is there a North Country character and culture that is truly distinctive, compared to other parts of the country? In what ways do New England writers develop themes that resonate universally—and what has been their contribution to an improved understanding of the American experience? How do the writers of northern New England advance, subvert, or interrogate the mythology of the region—and what is that mythology? What images of race, gender, family, and social class do we carry away from this sampling of the region's literature?

Several of the writers we'll be reading will visit classes and lead discussion. Students will be expected to fully read and discuss assigned texts and associated critical materials. Attendance and completion of weekly written assignments and two longer papers will also be required. Texts include Russell Banks' The Sweet Hereafter,Annie Proulx's Heartsongs and Other Stories, Richard Russo's Nobody's Fool, Ernest Hebert's The Dogs of March, Jeffrey Lent's In the Fall, Gretchen Gerzina's Mr. and Mrs. Prince, Craig Nova's Cruisers, and Howard Frank Mosher's Where the Rivers Flow North. Also poetry by Galway Kinnell, Adrienne Rich, Robert Frost, Hayden Carruth, and David Budbill. Films will also be screened for The Sweet Hereafter, Nobody's Fool, and Where the Rivers Flow North. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

The Psychological Thriller
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2012

The psychological thriller explores social relationships under pressure. Often they explore aspects of uncovering the unknown in other people—between a character and his/her intimate others, family and friends, or mysterious strangers.  This class will screen and discuss films that explore these dynamic and often dark relationships, which can reveal universal truths.

Films planned for screening, in or out of class, include: Henri Cluzot’s Diabolique, Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train, Dial M for Murder, and Psycho, Martin Scorcese’s Cape Fear, Atom Egoyan’s Exotica, David Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers, Patrice Leconte’s Monsieur Hire, Cedric Kahn’s Red Lights, Lawrence Kasdan’s Body Heat, Roman Polanski’s Death and the Maiden, Georges Sluizer’s The Vanishing, Robert Altman’s The Player, David Lynch’s Mullholland Drive, Claude Chabrol’s La Ceremonie, Stephen Frears’ Dirty Pretty Things, and Morten Tyldum’s Headhunters.

Prerequisite: None

For Film/Video Studies offerings, also see:

Digital Multimedia

Gender Studies

For Gender Studies offerings, also see:

Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective
Dance & Gender
Gender Trouble: Women writers of the Americas, a comparative approach
Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE

History

A HISTORY OF FAMINE
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

In this course, we will survey a number of famines and food shortages from ancient Rome to modern Africa, looking at the changing nature of famines throughout history as well as some persistent similarities. The course will investigate the human and natural causes of famine, the experience of starvation and economic displacement and the attempts by governments and individuals to avoid and ameliorate shocks to the food supply. Particular attention will be paid to economic and social theories of famine and how they affect historical interpretation and modern food aid. Previous coursework in history, economics or political science helpful but not required. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

Advanced Medieval Studies
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2010

Intended to further advanced work towards a Plan in history or medieval studies, students in this course will build on the background acquired in Introduction to Medieval Studies and expand their knowledge of the techniques used to study the European past during the middle ages. We will cover in greater details techniques including manuscript work, paleography, diplomatics, and archeology. Students will spend part of the semester preparing a research project in their area of interest which will then be presented and discussed as part of the introductory course. An additional weekly 1-hour meeting to be scheduled. Some knowledge of Latin would be helpful, but is not required. Prerequisite: Medieval Studies or permission of instructor

Agriculture Before the Industrial Revolution
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

In this course we will look at a selection of topics covering agricultural practices in a variety of cultures and time periods up to the end of the 18th century.  The initial topic will look at the earliest shift from hunter/gatherer or mobile agriculture practices to sedentary agriculture in the Middle East.  Subsequent topics will be chosen by the students in the course but might include Roman Agronomics, the grain supply in the Roman Empire, Muslim Agronomics, the Muslim "Green Revolution," agriculture in "feudal" Europe, the crisis of the 14th century, the Columbian exchange, causes of famine, European Agricultural technology on the eve of the Industrial Revolution, and possibly comparisons with agronomic practices in non-industrialized societies today.  Student work will involve in class presentations and a research paper in an area of their choosing.

Prerequisite: Intro work in History or related field

Early Modern Europe
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2017
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

This course will provide an introduction of the study of history focused on Europe from Columbus to the beginning of the 20th century. Prior to mid-terms, we will cover major elements in the development of European nations and peoples including religious changes, imperial expansion, economic systems, and cultural identity. After this basic timeline, students in the course will choose and present on several areas that will be covered in greater depth. Options might include but are not limited to: Early Navigation, the Reformation, Enlightenment Philosophy, the 17th Century Crisis, Sex and Gender, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution or others.  These topics will include a presentation of a historiographic debate and will frequently be student led.

  • none

HISTORY OF FOOD & CUISINE
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

This course will cover ideas of taste and choices of cuisine as they affected events and cultural change over the last millenium as well as the tools historians have used to study the history of food. European and American history will be the focus, but we will also explore a selection of other global cuisines. Different societies and historical eras all had their own styles and preferences and these brought about trade links, conquests, global reorganizations and shifts in both aesthetic and material culture. We will also ask what the study of "high" culture food can tell us about the cultural life of both the past and our own society. Some cooking will be involved.

History, Memory, and Identity in Spain and the Atlantic World
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

Students in this course will learn how to investigate the role that history plays in contemporary identity.  Focusing on Spain and Latin America will highlight several major debates about identity that revolve around events often in the distant past, but that continue to shape cultural identity into the present day: the role of Muslim culture in Spain, language and nationalism, colonialism and indigenous identity, and the shadow of the Spanish civil war - an event with resonance well beyond the Spanish speaking world.  Because cultural identity receives expression in many ways, each of these topics will cover a combination of literature and primary and secondary historical sources, as well as using art, music, and film to investigate the creation of modern identities.  In addition, the course should provide students an overview of Spanish history from the late medieval period to the end of the colonial period.  For students that have taken Spanish, some readings, discussion, and writing can be done in Spanish.

This course will be accompanied by a spring break trip to Madrid and Cordoba in Spain.  Attendance on the trip is by advanced application only.  Students may request to take the course without going on the trip, but this will depend on the number of trip applicants and specific arrangement with the faculty.  Please contact Rosario de Swanson or Adam Franklin-Lyons with further questions.  Prerequisite: By application only

Jewish, Christian, Muslim Relations
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2010

Viewed alternately as an idyllic time of cultural cooperation - such as in the poetry and art of Andalusia - or as the foundation of the eternal conflicts between the Abrahamic religious sects - from the Crusades to the Inquisition - medieval religious relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims have been a point of broad contention among medievalists for decades. Through a variety of primary and secondary sources we will investigate the changing social conditions that helped to create religious interactions ranging from cooperation to violence. Topics will include the Crusades, Spanish Convivencia, sermon writing, literary production, and legal culture, among others. These medieval antecedents all resonate clearly in the modern world and often provide the historical/mythic backdrop to contemporary debates on continuing modern conflicts from Israel/Palestine to Afghanistan. While the focus of the course will be the complexities of medieval religious relationships, the end of the course will spend time looking directly at how the medieval past gets used in the framing of modern political rhetoric. Prerequisite: Introductory course in history, religion or equivalent

Local History
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

By focusing on the historical archives and primary source material available here in Windham county, students will be able to do genuine historical research based in the archives of our local townships. Throughout the semester, we will look at the history of Vermont, Marlboro, Brattleboro, and the college itself through a variety of lenses including natural history, archeology, photography, and archival work. We will discuss persistent questions addressed through local and micro-history as well as focus on the more advanced techniques useful in all areas of historical research. The long Thursday afternoon timeslot will be used to visit to several historical societies and museums. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Sex and Gender in Late Medieval Europe
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

In this course, we will investigate the late medieval conceptions of sex, gender identity, ideas about love, and legal restrictions on sexuality and behavior.  The course will cover four broad categories: Ideas about sex, Female identity, Male identity, and Queer identity.  Reading both primary and secondary sources across these topics, we will look at what did and did not count as sex.  We will seek to better understand the limits and acceptable rolls placed on both men and women in their participation in the family, in the medieval church, and in the institutions of society.  Readings will also cover the ways in which religious and secular institutions regulated behavior through legal and other means.  Finally, we will look at debates about sexual behavior outside the commonly sanctioned procreative sex of heterosexual marriage, focusing primarily, but not exclusively, on historiographic debates about homosexuality.  The course will be run in more of a tutorial style with students often being responsible for choosing their own readings to create a general group discussion. Prerequisite: At least one introductory history course

The Making of the Contemporary World
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

The seminar will follow five paths through the years 1870-1970 to illuminate the development of several issues in the contemporary world. These paths will include three French republics and their army, Japan in the Pacific, the British in Asia, the question of Palestine, and the United States becomes a world power. This class fulfills the WSP course requirement for The Origins of the Contemporary World. Prerequisite: Previous work in American Studies, Cultural History, Asian Studies or permission of the instructor

Wine Dark Sea: Historiography of the Mediterranean
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2018
Global Perspective

Not a history of the many cultures that have existed around the Mediterranean--Roman, European, Arab, Turkish--but rather a course about the sea itself, we will look at what and why scholars have written with fascination and even love about the "Middle Sea." 20th century historiography has often sought to portray the multitude of nations and peoples who have populated the Mediterranean since ancient Rome as inextricably linked, through geography, environment, economy and even in anthropological descriptions of culture. The discourse of interconnectedness in turn influenced thinkers and writers studying everything from Japan to the 17th century Atlantic. In this course we will survey the idea of Mediterranean unity, debates about the nature of "Europe" and some of the philosophical assumptions that make up large historical narratives. The final project for this course is a group research project.

  • Courses in History, Art History or related and permission of instructor

For History offerings, also see:

A Frog Jumps In: Seminar in Japanese History & Culture
A History of Now
After 9/11
ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT & THEORY
Brush, Sword, and Hoe: Ancient Chinese History & Culture
CHINA'S PROBLEMS SINCE MAO
Contemporary Political & Social Thought
Cultural History of Espionage
Dark Twins: The Underside of Asian Urbanization
East-West Thinking
EVERYDAY LIFE IN LATIN AMERICA
Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities
First Contact: Voices of America's Frontiers
Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
Living with War
Modern Chinese History & Culture
Modernity & Postmodernity in Cultural History
MUSIC: 1600-1800
Origins of the Contemporary World
Political Rituals
Rethinking Rome: Power, Society, and Faith in the High Roman Empire
Rice, Ritual, & Revolution: A Survey of Southeast Asian History
Russia & The Caucasus
The Soviet Era Through Film and Memoir
TOPICS IN U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
TRAVELERS AND TOURISM

Interdisciplinary

A History of Now
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

If history is a study of the past to inform the future, how do we see the present? How might we define our own era?  This course is an exploration of the contemporary world with an eye to what seems important now and what a future historian might see as characteristic of this time. We've chosen four broad categories for our discussions: urbanism (megacities, public spaces, politics of the street); mobility (tourism , displacement, diaspora);  catastrophe (climatic and political, tsunamis, terrorism); and visuality (display, digital, surveillance).  We will also touch on contemporary inclinations to engage history as a subject of cultural play.  Individual student projects and collaborative discussions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Anatomy of Movement
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

An introduction to human anatomy with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanical principles of movement. Concepts will be explored through a combination of scientific study, experiential anatomy, and dance movement. Prerequisite: None

ETHNOBIOLOGY
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

Ethnobiologists explore how people in different societies think about and use plants and animals and, as such, their discipline falls at the intersection of biology and anthropology. Historically, the work of ethnobiologists has focused in large part on human uses of plants (ethnobotany) and, in particular, the description of plant uses in "exotic" societies, often without much attention to the cultural values, social relations, and conservation issues surrounding these uses. In this class, we will consider a range of topics including taxonomies, land use, healing, and intellectual property rights and hope to go beyond "mere" description of practices to a deeper social, cultural, and biological analysis of the interaction of humans with plants and animals. Case studies will be drawn from around the world. Prerequisite: none

Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014

This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism, and others. This course can compliment any year of course work.  Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses - it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management
(2.00 Credits — Graduate)

Fall 2016

Students will master the fundamental elements of running a nonprofit agency. Topics include: Leadership, Conflict Resolution, Marketing, Donor Fundraising, Grants and Earned Income, Financial Management for Nonprofits, Strategic Planning, Human Resources, and Boards and Governance. The class will meet at the Marlboro College Graduate School in downtown Brattleboro on 10 Fridays during the spring term, each time from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Students will be assessed on the basis of three elements: (1) participation in the face-to-face workshops, (2) active engagement in ten time-limited online discussion forums, and  (3) submission of a 3-5 page reflective essay synthesizing the knowledge gained in the workshop and other undergraduate coursework. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a professional development certificate in nonprofit management issued by the Marlboro College Graduate School, and will be prepared to take a leadership role in any mission-driven organization.

Undergraduate enrollment in Fundamentals of Nonprofit Management will be capped at 6 students. Priority will be given first to students who were enrolled in Jim Tober's Philanthropy, Advocacy and Public Policy seminar spring 2011; then to students who were enrolled in Meg Mott's Political Theory and the Ecological Crisis course fall 2011; and thereafter to students for whom this could be a Plan course; sophomores or juniors; and students with experience working in the nonprofit sector. 

Prerequisites: Attendance of Introduction to Nonprofit Leadership Workshop, 8:45-5:00 on MLK Day 2012 (Jan 16); Enrollment by permission of instructor: please email abrooks@marlboro.edu to apply.

Gender and Sexuality in Francophone Film
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2012

This course is designed to facilitate learning and critical analysis of how gender and sexuality are represented in Francophone communities. This course surveys cultural issues and representations, through the filmic medium, in order to acquaint students with the diversity inherent in the French-speaking world. Emphasis is on gender roles, the condition of women, portrayals of homosexuality, and the power struggle that exists between the center and the margins. Selected films from Africa, Europe, the Caribbean and Quebec will studied from an aesthetic and cultural perspective.

In addition to in-class film screenings and discussion, students will create and maintain an electronic media project on “Gender and Sexuality” on the Critical Commons platform. Using the media sharing capabilities of Critical Commons, students will gather relevant film clips and post critical commentaries that will constitute an online academic source of reference for research.

Class discussion will be in English. Students can earn an additional credit by completing assignments in French and will be expected to use French key sources.

Happy Endings: an exploration of dramatic closure
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

". . . and they lived happily ever after"  Or perhaps not despite the joyous last scene?  We will sample a variety of theatre works (including a musical or two) and films that may be described as having a "happy ending."  We will explore how dramatic narratives are constructed to support uplifting resolutions and/or satisfying conclusions.  We will ponder whether certain kinds of characters, situations, and conditions (including those related to design and patterns of speech) are necessary to achieve positive closure. Investigations will embrace considerations of selected comedies, romances, and dramas.  Class discussion will be supported by readings and mini-projects aligned with the scripts and movies on our list.

Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2013

A course for those interested in creating and interpreting maps.  The course will cover the history of map making, how people currently portray spacial information, and some of the mathematical choices involved in map design.  We will work with primitive tools such as pencil and paper as well as GIS platforms for mapping and statistical information.  Students will create a variety of actual maps over the course of the semester. Prerequisite: None

Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II
(6.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2015

This is the second half of a year-long course, reading and discussion of the major works of western culture from Old Testament to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy I or permission of instructor

TMI? Navigating information in the social and natural sciences
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

As scholars, we both consume and contribute to the body of recorded human knowledge. In this course, we'll take a look at the customs and structures underlying that body of knowledge, leading to a better understanding and more effective use of information in your work at Marlboro. We'll tackle everything from dusty print reference books to online data sets as we learn how scholarly information is structured and hone our searching and retrieval skills. We'll consider issues such as copyright, open access, and academic honesty. We'll take a field trip to another academic library (or two, or five) in the region to compare and contrast how libraries work. Students will have the opportunity to apply what we learn to an area of academic interest, completing one or more projects that could feed directly into a future tutorial or Plan paper. The course will be co-taught by the library director and a rotating group of faculty from the social and natural sciences. Highly recommended for students who anticipate writing a Plan in these areas. (This course is analogous to "Finding Stuff," which focuses on the humanities; if you've taken that one, let's talk before you register for this one.)

Languages

ADVANCED CHINESE I
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2013

This course aims to develop students’ communicative skills through reading essays in contemporary Chinese culture and literature.

Beginning Modern Arabic IA
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2018
Global Perspective

Introduces students to the phonology and script of classical/modern standard Arabic and covers the basic morphology and syntax of the written language. Emphasis on the development of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at the earliest stages. Samples of modern (contemporary) and classical styles of writing introduced, and audio-visual material from the contemporary Arabic media. Prerequisite: None

Beginning Modern Arabic IB
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016
Global Perspective

In this course, the focus is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures and some cultural and historical knowledge . The course is also designed to primarily develop conversation skills. Available only to students with prior Arabic instruction.

Cinemas for French conversation
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

This Intermediate-High level course is designed to primarily develop conversation skills. Film is used a way to initiate and develop classroom discussion in French. In the process, students will not only develop the four language skills, but also will be exposed to the different Francophone cultural contexts. Films selected include features and TV shows from Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Louisiana and the Caribbean.

Classroom activities include screening, discussion and writing about movies. We will also review linguistic concepts and/or grammar points pertaining to each movie.

Prerequisite: Intermediate

Composition, Conversation & Culture
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

(Writing and speaking intensive) Although this course is centered on written expression in Spanish, conversation and discussion of short stories from selected Latin American and Spanish writers will serve as models for writing styles. The course reviews briefly difficult grammatical structures or idiomatic usages, sentence and paragraph structure, and making smooth transitions through writing. Using the selected literary texts, we will write short descriptions and narratives, learn how to incorporate dialogue in a short story as well as styles for personal or business correspondence. We will analyze literary texts, do library research and draft and complete full literary research papers. Students will comment on each other's work in the classroom to practice techniques of self-editing and self-criticism. This course serves as one of the foundations for advanced literary studies in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least three semesters of college Spanish, or equivalent or permission of instructor

EASING BACK INTO SPANISH II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

 This course is a follow up to Easing Back into Spanish I. It is designed for those who have taken Spanish before but would like a review before formally entering the Intermediate levels. The course covers the five core areas of language learning: grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity within the Spanish speaking world.

Elementary Chinese I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

This course is for beginners. It is designed to help students develop communicative competence in the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures used in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. Students will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

An additional 50 minutes a week is to be added. The specific time is based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll and the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Elementary Chinese II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2013

 This is the second half of first-year Chinese. Its aim is still to help students to develop communicative competence in the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Chinese language. Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Students continue to learn Chinese characters as well as pinyin in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

Prerequisite: Elementary Chinese I or permission of the instructor

Elementary French I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016
Global Perspective

This four credit introductory course is for beginning students who wish to develop the basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures, cultural and historical knowledge. 

Elementary French II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016

This course is the continuation of Elementary French I. This course builds on and expands language and cultural skills learned in the first semester. Students will continue to develop their basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures and cultural and historical knowledge. Required textbook: Chez Nous: Branché sur le monde francophone, 4/E, 2014.

  • Elementary French I or permission of instructor

Elementary Spanish I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Global Perspective

This is a language course for first-year students of Spanish and is designed to aid development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. It is part of a year-long course that covers basic grammar along with a variety of vocabulary and cultural topics, and it prepares students for the second-semester Spanish.  In addition to written work and exercises, students are expected to complete home-work assignments in the Vistas website. The course meets three times a week for an hour and twenty minutes plus one hour extra for conversation.

Elementary Spanish II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019
Global Perspective

Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I.  Prerequisite: One semester of Spanish or some prior Spanish

  • Elementary Spanish I or equivalent
  • A semester of college Spanish
  • Instructor's permission

French Conversation and Writing
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

In this course, the emphasis will be to improve one’s speaking and writing skills on both a formal and informal level. In that regard, there will be a variety of reading, listening and speaking activities for students to build their language competencies. The course will also provide opportunities to review some tenses and to master more complex syntactical structures of the French language. In addition, the class will watch short films and current news as a way to foster cultural competency.

No partial credit will be offered for this class.

Required Textbook: Imaginez 2nd edition (2012) by Cherie Mitschke 

GENDER TROUBLE: MODERN WOMEN WRITERS IN LATIN AMERICA & AFRO-HISPANIC DIASPORA
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2013

Ever since feminists called attention to women's lives,the question of what it means to be a woman has been the subject of much academic debate. However, despite improvement in women's lives and shared similarities, the experience of being a woman differs markedly. Issues such as gender,race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and sexual orientation seem to account for these differences. We will examine issues of gender, race,identity, nationality, and sexual orientation in the work of selected writers. We will also consider the ways in which gender, race, and historical and cultural specificity shape and complicate these categories of inquiry. We will also readpoetry, short stories and essays by women writers. Prerequisite: Prior intermediate courses and ablility to read and write well in Spanish, permission of the instructor.

Grammar as Science
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

This course is an introduction to syntax as an exercise in scientific theory construction. It engages general intellectual themes present in all scientific theorizing as well as those arising specifically within the modern cognitive sciences. It covers such core topics in syntax as phrase structure, constituency, the lexicon, inaudible elements, movement rules, and transformational constraints, while emphasizing scientific reasoning skills. Prerequisite: None

Intermediate Arabic
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

Available only to students with prior Arabic instruction.

Intermediate Chinese I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

This course is the continuation of Elementary Chinese II. Students will continue to learn more skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will still be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language.

An additional 50 minutes a week is to be added. The specific time is based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll and the instructor.

Prerequisite: Elementary Chinese II or consent of instructor

Intermediate Chinese II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

This course is the continuation of Intermediate Chinese I. Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language.Prerequisite: Intermediate Chinese I or permission of the instructor

Intermediate French I
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2015

Intermediate French I is designed as a second-year French course for students have completed first-year French or its equivalent. Students will strengthen their language skills and cultural competency through vocabulary, grammar and readings. You will contribute to the classroom community by using French in and out of class, collaborating with classmates, and taking responsibility for timely completion of all assignments, quizzes, compositions, projects, and tests. No reduced credits will be offered for this class.

Intermediate Modern Arabic IIA
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018
Global Perspective

A continuation of elementary Arabic with equal emphasis on aural and oral skills, reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Arabic media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. Prerequisite: Beginning Arabic or the equivalent

Intermediate Modern Arabic IIB
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2016
Global Perspective

This course is the continuation of Intermediate Modern Arabic IIA. Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to Arabic society. More emphasis will be given to speaking,structures and writing. Students will be guided to write more at the paragraph level. A language table will take place twice a week to help learners improve their communication skills.

Intermediate Spanish I
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018
Global Perspective

Strives for mastery of complex grammatical structures and continues work on writing and reading skills. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. This course meets three times a week plus an additional 50 minutes for conversation. It also requires workbook online. Prerequisite: At least two consecutive semesters of college Spanish

  • Elementary Spanish
  • Prior exposure to Spanish

Intermediate Spanish I
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Global Perspective

Strives for mastery of complex grammatical structures and continues work on writing and reading skills. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. This course meets three times a week plus an additional 50 minutes for conversation. It also requires workbook online. Prerequisite: At least two consecutive semesters of college Spanish

  • A year of college level Spanish or equivalent

Introduction to Portuguese as a World Language
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

This course offers introductory exposure to the beautiful language that is Portuguese. In this course the students will learn essential conversational skills used in everyday situations (restaurants, stores, offices, etc.). Additionally, we will read a small selection of short poems from different writers as a preview of what the portuguese cultural landscape has to offer. 

Note: Portuguese is the language of Portugal and Brazil as well as of the autonomous regions of the Azores (Açores in Portuguese spelling) and Madeira. Additionally, it is the official language of Mozambique (Moçambique), Angola, Guinea-Bissau (Guiné-Bissau), São Tomé e Príncipe, the Cape Verde Islands (Cabo Verde), and East Timor. It is also still spoken in Macau and Goa. Over four million Portuguese who have emigrated to various countries retain their first language. Galician, spoken in northwestern Spain, is very similar to Portuguese. 

Language & Power
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

As the children's saying goes, "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words can never hurt me." But is that really so? What is the relationship of words to world in a culture where actions are supposed to "speak louder than words?" Language is more than just a means of communicating information. As one of our most characteristic forms of behavior, it constitutes us as individuals and shapes our social reality to an extent that most of us typically remain unaware of. People do things with words and words do things to people. How is it that language can have such power? And how might we obtain a degree of the power of language for ourselves? This course explores the workings of language as social symbolic power in everyday life from a cross-disciplinary perspective, drawing on work in philosophy, history, linguistics, sociology, anthropology, and social and cultural theory. Topics will include the origins and nature of language; the relation between language, knowledge, and ideology; language as symbolic capital; language and identity; institutional discourse and linguistic imperialism; and the possibilities of resignification. Prerequisite: None

Linguistic Theory: Syntax
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the major issues in syntactic theory, including phrase structure, the lexicon, case theory, binding theory, movement, and locality conditions. The course is intended to prepare students with fundamentals for further study in theoretical linguistics, emphasizing scientific reasoning skills. Prerequisite: None

Practical Chinese I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016

This is a Chinese language course for beginners. It aims to help you develop communicative competence in Chinese, focusing on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. You will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

Practical Chinese II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2016

This is the second semester of Chinese language course for beginners. It aims to help you develop communicative competence in Chinese, focusing on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. You will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. You will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course. New Practical Chinese Reader 1/新实用汉语课本 1, Textbook & Workbook, by Xun Liu/刘�. Publisher: Beijing Language and Culture University Press.

  • Practical Chinese I or permission of instructor

Practical Chinese III
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2014

This course is the continuation of first-year Chinese. Students will continue to learn more skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that you can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will still be given to both characters and structures, you will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language. Prerequisite: First-year Chinese or permission of the instructor

Semantics
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2011

Semantics is the study of the literal meaning of words and the meaning of the way words are combined. This course is a practical introduction to topics in formal semantics. It aims to provide a good understanding of a range of semantic phenomena and issues in semantics, using a truth-conditional account of meaning. The topics include modality and possible worlds, counterfactuals, generalized quantifiers, aktionsarten and event semantics, opacity and specificity, tense and aspect. Prerequisite: None

Survey of Latin American Literature II
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2010

(Writing and speaking intensive) An introduction to Latin American texts from Modernismo, first Latin American movement at the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Course will begin with José Martí's célèbre essay "Nuestra América" and end with Subcomandante Marcos' novel Muertos incómodos. Different cultural movements and their sociopolitical contexts are examined through representative works. Class discussions and assigned papers are based on literary analysis and research. Prerequisite: Three semesters of college Spanish plus a writing course

Syntactic Theory
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the major issues in syntactic theory, including phrase structure, the lexicon, case theory, binding, movement, locality conditions, and logical form. It aims to strengthen students' foundational knowledge of linguistic theory and prepares them for more advanced study. Prerequisite: Grammar of Science or permission of the instructor

Taller de plan / Plan workshop
(2.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2012

Following Stanley Fish's provocative question: "Is there a text inthis class, or, are there only interpretative communities? This talleris offered to students working on plans in Spanish and relateddisciplines as a forum to discuss their ideas, their interpretations,their reading and writing. We will read a variety of selected articleson pos-tcolonial and feminist literary theory to start the discussion.

TOPICS IN SPANISH-AMERICAN CULTURE & HISTORY
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2010

Latin America is a vast region diverse in geography and culture tied together by a shared historical experience and a language. The Spanish-speaking countries are as rich and varied in their culture and historical development as they are in their geography and in the mix of peoples that inhabit them. In this course we will examine some of the most important issues in Latin America from a cultural and historical perspective: from nation building in the nineteenth century, to revolution and dictatorship, to indigenista and testimonial narratives. We will read essays, novels, and also watch films and discuss works of art. Prerequisite: Courses in Latin American literature

Word Grammar: Introduction to Morphology
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

Morphology is the study of how words are formed. This course introduces the terms and concepts necessary for analyzing words. Topics such as the mental lexicon, derivation, compounding, inflection, morphological typology, productivity, and the interface of morphology with syntax and phonology expose students to the whole of the field. Prerequisite: None

For Languages offerings, also see:

Greek IIA
Introduction to Literary Genres: Spain, Latin America, Equatorial Guinea
Latin IIA
TESOL Certificate I

Liberal Studies

Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism and others. This course can compliment any year of course work. Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses; it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

  • None

Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2019
Global Perspective

A course for those interested in creating and interpreting maps.  The course will cover the history of map making, how people currently portray spacial information, and some of the mathematical choices involved in map design. We will work with primitive tools such as pencil and paper as well as GIS platforms for mapping and statistical information. Students will create a variety of actual maps over the course of the semester.

For Liberal Studies offerings, also see:

Intermediate Spanish I
Intermediate Spanish II
Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE
WHIP - Exploring the Health and Wellness of College Students

Literature

" . . . outliving a time by telling its story": Conflict and Memory in the Contemporary British Novel
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2018

"'The proper stuff of fiction' does not exist," wrote Virginia Woolf in 1925, "everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss." The novelists we will be reading in this course - a rather open-ended exploration of the contemporary British novel from the 1980s to the present - would agree with Woolf. In exploring a range of richly diverse and original novels, we will consider the writers' attempts to respond to the major social, economic and political events that shaped their lives: the end of empire; immigration from the former colonies; radical changes in racial and sexual politics; and the increasingly postmodern and postcolonial experience of British culture. Authors may include: Doris Lessing, Julian Barnes, Caryl Phillips, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Pat Barker, Graham Swift, Jeanette Winterson, Angela Carter, A.S. Byatt, Zadie Smith. Prerequisite: One previous literature course or permission of instructor.

"FOR ONCE, THEN, SOMETHING": AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM TWAIN TO ELLISON
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2014

This course will pick up roughly where Apocalyptic Hope left off last semester: out of the American Renaissance, into the Gilded Age, the Modernist period, and through the two world wars. Beginning with Mark Twain's, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, we will go on to consider the works of novelists, poets and playwrights as various as Kate Chopin, Sherwood Anderson, Willa Cather, Robert Frost, Eugene O'Neill, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, Ralph Ellison, and Adrienne Rich. In exploring a range of 2oth century literature--richly diverse and original, radically expeimental--we will consider the writers' attempts to resond to major social, economic and political events that shaped their lives. NOTE: This course covers the same material as John Sheehy's "What Will Suffice."  Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement

"The Soul Has Bandaged Moments": The Gothic Imagination: Walpole to Morrison
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2015

Delving into the darkest recesses of the human soul, the gothic novel of the late 18th century was a new sort of narrative that had at its center the potent intersection of sex, violence, and the law. Beginning with Horace Walpole (The Castle of Otranto, 1764) and the first writers in the "School of Terror" (Ann Radcliffe and Matthew Lewis), we will consider how these authors used Gothic excesses - all types of villainous acts (forced marriages, imprisonment, the desecration of corpses) committed by all sorts of villainous characters (incestuous parents, monks in league with the devil, insane scientists) - to explore the worlds of sexual and social transgressions. We will then move to the19th century transformations of the genre (Shelley, Keats, Coleridge, Stevenson, Stoker), and close with the legacy of the Gothic in the 20th and 21st century (Faulkner, Borges, Allende, Marquez, Morrison). Whether set in a castle, a city, or a sleepy village house, gothic literature pushes at the boundaries of what is known and what can be known, asking whether we can separate pain from pleasure, reason from unreason, mind from spirit, self from other, justice from corruption and punishment from tyranny. Prerequisite: Must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement 

19th Century Novel
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

Selections from three nineteenth century authors: Dickens, Balzac, and Dostoevsky.

20th Century Novel
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014

Great novels of the 20th century: Woolf, Thomas Mann, Faulkner, Camus, Bulgakov, Babel, Calvino, Segald and Toni Morrison.

Apocalyptic Hope: the Literature of the American Renaissance
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2017

This course will center on the "American Renaissance"--that period between, roughly, 1830 and 1870 that witnessed the burst of intense intellectual and artistic energy that produced some of the most memorable and enduring American literature. We will examine as much of that literature as we can, in a range of genres: slave narratives from Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, essays from Emerson and Thoreau, novels from Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and others, poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Our goal in examining these works will always be double: on the simplest level, we will be interested in how these writers interpreted and responded to the places and times in which they lived; on a deeper level, though, we will consider how each of these works--and all of them together--attempts to create something we might call now an "American consciousness," attempts to invent, or re-invent, America. The point of the course is to read as much as we can, more than anything else--to develop a firm understanding of both canonical and non-canonical 19th century American literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but the way we think about ourselves as Americans. This will NOT be a writing seminar: it will involve far too much reading for that. Students, though, will be expected to write about what they read on a regular basis, to lead discussions on a rotating basis, and to write a seminar paper at the end. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, and must have passed the writing requirement.  Otherwise, a love for the written word and at least a liking for American literature.

BUDDHISM & POETRY
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

An exploration of the presence of Buddhist ideas and practices in poetry, including some reflection on concepts of the mind, nature, contemplation, language, and the self. Readings of selected Chinese and Japanese poetry in translation and poetry in English including work by Kenneth Rexroth, Gary Snyder, Lew Welch, W.S. Merwin, Robert Hass, and Mark Strand. Prerequisite: None

Dostoevsky and Tolstoy
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

For the first six weeks, a reading of Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov and shorter works by the author. For the last six weeks, a reading of Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Anna Karenina.Prerequisite: None

Dreams, Dickens and Dostoevsky
( Variable Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

A seminar on dreams as a structuring device in Dickens and Dotoevsky. Students will read Freud's Interpretation of Dreams and Dickens' Little Dorrit and Bleak House in the first six weeks; we will then turn to Crime and Punishment and Brothers Karamazov in the second six weeks.

This course can be taken for 2-4 credits.

Embodied Poetry
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

An experiment in the relation of poetry to performance, as something other than text. We will recite and perform poems, critiquing performance. Emphasis will be on oral presentation, but we will also consider poems set to music, graphic presentations of poems, et cetera. Prerequisite: None

First Contact: Voices of America's Frontiers
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2015
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

We’ll explore written descriptions of North American first encounters in this intermediate level literature course, including texts such as the Vinland Sagas and Cabeza de Vaca’s narrative in addition to British colonial writers such as Mary Rowlandson and William Wood. Other sources in translation may be French, Russian, or even Chinese as we work to dislocate—or perhaps relocate—the concept of American exceptionalism and common origins alongside the shared landscape. Concurrently, we’ll study early Native American writers such as Sarah Winnemucca as well as various oral traditions. While the course will be based in literary methods, the primary texts and issues explored may also be of interest for students of history, anthropology, Native American studies, American Studies, and more. 

Gender Trouble: Women writers of the Americas, a comparative approach
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2017
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

Ever since feminists called attention to women's lives, the question of what it means to be a woman has been the subject of much academic debate. However, despite improvement in women's lives and shared similarities, the experience of being a woman differs markedly. Issues such as gender,race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and sexual orientation seem to account for these differences. We will examine issues of gender, race, identity, nationality, and sexual orientation in the work of selected writers of the Americas. We will also consider the ways in which gender, race, and historical and cultural specificity shape and complicate these categories of inquiry.  Prerequisite: Prior exposure to Latin America. The course is offered in English but students may write in English, Spanish or Portuguese. 

Additional Fee:$ 0

  • Prior exposure to Latin America is desirable

Generators: The Literature of Energy
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013
Global Perspective

If you believe energy can be described solely in work units of BTUs, MPGs, and kWhs, think again, as the human generation of expression has long mirrored our use of energy. We will examine the cultural and historical roots of human conceptions of energy, quickly reading our way to the present day while taking both local and global views of this inescapable and essential topic. Poetry and nonfiction will be regularly read, although a special focus on world petrofiction is planned. Authors may include William Blake, Mary Shelley, Reza Negarestani, Abdul Rahman Munif, Ishimure Michiko, Pattiann Rogers, Christa Wolf, Alfred Crosby, David Gessner, and Helon Habila. Finally, we will watch a small number of films such as There Will Be Blood, Avatar, Gasland, and Matewan.

Prerequisite: None. Note, however, that Professor Sara Salimbeni will teach a companion course on energy from a natural science perspective in the spring. Generators is likewise not a prerequisite for that course; however, these courses taken in sequence offer a deep interdisciplinary grounding in issues of energy. 

INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE I: THE CONQUEST OF AMERICA, THE QUESTION OF THE OTHER
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2011

The main goal of this survey course is to introduce students to the cultures & literatures of the Nahua, Maya and Inca peoples on the territory that after the conquest came to be known as Spanish America; we will then move on to examine accounts of the discovery, conquest and colonization; we will conclude the course with the writings produced in the age of Spanish American emancipation. In class, we will read letters, cronicas, stories, poems, novels and essays that in one way or another helped define an entire continent. It is hoped that through these readings the students learn to place the text within its literary, historical and cultural context, we will also learn to identify the common themes, the voices, and the complex historical conditions under which these texts emerge. Given the scope of the course and the period studied, attendance and punctual and careful reading of the assigned material is of utmost importance. Frequent absences or late coming to class will reflect negatively on the grade. Prerequsite: Upper language or literature courses in Spanish

Introduction to Literary Genres: Spain, Latin America, Equatorial Guinea
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2011

Designed as an introduction to drama, poetry and prose fiction this course familiarizes students with literary analysis and further develops their oral and written skills. The course explores the formal elements of drama, poetry, prose fiction and essay through readings from Spain, Spanish America & Equatorial Guinea. Special emphasis is placed on writing critically and persuasively. Ideally, students will develop a greater understanding of Spanish by learning to read closely, argue clearly, and speak confidently about literature. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: 3/4 semesters of college Spanish or equivalent

Introduction to Literature: The Epic
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

A reading of three epics from the ancient world: Homer's The Illiad and The Odyssey, and Virgil's The Aeneid.  

Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019
Global Perspective

After centuries of invisibility and marginalization, Latino culture and literature exploded on the American scene in the 60s. Chicanos, Cubans, Nuyoricans, and lately Dominicans and Central Americans have all contributed to create a diversified body of literature characterized by its bilingualism, biculturalism, and hybridity. This course will center on how U.S. Latino / a literature bears witness to identity formation, self-representation, and celebration of Latino culture and its people. It will explore a series of critical issues that define "latinidad" in the U.S. including language (bilingualism, Spanglish, code-switching, and "dialect"), race/ethnnicity/color, gender migration, racism, and difference. The texts in the course are representative of a great body of oral and written literature that articulates the experience of being Latina / o in the U.S. Although the course is taught in English, familiarity with Spanish is useful. This course requires the careful reading of the assigned materials, therefore, class participation, attendance and preparation is of utmost importance, continued absences and lack of preparation will reflect negatively on the grade. Prerequisite: None

Literature & History of the First World War
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2014
Designated Writing

D.H. Lawrence describes the time period of the First World War as a "tragic age." In this course we will look at that event, making an attempt to analyze some aspects of the social context which allowed it to occur. We will consider the effects of that war on language, on social thought, on institutions. Texts will include D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, Eckstein's The Rites of Spring, Fussel's The Great War in Modern Memory, selections from poets with a focus on Wilfred Owen and Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Mrs. Dalloway. Prerequisite: None

Modern American Poetry
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2016
Designated Writing

A course dedicated to close reading of the major American figures of the Modernist period: William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, Marianne Moore, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, and Gertrude Stein. There are three papers, making this suitable as a Designated Writing Course.

Novels from the Balkans
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2011
Designated Writing

Blanchot, in The Writing of the Disaster, claims: "It is dark disaster that brings the light."  Through selected works, we will examine the "dark disaster" of the Balkans: the anguish of war, of ethic tension, of exile, and the suffering of the Holocaust and "the machinations of greater power that vie to absorb." Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

On the Shoulders of Giants: Mid-20th Century American Poetry
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013
Designated Writing

A close reading and discussion of poets after the formidable generation of Frost, Eliot, Moore, et al. Poets whose work we will read include Robert Lowell, Randall Jarrell, John Berryman, Elizabeth Bishop, Allen Ginsberg, and Sylvia Plath. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Plan Seminar in Literature I
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2010

A course for juniors and seniors on Plan. We will critique the writing of Plans in progress, read selections of articles on the authors, and read relevant essays on literary theory. May be taken for variable credits (1 to 4). Permission of professor.

Proust: Memory, Signs, & Meaning
(2.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2011

A year long course examining signs, memory, and meaning in three novels of Marcel Proust.  Fall semester: Swann's Way, Within a Budding Grove, and The Guermantes Way.  Spring Semester: Cities of the Plain, The Captive, The Fugitive, and Time Regained.

Ricouer
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

A plan seminar which will examine Paul Ricouer's work on narrative.

Seminar in Literary Studies
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013
Designated Writing

Topic: Journeys

“I tramp a perpetual journey.”  Walt Whitman, Song of Myself

Some journeys, like Homer’s Odysseus’s, end in a return home; others, like Joseph Conrad’s Kurtz’s, end with words that cannot be repeated; and still others, as Emily Dickinson suggests, can occur without stepping outdoors: “to shut our eyes is to travel.” Journeys through interior corridors and journeys through external landscapes will be our focus in this introductory literature course.  Through close reading of fiction, poetry, drama, and essays, we will think about the relationship between moving inward and moving outward, between home and exile, between identity and place.  We will enter into fictional minds and countries, reading with empathy and with openness – and acquiring a critical vocabulary to describe what we’re seeing and hearing.  This class will be writing-intensive; we will read one another’s essays offering encouragement and feedback as drafts evolve into final essays. 

Authors may include: Chaucer, William Godwin, Joseph Conrad, Michael Ondaatje, Virginia Woolf, Antonio Machada, Nadine Gordimer, Emily Dickinson, Jose Saramago, Toni Morrison, August Wilson, W.G. Sebald, Aleksandar Hemon, Elizabeth Bishop, Adrienne Rich.

Prerequisite: None beyond a willingness to engage in the journey of imaginative reading.

 “Reading is going toward something that is about to be, and no one yet knows what it will be.” Italo Calvino, If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler

Shakespeare's Tragedies
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2010
Designated Writing

Selected readings from the tragedies of Shakespeare, with an emphasis on King Lear, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Coriolanus. An exploration of the themes of language, kingship and ethical choice. Prerequisite: None

Shakespeare: Selected Comedies, Histories, Tragedies and Problem Plays
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2014
Designated Writing

Our reading will include Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Othello, Coriolanus, and Anthony and Cleopatra. We will focus on the themes of genre definitions, gender issues, freedom and authority. Consideration will also be given to scenic structure, use of metaphor, characterization and setting.

Shakespeare: The History Plays and the Romances
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

A reading of Shakespeare's history plays with an emphasis on authority, kingship, metaphor, and structure; the second half of the semester will focus on the romances, with an emphasis on Shakespeare's use of fairy tale elements and the above issues of authority, kingship, metaphor, and structure.

Tell about the South: the South in the American Literary Imagination
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2016

In this course we will examine 20th Century Southern literature--that produced by Southerners, and literature about the South written by others. We will consider a range of works by William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison and others. 

Telling and Retelling: Contemporary Responses to Familiar Fictions
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2019

Through close reading of paired texts, we will explore the dialogues that contemporary authors create with the past – dialogues that transgress the boundaries of time and support Virginia Woolf's suggestion that "books continue each other, in spite of our habit of judging them separately" (A Room of One's Own). Important to our discussion will be the nature of the fictional re-workings: a change in narrative perspective; a de-centering of familiar themes and motifs; an exploration of the boundaries generated by gender, race, and class; a blurring of the line between fact and fiction. We will be making connections among the works that move us both forward and backward, juxtaposing familiar and unfamiliar texts in ways that will stimulate readings of both. Pairings may include: William Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day; Shakespeare’s King Lear and Jane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and J.M. Coetzee’s Foe; Samuel Coleridge’s “Christabel” and A.S. Byatt’s Possession; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Peter Ackroyd’s The Case of Victor Frankenstein; Robert Louis Stevenson Jekyll and Hyde and Valerie Martin’s Mary Reilly; Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea; E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End and Zadie Smith’s On Beauty.  Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement

THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHILD
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2011

"Genius is but childhood recovered at will." Charles BaudelaireIn this course, we will be reading novels (American, British, Nigerian, Indian, Caribbean, Australian, Irish) told from the perspective of a child or a young adult. Many of these novels are haunting in their exploration of a child's mysterious, beautiful, and often painful journey into adulthood, Central to our discussion will be an examination of how each child narrator/protagonist creates a self/constructs an identity often against enormous personal, societal, and cultural obstacles. We will consider how particular cultural moments and pivotal historical events shape these children, and are, in turn, shaped for us, the readers, through the lens of their young eyes. Authors may include: James Joyce, Chris Abeni, Seamus Deane, Jonathan Safron Foer, Dave Eggers, Marjane Satrapi, Danzy Senna, Colm Toibin, Ben Okri, Allison Bechdel. Prerequisite: Coursework in literature

U.S. LATINO/A LITERATURE: CARTOGRAPHIES OF THE SELF, BORDERS, EXILES
(6.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

After centuries of invisibility and marginalization, Latino culture and literature exploded on the American scene in the 60s. Chicanos, Cubans, Nuyoricans, and lately Dominicans and Central Americans have all contributed to create a diversified body of literature characterized by its bilingualism, biculturalism, and hybridity. This course will center on how U.S. Latino / a literature bears witness to identity formation, self-representation, and celebration of Latino culture and its people. It will explore a series of critical issues that define "latinidad" in the U.S. including language (bilingualism, Spanglish, code-switching, and "dialect"), race/ethnnicity/color, gender migration, racism, and difference. The texts in the course are representative of a great body of oral and written literature that articulates the experience of being Latina / o in the U.S. Although the course is taught in English, familiarity with Spanish is useful. This course requires the careful reading of the assigned materials, therefore, class participation, attendance and preparation is of utmost importance, continued absences and lack of preparation will reflect negatively in the grade. Prerequisite: None

VOICES FROM THE SOUTH
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2010

Selected works from Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers and Eudora Welty.

WHAT WILL SUFFICE: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2018
Designated Writing

This course picks up roughly where Apocalyptic Hope leaves off: out of the American Renaissance, into the Gilded Age, the Modernist period, and through the two world wars, tracing the development of the "American" as it faces, often reluctantly and anyway never without a fight, the inevitability of the modern. We will begin with Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - a book Hemingway once famously called the beginning of all American literature; from there we'll go on to consider the works of writers and poets as various as Theodore Dreiser, Stephen Crane, T.S. Eliot, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Sherwood Anderson, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, Ralph Ellison, and others. The point of this course, like that of its sister course, Apocalyptic Hope, is to read as much as we can; to develop as broad an understanding as possible of both canonical and non-canonical twentieth-century literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but who we are in the twenty-first century. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; Apocalyptic Hope is not a prerequisite, but students who have taken it will have preference.  See course syllabus.

  • Permission of instructor

For Literature offerings, also see:

Intermediate Spanish II
Plan Writing Seminar
Reading RLP: The Ancient World
Seminar in Religion, Literature & Philosophy I
Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II
Survey of Latin American Literature II
The Literature of Northern New England
Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs
Writing Seminar: Exploring the (New) New Journalism

Mathematics

A Whirlwind Tour of Mathematics
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

Do you want a thorough understanding of the most important and deep theorems in every branch of mathematics? Do you want to achieve this in a three credit course from a standing start? Good luck with that - you won't manage it in this course. Instead, we'll look at six to ten topics, chosen for their accessibility and beauty, and drawn from a broad range of subdisciplines of math. Possibilities include: irrational and imaginary numbers, the infinite, chaos and fractals, Fermat's Last Theorem, the Platonic solids, the fourth dimension, the combinatorial explosion, P vs. NP, the Four Color Theorem, non-Euclidean geometry, logical paradoxes, and many others. No prior mathematical experience is expected. Prerequisite: None

Algebraic Structures
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2016

An introduction to the theory of groups, rings and fields. Advanced topics covered will depend on the interests of the participants and might include Sylow theory, combinatorial or number theoretic connections, error-correcting codes, modules or Galois theory.

ASPECTS OF GEOMETRY
( Variable Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

Throughout the history of geometry, great advances have been made through radical reconceptualizations of the entire subject: Euclid's axiomatic geometry; the analytic geometry of Descartes, et. al.; the projective geometry stemming from Renaissance art; the unification of geometry and number through complex numbers, quaternions and linear algebra; the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries by Gauss, Lobachevsky and Bolyai; the group theoretical synthesis of geometry of Felix Klein's 1872 Erlanger Programm. We will focus on conceptual aspects of these points of view and see how each shift addressed fundamental issues left unresolved by existing theories. Prerequisite: None

Calculus
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science.

Calculus II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2019

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus (NSC515). Topics include techniques and applications of integration, complex numbers, power series, parametric equations and differential equations.

  • Calculus or permission of instructor

Calculus III
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2016

Calculus III continues the development of the techniques of Calculus into multi-variable and vector-valued functions.

Combinatorics Study Group
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014

Combinatorics is a broad subfield of math concerned with discrete, often finite, structures.  It is unusual in that it is possible to engage seriously with difficult questions in the field without an extensive list of prerequisites.  That's exactly what we'll do here.  Likely objects of study include graphs, Latin squares (sudoku puzzles being a well-known example of these) and combinatorial designs, enumeration problems and integer sequences.  The goal of the course is not to give an account of the main tools or topics of combinatorics, although we'll do some of this in passing, but to get a taste for some of the many aspects involved in the creation of mathematics, including imagination, frustration, collaboration, bewilderment, hard work, insight, luck and maybe even joy.  May be repeated for credit.  Prerequisite: Previous math courses, ideally including Discrete Math or something similar. Programming experience is useful but not required.

COMPLEX VARIABLES
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2010

Prerequisite: Calculus II

Differential Equations
(3.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2015

Differential equations is the mathematics of changing systems. It has wide-ranging applications, including biology, physics, and economics. This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations, with an emphasis on finding and applying techniques to solve first-order and linear higher-order differential equations. Prerequisite: Calculus II

Discrete Mathematics
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

Discrete math is the study of mathematical objects on which there is no natural notion of continuity. Examples include the integers, networks, permutations and search trees. After an introduction to the tools needed to study the subject, the emphasis will be on you *doing* mathematics. Series of problems will lead gradually to proofs of major theorems in various areas of the discipline. This course is recommended for those intending to do advanced work in math or computer science. Prerequisite: None

Dynamical Systems and Chaos Theory
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

Our goal for this class will be to study dynamical systems.  To study dynamical systems, we will be using the software Mathematica (no initial computer programming knowledge is required).  We will not only learn some of the theory behind dynamical systems, but we will also experiment on the computer. We will look at simple dynamical systems, use graphical analysis to help describe the behavior of a system, symbolic dynamics, examine fractals and look at the Mandelbrot set and Julia sets.  Prerequisite: Linear Algebra or instructor's approval.

Fun with Logic
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2012

This course is meant to be an introduction to logical systems, their use and applications to all fields of science and humanities.  It will be accessible to all levels of students from all fields.

We will be studying several logical systems, such as propositional and classical logic, intuitionistic logic and modal logic.  

 

Prerequisite: None

Group Theory and Rubik's Cube
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

This course will explain the basics of a branch of mathematics called Group Theory by examining Rubik's Cube and other similar puzzles. My hope is that the puzzles will motivate the ideas behind Group Theory. Although this is an introductory course and does not depend on any previous math (we will, for example, hardly use numbers at all), students should be comfortable with abstract thought. Prerequisite: Some facility with abstract concepts

Group Tutorial: Real Analysis
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

Real Analysis is the study of the real number system.  In this tutorial we look at how the real numbers are built and put the results developed in the Calculus sequence on a more rigorous footing.  As this is a tutorial, responsibility will fall mostly on the students to choose the precise topics and navigate a route through the material. Prerequisite: Calculus 2 and permission of instructor

Linear Algebra
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

Next to Calculus, this is the most important math course offered. It is important for its remarkable demonstration of abstraction and idealization on the one hand, and for its applications to many branches of math and science on the other. This course will cover linear algebra in n-dimensional space.  Matrices, vector spaces and transformations are studied extensively.

  • Calculus or permission of instructor

Map Coloring, Graph Theory and the Four Color Theorem
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

Every map, no matter how the countries are laid out, can be colored using just four colors in such a way each pair of adjacent countries are different colors (there are some minor, natural restrictions).  This is the celebrated Four Color Theorem.  Conjectured to be true in the 1850s and subject to many failed attempts at proof, it was controversially settled in 1976. The controversy comes from the fact that the proof relies on a computer calculation; no human has (or could) check all of the details.  This result lies within the field of Graph Theory, one of the most vibrant subfields of math of the last 100 years (and still so today).   This course will take us through the methods used in the proof of the Four Color Theorem by way of many discursions into Graph Theory.  Topics to be covered include chromatic polynomials, hamiltonicity, planarity, graph decompositions and classifying polyhedra.  We'll also investigate related problems: What if each country has a lunar colony that must be colored with the same color as that country?  How many colors would we need if we lived on a torus?

Prerequisite: Discrete Math or permission of instructor

Multivariable Calculus
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

An extension of the ideas from Calculus and Calculus 2 to multivariable and vector functions. Topics covered include the geometry of 3-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals and higher dimensional analogues of the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: Calculus II or equivalent

Number Theory
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

An introduction to number theory, from its inconspicuous beginnings on a Babylonian clay tablet almost four thousand years ago to its mature majesty in the 19th century as "the Queen of Mathematics" (in the words of Gauss), and beyond. Topics include the infinitude of primes, modulo arithmetic, the RSA cryptosystem, Pell's equation, Fermat's Last Theorem, and much more. Prerequisite: None

Probability
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

Probabilities pop up everyday like "There's a 30% chance of rain" or "The probability of being dealt a full house in stud poker is approximately 0.00144." Our main goal for the class will be developing various tools to calculate probabilities.  Topics include axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables, special discrete and continuous distributions and joint distributions.  Prerequisite: Calculus I

PUZZLED?
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2011

This course will give students a chance to test and develop their puzzle-solving ingenuity. We'll attack a series of puzzles, going from Lewis Carroll's logic problems via the classic "recreational math" puzzles of Lucas, Loyd and Dudeney to modern crazes such as the sudoku. Pass/Fail grading. Prerequisite: None

Set Theory & Logic
(3.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2014

After a review of various notions from logic and set theory that will be mostly familiar from previous courses, we study a variety of topics that form the foundation of mathematics. The exact list of topics depends on the interests of the class, but some natural candidates are: cardinals and ordinals, propositional and first-order logic, axiomatic set theory, models, constructions of number systems, and categories. Students may take this course for three or four credits. Those students taking the class for four credits will undertake an extensive investigation into an additional topic. 

Prerequisite: Several math courses, preferably including either Real Analysis (NSC626) or Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation (NSC543)

Statistics
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2018

Statistics is the science--and art--of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics as commonly used in the natural and social sciences. Topics include: probability theory, data collection, description, visualization, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression and analysis of variance. We will use the open source statistical computing package R (no prior computing experience is assumed).

Statistics Workshop
( Variable Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019

A follow-up to Statistics (NSC123) in which students acquire and hone the statistical skills needed for their work on Plan or simply pursue more advanced topics within the field. Course content is driven by the interests and requirements of those taking the class. Variable credit (1-4). May be repeated for credit.

  • Statistics (NSC123) or permission of the instructor

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2017

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into 10 units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam or who just want to learn some math. Over the semester, 3-4 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace. Prerequisite: None

Writing Math
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2018

We will study the writing and presentation of mathematics. All skills needed for writing Plan-level math will be discussed, from the overall structure of a math paper down to the use of the typesetting package LaTeX. Much of the time will be spent working on writing proofs. Short papers, based on material in your other math classes, will be read and discussed as a group. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Passed Clear Writing Requirement; concurrent course or tutorial that includes substantial mathematical content

For Mathematics offerings, also see:

Algorithms
Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation
How Environmentally Sustainable is Marlboro College?
Information Theory
Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice

Music

Chamber Music
(1.00 Credit — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string and brass instruments welcome. Course may be repeated for credit.

Additional Fee:$ 0

Composers' Workshop
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

The course is designed for instrumentalists and vocalists to compose and perform music written for the group. Each week, participants will bring original compositions in various stages of progress to study and perform, while exploring concepts in music theory and composition emerging from the works. The course will culminate in a public performance of the compositions.

Generally speaking, we will divide our time between exploring the compositions in a classroom setting, and rehearsing them at the recital hall.

The class is designed for more experienced students who are able to read music and have a firm command of their instrument/s. If in doubt, see the instructor to determine fit.

Composition to Improvisation (And Vice Versa)
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

Charting the connection, commonalities and differences between improvisation and composition. We will practice concepts central to both and examine how they informeach other. This course will constitute critical enquiry and practice in equal measure, alternating sessions between the classroom and the rehearsal space, looking at concepts critically and then applying them practically. 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Counterpoint I (Sixteenth Century)
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2010

Study of counterpoint in the style of Palestrina. Two-part and three-part writing. Imitation, canon and free counterpoint will be covered. Prerequisite: Theory Fundamentals; sight-singing ability or permission of instructor

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY COUNTERPOINT
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

Study of contrapuntal techniques of the 18th century. Two-part invention, chorale elaborations and fugue in the style of Bach will be covered. Prerequisite: 16th Centrry Counterpoint or permission of instructor

Electronic Music: Concepts and Practice
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2018

The course will provide an introduction to concepts, techniques, history and ideological frameworks informing electronic music. Designed as equal parts hands-on practice and academic enquiry, the course will alternate between readings and listening to works done in various periods and genres of electronic music and making music using the basic techniques of sequencing, sampling, synthesis and recording. Coursework will constitute on-going etudes, a final project and paper and weekly readings and listening assignments. The course is designed primarily for students who have more than a casual interest with music or sound design as part of their on-going course of study at Marlboro.

  • Music Fundamentals I or permission of instructor

GUITAR ENSEMBLE
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2010

A guitar quartet, performing the works of various composers, culminating in a performance of said works.

Impressionism to 21st Century Music
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2014
Global Perspective

A study of works of Debussy, Ravel, Stravinksy, Schoenberg, Hindemith, Bartok and others.  The works will be put into a socio-historical perspective.  Students present a talk on a 20th century composition of their choice. Prerequisite: None 

Jazz Ensemble
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2018

 Jazz in weekly rehearsals with a performance at the end of semester. Prior requisite: Facility on a musical instrument or voice, reading music a big help! 

Jazz Workshop
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2018

researching, exploration and performance of jazz repertoire.

Jazz Workshop 2
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2013

A continuation of ensemble work from last semester, playing Jazz standards in weekly rehearsals. 

Prerequisite: Jazz Workshop 1 or permission of instructor

Jazz: History and Culture
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2017

The course will survey jazz music from a historical and cultural context. We will track the evolution, master practitioners, and cultural reception and arguments surrounding jazz throughout the previous century and into this one. The class will involve close listening to recording, readings of scholarly articles and other, less scholarly sources, 3 research projects, and editing / producing one 60 minute episode of a podcast as a research project.

Additional Fee:$ 0

Madrigal Choir
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2018

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit.Prerequisite: None; ability to read music helpful

Additional Fee:$0

Medieval & Renaissance Music
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016
Global Perspective

A study of the development of both sacred and secular forms and styles in music and its relation to social and cultural conditions of the time.

MUSIC COMPOSITION WORKSHOP
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2010

A course intended for musicians interested in exploring music composition. Students should have facility on an instrument (or voice) and have some sight reading ability. Short compositions will be written and performed every week. Musical structure, notation, etc. will be discussed in relation to the student's work. Prerequisite: Ability to read music, basic theory, ability to play an instrument

Music Fundamentals I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019

A study of musical practice and theory from basic notation to species counterpoint. Work concentrates on intense practice of singing, rhythm and music reading. 

Music Fundamentals II
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

This is the last of a course sequence designed as an intensive practical training for students interested in making music. The course will focus on improving our ability to hear, replicate, and document music. We will focus on sight singing, rhythmic skills, transcription, and utilizing these skills in our music making both in class and in our individual artistic practices outside the classroom. During the second part of the semester, we will also work on analysis and composition. The students will help guide the direction of the course by choosing particular musical examples and topics for transcription and analysis.

Music Improvisation in Theory and Practice
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2014
Global Perspective

We will engage in improvised music practices and the conceptual frameworks, techniques and musical vocabulary associated with them. As a general rule, we will divide our time between improvisation in workshop format and a seminar setting with readings on and by improvisers, intensive listening to recordings, and discussion of the topics - equal parts practical music making and academic enquiry. Proficiency with a musical instrument or in singing is required for the course. Prerequisite: Music Fundamentals 1 or permission of instructor

MUSIC IN THE ROMANTIC ERA
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2011

A study of the relationship between music and ideas in the 19th century. Emphasis on the transformation of the Sonata and the development of the symphony. Prerequisite: None

MUSIC: 1600-1800
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2017

A study of the development of musical forms during the period 1600-1800 and its importance in the society of this period. Ability to read music recommended. Prerequisite: None

Additional Fee:$ 0

Vocal Music Composition Workshop
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2017

This semester the workshop will emphasize compositions for small choir or vocal ensemble. Students will write compositions weekly which will be performed by fellow students in workshop. Prerequisite: Theory fundamentals, ability to read music

Western Music in the Last Century: Five Case Studies
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2019

The course will make an inquiry into the last century of western music from the vantage point of five works, written from 1913 to 2004: Igor Stravinski's Rite of Spring; George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess; Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gesange Der Jünglinge; Ornette Coleman's The Shape of Jazz To Come; and DJ Danger Mouse's The Grey Album. Each work will serve as a springboard for consideration of a wide range of notions that have gained special prominence in music of this time: modes of transmission and reception, developments in technology and their effect on  production and dissemination, cultural notions of "high brow" vs. "low brow", artisanship vs. industry, authenticity and fakeness, all inform these works in different and multifaceted ways. Course work will involve focused listening to those works and others related to them, reading of related materials drawn from both primary and secondary sources, and some on-going writing projects about music, as well as regular presentations of assigned topics as a starting point for discussion. Prerequisite: None

WORLDS OF MUSIC
(4.00 Credits — )

Spring 2014
Global Perspective

A study of music from non-western cultures and "folk" traditions of Europe and the United States using contemporary ethnomusicological concepts and procedures. Goal: To give the student an understanding of approaches to the study of music of western and non-western and/or traditional cultures through a series of case studies from a variety of regions and cultures. Ongoing journal of listening and observations (twice weekly), a final Project, and class presentation. This course entails a great deal of listening. Prerequisite: None

For Music offerings, also see:

Digital Multimedia

Painting

Painting I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2015

This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, and landscape. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or Studio Art or permission of instructor

Additional Fee: $50

Painting II
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2011

Studio class in advanced painting. Understanding contemporary  painting, its processes and philosophy. Four paintings will be  undertaken to investigate certain possibilities of painting. One  painting will involve working from a cell phone photo image, the  second painting will be painting as an accumulation of layers, the  third painting will be a series of three paintings developed through a  similar method, and the fourth painting will follow a specific  conceptual plan. Class time will be painting, critique, and discussion  of artists and ideas.

Prerequisite: Drawing 1, Painting 1, or permissionAdditional Fee:$100

Two Arms, Two Legs and a Head
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

This course will focus on the human figure, beginning with life drawing and moving into oil painting. To picture the body is difficult. This class will work primarily from direct observation of the model, building technical skills and conceptual approaches in figurative painting. Concurrent registration in ART 2265, Theory in Art Practice, is encouraged. Prerequisite: Drawing I or Painting I or permission of instructor

Philosophy

Antigone and Philosophy
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2013

The figure of Antigone has long been the focus of discussions of sexual difference, justice, ethics, competing obligations, law, and how the individual is related to the state.   Beginning with a reading of the Theban plays, Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone, we will trace the themes raised by Antigone’s burial of her brother and thereby her transgression of the law.  We will also be exploring the differences and similarities between how poets and philosophers articulate their views.  Much of the course will then be devoted to careful readings of Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Poetics and Politics.  In the final weeks of the class we will turn to interpretations of Antigone by more recent thinkers from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

BUDDHIST PHILOSOPHY
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

This course will be an exploration of Buddhist philosophical accounts of consciousness, language, knowledge and wisdom, the nature of reality, ethics, and the nature and purpose of human existence.  We will begin with a careful study of early Theravda texts.  Then we will devote considerable attention to Nagarjuna's (second century, India) Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, which is often thought to be the most important text in Buddhist philosophy.  We will then explore how later thinkers in India, Tibet, China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam engaged in diverse ways with each other and with the questions posed by Nagarjuna and his Theravada predecessors.  We will focus particular attention on Mipham's (nineteenth century, Tibet) Beacon of Certainty.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CONTEMPORARY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2012

This course will explore some of the most important texts in twentieth-century “continental” philosophy. While some of the authors we will read come from elsewhere—for example the Caribbean or South Asia—all of them are influenced by or engaged with, or are the most significant thinkers in the dominant movements of twentieth-century French and German philosophy, and the work of each of these thinkers has had an enormous impact across the humanities and social sciences.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Environmental Philosophy
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016

This course is an introduction to prominent questions and themes in environmental philosophy. We will begin with a study of moral and metaphysical approaches to philosophical questions of animals, nature and the place of human beings in the environment. Then we will consider a number of related issues in environmental philosophy, including questions of justice, environmental racism, gender, place, wilderness, nature climate change, practice and the role of philosophy in the context of environmental crisis.

Hegel: The Phenomenology of Spirit
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2017

This tutorial is devoted to a careful reading of Hegel's The Phenomenology of Spirit.

Heidegger's Being & Time
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2014

This course will begin with two weeks on Descartes, Kant, and Husserl to help understand some of the background of Heidegger’s work.  The rest of the semester will then be devoted to a close reading of Being and Time.  Being and Time is a notoriously challenging and often deeply rewarding text, and is widely regarded as the most important work in twentieth century European philosophy.  It is most famous for its phenomenological inquiries into questioning; interpretation; being-with-others; being-in-the-world; facing death; authentic and inauthentic existence; freedom; meaning; conscience; and care. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Mindfulness
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2013

This course is an introduction to the related themes of mindfulness, contemplation, and attention.  We will begin with a careful study of some early Buddhist texts on the cultivation of mindfulness, and then look at how attention and mindfulness have been employed in Buddhism and other religious traditions.  We will also investigate the ways in which mindfulness raises questions concerning emotion, wisdom, ethics, self-cultivation, happiness, and perception.  These questions will be explored from a variety of perspectives, including religious studies, philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, cognitive science, and consciousness studies.  One of our tasks in this course will be to evaluate the ways in which the various contemporary uses of the term “mindfulness” may or may not overlap with more traditional understandings of meditative practices. 

The course will include a meditation lab in addition to more traditional classroom studies.

Prerequisite:  Permission of the instructor.

Marx, Kierkegaard, & Nietzsche: 19th Century Responses to Hegel
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2010

In the waning years of the Enlightenment, European philosophers were primarily concerned with questions of reason and the subject: how reason can justify itself? is reason autonomous? is the subject autonomous? Kant's critical turn sought to understand the conditions of reason, thereby limiting its reach but also justifying it. Hegel attempted to extend and complete Kant's project, providing both a more historically informed account of the conditions of reason and the promise of transcending Kantian limits. In this course we will examine the nineteenth century philosophers who posed some of the most significant challenges to Hegel's project: Schopenhauer, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Our focus will be on the relation of the subject to history, ideology, reason, morality, religion, politics, economics, and culture, and how philosophical reflections on these issues were dramatically transformed in the context of modernity. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MODERN PHILOSOPHY
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010

Philosophers refer to the Early Modern period as the time between the late sixteenth and the early nineteenth centuries, when changes in European culture and scientific and political revolutions resulted in new modes of thought and practice that have come to characterize modernity. In this course we will primarily focus on the epistemological and metaphysical theories of some of the most prominent Early Modern philosophers, thinkers who sought to analyze and describe the new world that was emerging, but also contributed in significant ways to its shape. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Moral Philosophy
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

What is a “good” life?  What makes an action “good”?  What is the foundation for moral action and ethics?  Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality?  Through careful readings of classic philosophical texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and cultural context; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; and the relation between universality and singularity in moral life. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Phenomenology
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2015

Phenomenology constitutes one of the most significant developments in twentieth-century philosophy; it has deeply influenced philosophy in the West, and also informs concepts and methods across the humanities and social sciences. We will begin with an analysis of the methodologies and foundational concepts of Edmund Husserl's phenomenology, including the phenomenological reduction, the intentional structure of consciousness, the lifeworld, meaning, truth, knowledge, the proper relationship between philosophy and science, and the critique of representationalism. We will then move from Husserl's work to that of several of his successors who were inspired by it and developed their own approaches to phenomenology. In particular we will focus on phenomenological approaches to the body, art, race, hermeneutics, gender, technology, and relations with others. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2014

This course is an introduction to the most significant philosophical issues raised by the production and experience of art: the nature of art, aesthetic experience, aesthetic properties, taste, beauty, imagination, art and truth, aesthetic judgment, aesthetic interpretation, expression, representation, aesthetic objects, art and emotion, art and ethics, art and society, art and nature, art and economics, art and culture, etc. We will address these issues through careful readings of some of the most important texts in the history of Western philosophy of art as well as significant contemporary writings in philosophical aesthetics. The final part of the course will be specifically devoted to the nature and questions raised by contemporary art. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Philosophy of Poetry
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2014

The course will acquaint students with selected important texts on the philosophy of poetry, beginning with Socrates and eventually moving to the work of contemporary philosophers. Students will also examine poetry, including some of their own choosing, to consider how these philosophical ideas can enrich - or problematize - our feelings about poems and our interpretations of them. The course's materials will sometimes straddle the line between "philosophy" proper and literary criticism, providing an opportunity for students interested in both subjects to explore the boundaries between disciplines. (Student taught course by Adam Halwitz.) Note: This is not a poetry writing course. Prerequisite: None

Reading RLP: The Ancient World
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

A modified version of Marlboro's core humanities class, RLP, this class will focus on texts from the ancient world. Besides reading and discussing Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Sophocles, Euripides, Epictetus, and Lucretius we will consider what it means to read these Great Books in the United States at a time when justice and stability are in short supply.

Seminar in Religion, Literature & Philosophy I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

This is the first semester of a year-long seminar devoted to classic texts in the Western tradition. In particular, this course will raise questions about power, knowledge, and the human good through careful study of epics, tragedies, and philosophy. The Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy is recommended for students of any level intending to do Plan work in the humanities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

The Philosophy and Psychology of Happiness
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

This course is an introduction to theories of happiness and empirical research on human well-being.  Many ancient and modern philosophers have held happiness to be the highest good, and most people seem to want to be happy.  However, there are many different notions of what happiness is.  Does happiness consist in pleasure, in virtuous character, in contentment, in augmenting passionate desires, in satisfying desires, or in extirpating desires?  And how is happiness related to goodness and reason?  Can evil people be happy?  What about those who are thoroughly deluded?  And what does the relatively young field of positive psychology tell us about the nature of happiness and how to be happy?  Can this empirical research help us understood what actually makes us happy?  And if so, how ought this empirical research bear on philosophical questions of happiness, including how happiness relates to well-being, public policy, education, empathy, the satisfaction of desires, etc.? Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

For Philosophy offerings, also see:

African-American Political Thought
American Political Thought
ANGLO-AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION
Contemporary Political & Social Thought
Debating the Good
Plan Writing Seminar
Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II
Spinoza and Freedom
Thinking Politically
Wrestling with Ancestors: Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism

Photography

Crossing Photographic Genres
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2013

This course will explore the use of genre and camera formats within the photographic process. We will concentrate on the landscape, the documentary and the portrait; also, sub-genres such as the diaristic, the still life, the snapshot and the invented image will be explored. We will discuss and research how and why genre and camera format are essential to understanding the picture making process as a maker and as a viewer. Students will complete weekly photographic assignments and are expected to produce a final project of their own design. Prerequisite: Introduction to B/W Photography or permission of Instructor

Additional Fee: $100.

Imaging Water
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

Through exploring water and its important significance in life, as well as its materiality, we will discuss its possibilities and implications as subject matter. This intermediate photography course will survey various analog and digital photographic processes, as well as diverse approaches to visual image making. Historical photographs and readings will assist students in executing assignments from the more abstract to the environmentally concerned documentary in content.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography or permission of instructorsAdditional Fee: $100

Intermediate & Advanced Photography Plan Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2019

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced level students in the visual arts. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works in progress. Students at the intermediate level will be given three week long project prompts and technical demonstrations. Those on or about to be on Plan will select one body of work to focus on throughout the course. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely photographic or even photographic at all. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not at all photographic, but is intended to relate to their photographic work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of a body of work and Plan Exhibition. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography at the college level or by permission of instructor

Additional Fee:$120

  • Introduction to Photography

Introduction to Black & White Photography
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography and select digital photographic processes. The emphasis will be given to both visual communication, and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure, development and analog enlargement of the image, scanning and inkjet printing, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium.

Prerequisite: None (access to a camera capable of full manual operation, please note the school has some to loan)

Additional Fee: $100

Introduction to Photography
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016

This course provides an introductory foundation to black and white photography. Students will learn basic camera operation, film exposure, black and white film development and enlargement printing. Through the course of the semester students will complete photographic assignments, give an artist presentation and produce a final project of their own design. Student work will be discussed regularly in critique where visual communication will be emphasized alongside technique. Materials fee required. Having use of a camera with full manual operation capabilities is required, although the school has some to loan out.

Photography & The Body
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

In this course we will explore photography both as a means of representing the body, and as a way of extending or pushing the limits of the body's powers of perception. Topics include self portraiture, the body as form and shape, measuring the body, photographic typologies, time exposure, and multiple perspectives. We will also explore the transition from analog to digital photography, looking at evolutions in the physical practice of photography as well as changes in the images of the body that are produced. Through the course of the semester students will complete regular photographic assignments, give two presentations, and produce a final project of their own design. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography

*See Theory in Art Practice for optional 2 credit add- on.

The Narrative in Photography
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

This course will explore the use of narrative in photography, with and without inclusion of text. We will research and create narrative works in various forms from constructed fiction to the observed non-fictional and documentary. Prerequisite: Introduction to B/W Photography on the college level or by permission of instructor  Additional Fee: $100

 

Physics

Astrophysics
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2016

The intention of this tutorial is to build a solid understanding of the fundamental physics principles pertaining to light, observation, and properties of astronomical objects. This tutorial is intended to prepare students for research and plan writing in astrophysics. As a main resources we will be using Carroll, and Ostlie's An Introduction To Modern Astro- physics. we will be reading about a chapter a week and do a few problems from the chapter.

CIRCUITS AND OPTICS
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2011

A combination lab/theory course covering DC, AC, and digital circuits as well as geometrical and wave optics. Specific topics will depend on individual student interests. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Classical Mechanics
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2017

During this class we will analyze the mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. We will focus on topics like oscillations, some methods in the calculus of variations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics. We will introduce the mathematical formalism needed for the quantum theory of physics. 

  • General Physics I, Calculus I and II and III, or approval from the teacher

Electricity & Magnetism
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2017

An introduction to the physics of electric and magnetic phenomena. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric and magnetic fields, induction, Maxwell's equations, and some DC circuits.

  • General Physics I and Calculus I and Calculus II or permission of the instructor

Energy
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

An introduction to the physical principles behind energy, energy uses and their effect on the environment, suitable for science students and non-science students. Some of the included topics are: mechanical energy, conservation of energy, heat and work, production of energy (e.g Solar, Hydro, Wind and Nuclear).

  • High school algebra

General Physics I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019

An introductory physics class involving some laboratory work, suitable for students considering a Plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion.

  • Mathematical proficiency up through, but not necessarily including, calculus

General Physics II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2018

Second semester of the introductory physics class, suitable for students considering a plan in physics, science students or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include fluids, thermodynamics, oscillations, waves and optics.

Introduction to Experimental Physics
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

A laboratory course intended to give an introduction to experimental methods in physics. Topics include mechanics and thermodynamics. You will acquire familiarity with a variety of laboratory instruments, techniques and statistical tools. You will also learn how to record and present your observations and results. This class will help you to further develop experimental common sense and "physical intuition". Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Physics I or permission of the instructor

Modern Physics
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2017

An introduction to the major topics in modern physics, including wave-particle duality, the Schrodinger equation and its application to the structure of atoms and molecules and other topics.

  • NSC427 Electricity & Magnetism

Special Relativity
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2015

An introduction to Einstein's special relativity, investigating how this theory has changed our comprehension of space and time.  Special relativity can be understood without advanced mathematics, and this makes this course suitable both for science students and non-science students willing to know more about one of the theories that drastically changed our understanding of physics during the 20th century. Prerequisite: Proficiency in high school algebra

For Physics offerings, also see:

Calculus
Calculus II
Gadgets: An Electronics & Microcontroller Lab
Group Tutorial: Calculus III
Writing Math

Political Science

COMPARATIVE POLITICS: DEBATING DEMOCRACY
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2009

This course will offer a basic introduction to comparative government.  Democracy will serve as the organizing theme of our investigations, and various case studies, including the American political system, will be considered in some depth. Prerequisite: None

EMERSON, PRAGMATISM AND DEMOCRACY
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2009

This class considers democratic practices through the writings of one man, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and through the essays of one philosophical movement, pragmatism. Pragmatism," to quote Louis Menand, "is an account of the way people think." Pragmatists are interested in how we think because they believe that many political and social problems might be solved if we stopped using abstractions and started thinking in terms of practical consequences. Pragmatism has been called America's "only major contribution to philosophy." Given the American interest in work and productivity, perhaps we won't be surprised to find out that pragmatism takes philosophical techniques and renders them useful.

Pragmatism grew out of the polarizing discourse around slavery in the Civil War era. Much of the discussion will focus on the role of abstractions in Abolitionist and Pro-Slavery discourse. We'll consider why some of the early pragmatists, particularly Emerson, used metaphors and literature to make his new ideas work. Prerequisite: A background in political theory or philosophy.

THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2009

This course will examine the process of theory building and paradigm change during the first three qenerations of 3rd World development scholarship.  In particular, the three major schools of modernization, dependency, and post dependency theory will be analysed in light of their comparative contributions and limitations.  Theoretical discussions will be grounded in the empirical context of real life 3rd World development challenges. Prerequisite:  Social Sciences background or permission of Instructor

For Political Science offerings, also see:

ANGLO-AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION
FEMINIST POLITICAL & SOCIAL THOUGHT

Politics

African Politics
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

The continent of Africa remains to most students a distant and exotic land, difficult to imagine and even harder to understand. In this course, we will attempt to become familiar with this part of the world, its peoples, its history, its politics and its current predicaments. By studying the many different countries and regions that make up this continent, the goal will be to better appreciate, on the one hand, that which makes African politics so unique, rich, and diverse, yet at the same time to recognize the overwhelming similarities of the struggles of people everywhere. Prerequisite: None

African-American Political Thought
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2016

Since being brought to this country, African-American thinkers have pondered how a constitutionally-based democracy can justify the horrors of slavery, why a self-proclaimed Christian nation does not recognize the cross in the lynching tree, and why public policy never seems to address the containment of Black Americans. We'll study this heterodox tradition in American political thought - from Frederick Douglass to Reverend William Barber - to see how political language can hold both terror and hope, torture and redemption. Combining Judeo-Christian imagery, moral reasoning, and skillful hermeneutics, these authors provide the basis for a radical thinking that refuses to renounce some very conservative principles.

American Foreign Policy: Individuals, Institutions and Idealogies
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2015
Global Perspective

In this course, the makings of modern American Foreign Policy will be examined through the writings of those who helped to determine it. One of the main objectives of the class will be to study and critique the increasingly determining role of the United States in global affairs over the course of the past half century. But some of the more theoretical concerns of the course will focus on the question of agency: to what extent do individuals shape and change such national programs and/or to what extent does foreign policy remain structurally consistent over time and why. Prerequisite: This intermediate course is a natural follow up to International Relations Theory and/or Levels of Analysis, although neither class will be considered mandatory

American Political Thought
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019
Designated Writing

Since the Revolution, American political thinkers have debated whether to promote liberty over property, equality over tradition. Some of those debates have devolved into outright warfare. Some of them have expanded civil rights. Underneath all of these debates is the existential question of whether the United States operates as a republic, where decision-making involves ordinary people and conforms to the rule of law, or whether it operates as an oligarchy, where a few powerful people control the mechanisms of government.This class looks at three historical controversies – the abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, and the rights of workers in an industrialized economy. We'll read essays and speeches by Frederick Douglass, John Calhoun, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Carnegie, and Jane Addams to see how each of them envisions American politics. Students will develop skills in drafting arguments against powerful adversaries as well as understanding the reasoning behind republican and oligarchic points of view.

ANGLO-AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2010
Designated Writing

"Americans come to political thought," suggest Isaac Kramnick and Theodore Lowi, "because ideas have consequences." Unlike Europeans, who valued systematic thinking and the use of abstractions and formalisms, Americans have operated under the assumption that wisdom comes from experience. This class considers the various ideas of American political thinkers, from the Puritans to the postmoderns, along with their consequences. Along with primary readings, we'll also look at how one community in Roxbury, Massachusetts, used their experience during Boston's urban renewal to resist elite interests and become political actors. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Arab Springs: Reflections from North Africa
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2013

Just a few years ago, most Americans didn't even know where Tunisia was.  Today we have come to know it as home to the Arab Springs which yet continue to embroil so much of the Middle East.  In this class we will attempt to understand this historic event as it plays out in North Africa.  The class will appropriately begin with a focus on Tunisia before turning to Egypt and Libya in order to better understand not only what has happened, but more importantly to consider why.  Our attention will then turn to Algeria and Morocco as we ask what has or has not happened in these two countries as well. 

Debating the Good
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2010

Training in debate, an important component of education in many traditions, develops skills in critical thinking, public speaking, and the careful construction and assessment of arguments. Debate cultivates the kind of flexibility of thought that enables the sympathetic understanding of opposing perspectives while also helping to clarify one's own moral and intellectual views. It is also fun. Students in this course will learn debate skills; the majority of the class time will be devoted to actual debates. Prerequisite: permission of the instructors

EARLY MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2012

The early modern era was a time of great change. No longer could the Church dictate what was just nor could Monarchs claim that God was on their side. As markets emerged and religion divided, people began to rethink what it was that gave government authority. If not God nor dynasty, could it be mere mortals?

Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Spinoza were all outsiders. Teachers, exiles, and even an ex-communicant, these powerful political writers were, at the time of their writing, without political influence. They were, however, operating at a time when political energies exceeded existing institutions and new ways to think about good governance were in short supply. Along with the political theorists, we'll read Shakespeare's Hamlet and King Lear which will help situate our discussions about authority and freedom in the context of the Elizabethan crisis.

Course Objectives:

  • gain familiarity with the tradition of political theory;
  • practice recognizing and articulating political problems;
  • use political theory to provide solutions to the ongoing problems of governance
  • FEMINIST POLITICAL & SOCIAL THOUGHT
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2010

    How do women talk about their lives, their social situation, their political condition? This class looks at the writings of theorists and essayists who use words to make sense of women's place in the house, the community, the law. Prerequisite: Previous work in philosophy or political theory

    International Law & Organization
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2015
    Global Perspective

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2014
    Designated Writing
    Global Perspective

    This course will examine the major contending theories in the field of international relations today. The philosophical origins and traditions of contemporary realist, pluralist, globalist and post-modernist approaches will be considered, as will be their more current formulations and contributions. Prerequisite: None

    Levels of Analysis: Designing Field Work
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2014

    A research methods seminar for upper class students thinking about plan work and/or going abroad to study. The course will focus on "levels of analysis" when approaching research issues and topics. We will examine relevant theoretical considerations and consider applied, empirical representations through student presentations of their case studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Political Theory and the Ecological Crisis
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2011
    Designated Writing

    Political Theorists often write in times of crisis. When states are at war, when corruption rules supreme, political theorists step back and write down their thoughts. How can we live together? How should we organize our needs? What responsibility to we have to others? From Plato to Foucault, political theorists have wondered how we might better govern ourselves.This class considers the writings of prominent political theorists in the context of our current ecological crisis. The end of cheap oil will require new mechanisms for generating wealth and new arrangements for taking care of our basic needs. But it won't necessarily require new concepts. The goals for the class are two-fold: one will be to gain familiarity with classic texts in political theory; the other will be to apply those ideas to our current ecological crisis.

    RLP: The Medieval World
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2013

    This class considers the Western tradition from the Old Testament through Montaigne. Along with the Bible, we'll consider works by Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, and other Catholic and Islamic authors. All of these texts consider the relationship between nature and grace and how we might get closer to God from this mysterious place called earth.

    Spinoza and Freedom
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2018

    Branded a heretic by the Amsterdam Jewish community and a prophet by Deep Ecologists, Spinoza is not your ordinary political thinker. Rather than push for change through legislation and institutions, Spinoza encourages us to develop better encounters between our thoughts and our feelings and between ourselves and the natural world. Part of our effort, therefore, will be to develop skills in reading our emotional responses to the Very Difficult Matters that make us feel powerless and to figure out ways to form better agreements. This class will be useful to students interested in early modern political thought, social movements, and feminist theory. Prerequisite: Some background in political theory or philosophy and permission of the instructor

    Staging the Event
    (2.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2011

    How can cooperation enable us to become more active and experience more joy?

    Engaging in imaginative and collaborative action we can explore the ways that our habitual perceptions of reality shape our encounters.  Simultaneously, we can actively imagine ways of relating that disrupt existing conditions.

    We will consider this as the jumping off point for thought experiments and collaborative play, using our whole selves in composition with others.  The Campus Center will be our laboratory for engaging with and mobilizing the reading, getting a felt sense of how ideas can be practically applied.  Using a variety of methods, some self-created, others drawing from Theatre of the Oppressed, Nonviolent Communication, and the field of Somatics, we will stage encounters and act out events.  Journaling, art making, and discussion will give us tools to reflect on and express our experience, deepening our understanding of how we relate to self, and how we relate to the world.  Through collaborative work and play we will begin to explore what is created in common.  What will we do with it? Taught by student: Julianna Stevens and Austin Rose. Prerequisite: None

    The Land Ethic and Other Signs of Hope
    (4.00 Credits — )

    Fall 2012
    Designated Writing

     In 1949, Aldo Leopold argued that an evolving ethic will eventually include the rights of plants, animals and soil. Pointing to the progression of civil rights in the United States, Leopold suggests that just as slaves were eventually emancipated from their masters, so songbirds and topsoil will eventually be emancipated from their landowners.  This class considers the land ethic in the context of property relations in the United States, drawing on Marx, New Agrarianism and the African-American experience. We will apply these theories to the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative, a grassroots organization that eventually gained eminent domain in a distressed urban neighborhood.

    Prerequisite: some coursework in political theory or philosophy

    Theories of Development
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2014

    This course will examine the process of theory building and paradigm change during the first three qenerations of 3rd World development scholarship.  In particular, the three major schools of modernization, dependency, and post dependency theory will be analysed in light of their comparative contributions and limitations.  Theoretical discussions will be grounded in the empirical context of real life 3rd World development challenges. Prerequisite:  Social Sciences background or permission of instructor

    Thinking About World (Dis?)Order
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2011

    The world is changing right before our eyes.  But how it is changing, in what direction it is moving, and why - these questions continue to challenge some of the greatest thinkers of our time.  In this upper level, international relations seminar, we will attempt to uncover the various assumptions and/or intellectual traditions that frame the divergent discourses concerning the state of the world today. Prerequisite: Familiarity with International Relations Theory

    Thinking Politically
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2013
    Designated Writing

    According to Quentin Skinner, political actors face a two-fold problem. On the one hand, they must tailor existing "normative language" to fit their projects, and, on the other hand, they must tailor their projects to fit existing normative language. The history of political theory then is the history of actors creating legitimacy for certain political projects through normative arguments and arguments gaining legitimacy through political action.

    From this rich political history, several different schools of thought have emerged, such as utilitarianism, liberalism, socialism, communitarianism, feminism, and libertarianism. We will use debate, forum posts, and short essays to explore these various ideologies  and their political implications. The effort will be to make political actions more persuasive and political theory more applicable. Prerequisite: None

    Writing Political Subjectivity
    (2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2012

    A tutorial exploring the uses of poetry, storytelling, and personal narrative as political mediums. Using contemporary political theory and medical anthropology, we will examine how writing enhances political subjectivity, particularly through the restructuring of memory. This tutorial will also explore teaching strategies that encourage student self-empowerment.

    Writing Political Theory
    (6.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Fall 2018

    This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. May be repeated for credit.

    • Must be a Senior
    • Courses in politics

    For Politics offerings, also see:

    CHINA'S PROBLEMS SINCE MAO
    Contemporary Political & Social Thought
    ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS & POLICY
    History of Political Life in the U.S. II
    Intermediate Microeconomics
    Origins of the Contemporary World
    Political Rituals
    RUSSIA & THE CAUCASUS
    Seminar in Religion, Literature & Philosophy I
    The Idea of Russia
    The Soviet Era Through Film and Memoir
    Topics in Human Understanding: Writing Strange
    U.S. CAPITALISM
    Who Owns the Land?
    Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment

    Psychology

    Abnormal Psychology
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2019

    An analysis of the major approaches to abnormal psychology and the resulting theories of personality. Prerequisite: Child Development, Persistent Problems in Psychology

    Adolescence and the Family
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2019

    An examination of the family and the emerging adolescent in the family.

    Brain and Behavior
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2019

    An introduction to the neuroscience of the brain and its impact on behavior.

    Child Development
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2018

    The course will:

  • Introduce, compare and contrast major child development theorists
  • Lay out an overview of cognitive, linguistic and social child development for infancy to early/mid childhood
  • Help students explore child development in other countries/cultures
  • Engage students in analyzing child development through the lens of race, class and gender  
  • EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2014

    A seminar to define the principles and processes of an educational psychology. Prerequisite: Introduction of any social science

    PERCEPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2012

    A study of the physiology and psychology of perception, the means by which we maintain contact with and obtain knowledge about the environment. Participants will be required to conduct a series of empirical projects throughout the semester. Prerequisite: A year of Psychology, Sociology, or Biology, or permission of instructor

    Persistent Problems of Psychology
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2019

    An introduction to the history and theory of Psychology, offering a survey of psychology's major perspectives.

    Psychology and Literature: A Study of Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Science Fiction Literature
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2017
    Designated Writing

    Post-apocalyptic and dystopian literature have often been prime methods of exploring our fears as a culture. Our fears can manifest as an end-of-the-world scenario, or fears of technology, or a government abusing their power over our lives. In this class we will read novels, short stories, and comics that explore different facets of dystopian and post-apocalyptic anxieties. These narratives use different devices to reflect the fears and anxieties of the time they were written, but are also reflective of our current political and social world. As this is a designated writing course, students will produce a sufficient number of pages to submit to the Clear and Concise Writing Portfolio, though there will not be an extensive editing phase as there would be in a Writing Seminar. Writing is important to understanding the material and for demonstrating critical thought about the topic. There will be options for extra credit which will enrich our understanding of the material and make for a more fun final paper. This course will be co-taught by Robyn Manning-Samuels and Sophie Gorjance.

    Psychotherapies
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Fall 2019

    Major theories of personality are discussed and compared. The emphasis is on the underlying assumptions regarding persons and the therapies and psychotherapies which have emerged.

    • Abnormal Psychology or permission of instructor

    Self and Social Interaction
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2018

    The course will focus on socialization through the life course, self and self-presentation, altruism and empathy, and moral development. Throughout the semester, we will investigate people’s behavior stemming from participation in social groups, interactions in various contexts, and the effects of the cultural environment and social structures on individual identity formation. Students will periodically collect and analyze data through interviews and/or observations, and produce analytic essays that apply course concepts and theories to explain aspects of human social behavior.

    SEMINAR ON COGNITION
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Spring 2014

    This tutorial is a multidisciplinary approach to the function and concept of cognition through author's in the fields psychology and philosophy. The topics included memory, language, and thinking.

    For Psychology offerings, also see:

    SEMINAR IN RELIGION & PSYCHOLOGY

    Religion

    Contemplative Learning and the Study of Mysticism
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2013

    This course explores some of the ways in which contemplative disciplines can contribute to the academic study of religion in a liberal arts setting. Using techniques of mindfulness practice we will attempt to broaden and deepen our experience of reading and writing, listening and conversing. We will read texts from a variety of traditions in order to examine the inner aspects of religious faith and practice usually classified under the term mysticism. Some of the questions we will explore include: How do practitioners define and describe their own endeavors? What are the techniques and disciplines employed in achieving the goals of this inner quest? If mysticism is seen as a path, then what is the nature of the inner path(s) and what kinds of challenges does it present to the seeker? And finally, what is the nature of mystical experience and is language sufficient to express realities that mystics claim to experience?

    Eastern Orthodox Christianity
    (2.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2014

    An introduction to the theology, ritual, and contemplative practices of the Eastern Orthodox tradition. Prerequisite: None

    HINDUISM
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2009

    An introduction to the diverse religious traditions that constitute Hinduism. In addition to studying ritual, philosophy, and symbolism, we will pay special attention to the role of mythology within Hinduism. We will devote a good part of the semester to reading the Mahabharata with a focus on the Bhagavad Gita as a text that synthesizes diverse strands of Hindu religious thought. Prerequisite: None

    Introduction to Islam
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2015
    Global Perspective

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental teachings presented in the foundational texts of Islam and elaborated in Islamic ritual, arts and literature. Our aim, through studying the Qur'an and the life and teachings of the prophet Muhammad, is to grasp the internal logic of the Islamic worldview and the vocabulary used to articulate the vision of Islam. This work will provide the basis for examining the divergence within later (classical and modern) Muslim interpretations concerning questions of theology, human development and perfection, leadership and the organization of communities. Prerequisite: None

    Introduction to Native North American Religious Traditions
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2011

    This course will introduce the diversity of native traditions as well as elucidate various approaches to religious studies. Using literary texts and film we will explore the life ways and sacred ecology of Native Americans. Specific attention will be placed on the Lakota peoples of the great plains and the Puebloan peoples of the southwest. Together we will examine methodological issues regarding the study of myth and symbolism, theories of harmony and kinship, the transmission of knowledge and power, the dynamism of sacred narrative and ceremony as well as rites of initiation and healing. We will use case studies to examine contested issues; including, the encounter of traditional life ways with modern secular society, appropriation of ceremonies, social justice, and freedom of religion. Prerequisite: None

    Introduction to the Comparative Study of Religion
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2013
    Global Perspective

    This course is an introduction to the comparative study of religion based around the perennial question that faces every student of world religions: Are different religious traditions many paths that lead to the same goal?

    ISLAMIC INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2013

    A study of Islamic thinkers in philosophy, Sufism, Jurisprudence, and theology.

    Plan Writing Seminar
    (2.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Fall 2019

    Writing seminar for seniors. Students not completing a plan in religion can take this course as well but need permission of the instructor. This course can be taken for two to six credits.

    READING RUMI
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Spring 2010

    This course examines the life and teachings of Jalaluddin Rumi (d. 1273), one of the most influential Muslim scholars, mystics, and teachers in the Persianate Islamic world. While we will study the historical, religious, and intellectual context in which Rumi grew up, the main focus of this course is to read closely excerpts from his prose and poetry. Topics to be covered include theology, modes of human knowing, the nature of revelation, relationship between outward observances and the inner path, sanctity, and the relationship between the spiritual guide and the seeker. In the last part of the course we will focus on problems of cultural translation as highlighted by Rumi's current popularity in America. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor

    RLP
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2014
    Global Perspective

    This class considers the Greater Western tradition from the Hebrew Bible through Montaigne. Along with the Bible and the Qur'an, we will consider works by Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Ghazali and other medieval authors. Prerequisite: None

    SEMINAR IN RELIGION & PSYCHOLOGY
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2018

    An introduction to religious living through literature, original religious texts, and psychology. The assigned readings will cover a few concepts and issues of religious experience, e.g., one and the many, reason and imagination, contextualization. Prerequisite: None

    Seminar In Religion, Literature & Philosophy I
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2013
    Global Perspective

    A year-long course, reading and discussing some of the major works of Western culture from Homer to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required.

    Sources & Methods in Religious Studies
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2019

    An examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion.

    The Sacred Cosmos: Geometrical and Architectural Symbols of Unity in Premodern Islam
    (2.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2013

    This course is an introduction to a mode of thinking, prevalent in premodern cultures, that seeks to unify seemingly disparate phenomenon through making qualitative correspondences. We will begin with an overview of the Quadrivium of the classical liberal arts of number, geometry, music, and cosmology in order to grasp how geometry is number in space, music is number in time, and how the cosmos expresses number in space and time. The bulk of the course will be an examination of the manner in which the symbolism of number and geometry was used by premodern Muslim thinkers to visualize and express a vision of reality unified around a transcendent center. We will conclude by exploring some manifestations of these ideas in premodern Islamic art and architecture.

    Wrestling with Ancestors: Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2018
    Global Perspective

    This course is an introduction two Chinese schools of thought and practice: Confucianism and Daoism. We will read the foundational texts in each school. Discussion will focus on ideas of morality, social relations, self-cultivation, good government and nature. We will also consider the historical context of the primary texts as well as their influence on religious practice and art. Students will engage in a close analysis of key terms through quizzes, journaling and reflection papers. Prerequisite: None

    For Religion offerings, also see:

    Making Way: Daoist Ritual and Practice
    Reading RLP: The Ancient World
    Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II

    Sculpture

    Sculpture I
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2018

    In this class the students will be introduced to the language of sculpture through the use of traditional and non-traditional materials and techniques. Much of our time will be spent on sculpture assignments and independent work in the studios. We also will visit exhibitions, artists’ studios, view relevant films, and create PowerPoint presentations to explore aspects of sculpture from the time of the cave-dwellers to today’s most innovative artists. Through rigorous discussion and debate, we will learn to evaluate our own place as makers of things, and above all, discover and develop our own sensibilities in a lively and safe environment.

    Additional Fee:$ 90

    Sculpture II - The Object as Idea
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2016

    "The object at the exactest point at which it is itself." Thus poet Wallace Stevens describes how objects might be seen. This is a course in the identification of and action on sculptural ideas. Projects in conceptual development, figure modeling, and the interaction of drawing and sculpture will be given. Technical areas such as waste-mold making will be introduced.

    Additional Fee:$80

    • Sculpture 1 or permission of instructor

    The Body
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2011

    Sculpture has always been concerned at many levels with the human form but in recent decades the term ,"The Body", has indicated another aspect of this concern. Artists such as Kiki Smith, Robert Gober, Matthew Barney, Antony Gormley, Louise Bourgeois, Marina Abramovic and many others have created sculpture, installation, performance, and diverse other pieces that deal with issues of the political, sexual, medical, and theatrical uses of the Body. This course will ask students to make work that responds to a new understanding of the human corpus. Materials and techniques will be diverse and intertwined with the intention of each participant. Research into artists working in this realm will be included. This course is linked to Theory in Art Practice which meets Thursday, 9-10:20. Prerequisite: A college course in sculpture

    Video Installation
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2016

    This tutorial will offer a plan level discourse on video installation which will guide me to a successful plan exhibit, since a large portion of it will be video installation. The artist whom I'm writing a paper on for plan is David Hall, a video installation and television artist who will be a discussed in the tutorial as well as other video installation pioneers such as Nam June Paik, Gary Hill, Bill Viola, Gary Hill and Tony Oursler. Video installation involves sculptural elements, which will be covered in the tutorial.

    For Sculpture offerings, also see:

    Architecture as Sculpture/Sculpture as Architecture
    Form & Place - The Art Of Site-Specific Sculpture

    Sociology

    CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Spring 2012

    The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: Introductory course in sociology or permission of instructor; history and/or philosophy helpful.

    Contemporary American Society
    (3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2010

    The evolution of and interrelationship between American social, economic and political institutions focusing on the period from the end of World War II to the present. Prerequisite: None

    Contemporary Political & Social Thought
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Fall 2010

    Issues crucial to an understanding of the crisis of the 20th century will be explored through the work of Arendt, Barnet, Vidich, Kolko and Elizabeth Genovese. Prerequisite: None

    Food, Waste, and Justice
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2013

    This course will explore the politics of food and waste systems from an environmental justice lens. Topics covered will include the food justice movement, systems of food production, distribution, and consumption, globalization and the export of environmental hazards, social and ecological injustice, and the polluter-industrial complex. Prerequisite: Introductory course in the Social Sciences or Sociological Theory

    Gender and Society
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2013

    Every day, gender norms and prescriptions shape the way we think about, act within, and discuss the world we live in. From birth, people are separated into categories of male and female, and are subsequently treated differently based on the roles that are assigned by the dominant culture.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which societal expectations and our own perceptions of sexuality, violence, family, religion, education, health, work, and public policy are shaped by gender.  We will study theories of masculinity and femininity, as we cannot understand one without an analysis of the other.  We will also explore in depth the concept of gender beyond the exclusive dichotomy of male and female.

    It is my goal that each of you will leave this course with a comprehension of the sociological understanding that gender is not essential, but rather that it is a social construction and a complex process that is continuously created, maintained, and transformed.

    Inequality and "Natural" Disasters
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2012

    How do societies respond to disaster, and what does this tell us about the human condition?  What makes certain communities more vulnerable to disaster, or more able to adapt after a disaster has occurred? We will examine in depth the different analytical frameworks used to understand vulnerability, mitigation, and adaptation to disaster.  We will also discuss the intricacies and inadequacies of the term "natural disaster,” looking at the different definitions of disaster in sociological literature.

    This course operates on the premise that disasters are essentially social events that reflect back to us the way we live and structure our communities.  We will study theories of social vulnerability that illustrate the social, economic, political, cultural, and geographical factors that put people at risk before, during and after disasters. 

    Introduction to Sociology
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2014

    This course introduces the student to the theories and perspectives of sociology. We will explore a variety of substantive areas within the field, touching on many of the major subfields. These include the social formation of behavior and identity, the sociology of emotions, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social class and its reproduction, social structure and inequality, environmental justice, and social movements. Prerequisite: None

    Research Methods
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Spring 2015

    This course provides an introduction to research methods often employed in anthropology and sociology. Through a mix of readings and fieldwork, students will learn the basics of survey design, participant observation, interviewing techniques, evaluation analysis, and ethnography. We will also discuss the ethical considerations fundamental to conducting research with human participants. Each student will leave this course having crafted a research proposal for use in their Plan, study abroad work, a fellowship, or a research paper, and run this proposal through IRB.

    All students wishing to pursue Plan work in Sociology are required to take this course. Prerequisite: Introductory level work in the social sciences

    Social Problems
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2013

    In this course, we will explore a variety of “social problems,” key issues facing contemporary society, from a sociological perspective. In particular, we will discuss the nature and character of social problems and their construction, the way social problems are framed by their claims-makers and opponents, and the various theoretical paradigms that may be applied to these areas.  This course asks: How does power - of claims-makers, of activists, of the media, and of the state - play into our perceptions of what constitutes a social problem?  How do race, gender, class, sexuality and nation inflect everyday life and macro level structures? What is the benefit of applying a sociological lens to social problems? The course will explore a range of issues from homelessness to the prison industrial complex to reproductive rights.  A primary learning goal is to develop critical thinking skills that will allow you to question and critique both your own ideas about social issues as well as information presented to you by the media and the people around you. We will also devote significant attention to social movements organized in response to each issue covered in this course. 

    Sociological Theory
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Fall 2013

    This course will explore the classical texts of sociological theory and examine how they manifest in contemporary sociological theory. This course is required for anybody who wishes to do a Plan in Sociology. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology or Introduction to Anthropology

    The Politics of Education
    (2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2013

    A seminar on the relationship between political and educational  institutions, focusing on the ways in which students are socialized to both participate in and resist mainstream society. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology, Classical Sociological Thought, or permission of instructor

    WHIP - Exploring the Health and Wellness of College Students
    (1.00 Credit — Introductory)

    Fall 2017

    Alcohol and other drug use. STIs. Eating disorders. Stress. Relationship violence. On their own, these issues of health and wellness can be difficult to discuss, but when placed within the context of a college campus, they take on an entirely different meaning. In WHIP, or Wellness and Health Informed Peers, participants will explore and reflect on the concepts of health and wellness through the lens of both their own experience as well as their peers around them. As we meet only once a week, attendance at all sessions is required. Prerequisite: None

    For Sociology offerings, also see:

    ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT & THEORY
    Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective
    EVERYDAY LIFE IN LATIN AMERICA
    Introduction to Anthropology
    Modernity & Postmodernity in Cultural History
    SENSES OF PLACE
    Statistics
    U.S. CAPITALISM

    Theater

    Acting I
    (3.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2018

    This is a practical theatre course that explores various skills and techniques to assist in developing an understanding of the processes of acting. Analysis, interpretation, collaboration, improvisation, relaxation, and critique all contribute to the composite demands required in performance. The course will consist of various exercises, monologue work, and attendance at performance events.

    Acting II
    (3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2017

    Acting II is an intermediate course designed to continue the training and development of actors with previous class/performance experience. The goal of the class is to expand knowledge and skills gained in Acting I. Exercises and scene study work will culminate in a final scene project with partners. There is significant rehearsal time outside of class. Prerequisite: Acting I

    Acting Seminar in Period Styles
    (3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2015

    Robert Barton has noted, "We perceive style in terms of our expectations." From the expansiveness of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays to the taut control of Noel Coward's texts, this class will give us the opportunity to interrogate our own expectations as we explore the possibilities of theatrical performance within the context of period plays. The course will include fight scenes choreographed by Jodi Clark and require rehearsal time outside of the designated class period. Prerequisite: Acting 1 and permission of the instructor

    Actor as Thinker
    (4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Fall 2010

    This course will examine ways that actors purposefully shape interpretation of scripted dramas through choices made about representation of character, modes of interaction in relationships, and implementation of actions that shape performance. We will begin with studies of a few model scripts and actor interpretations, using film/video to examine performance choices and techniques . We will conclude with students’ presentations of capstone character studies. Permission of the instructor required for registration.

    Borders, Boundaries, & Crossings
    (4.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Spring 2014

    Which presentation of myself

    Would make you want to touch

    What would make you cross the border

    Savage/Love, Sam Shepard and Joseph Chaikin

    This class will be an exploration of the ways in which we construct and perform narratives of identity. Employing perspectives from performance, gender, and global studies we will combine theory and practice through a series of workshop projects, including classes led by renowned Cuban-American performance artist Carmelita Tropicana who will be in residency at Marlboro this spring. The class will culminate in a workshop showing of student written performance pieces.  Prerequisite: intermediate performance class and permission of instructor

    DIRECTING
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2011

    An examination of principles of directing from script analysis to rehearsal and staging techniques with a focus on working with actors and crew.

    INTRODUCTION TO ACTING
    (3.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2012

    This course functions as an introduction to the fundamentals of stage performance through ensemble and scene work, physical and vocal exercises, improvisation, theatre games, compositions, and monologues. Students are encouraged to explore acting through actions and objectives: focusing less on “performing” and more on “doing” as performers; trusting impulses; and allowing creativity, imagination, and spontaneity to develop them as actors.

    Performing Normalcy
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2018

    Employing disability studies, performance studies, and history as the framework, this course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the ways in which cultural definitions of disability are articulated, represented, and subverted. The class will incorporate essays, plays, films, pop culture critiques, first person accounts, and historical documents to examine disability and the politics of representation. Representative films include: Freaks, The Shape of Water, The Station Agent, Monica and David, and The Greatest Showman.

       

    Serve, Turn, Werq: A History of Drag Theatre and Performance
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2013

    This course explores the history of cross-gendered, “drag” performance in theatre and popular entertainment from the ancient Greeks to the twenty-first century. Some topics of study include shamanism and pre-historic ritual, ancient comedy, the Shakespearean boy player, Jingju and Kabuki  traditions, breeches roles, music hall and vaudeville performance, boys and girls’ schools and drag as rite of passage, the Harlem Renaissance, the Queer community and the advent of camp, and “genderf*ck”  performance.

    Prerequisite: None

    Staging the Apocalypse
    (4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2016
    Global Perspective

    In this interdisciplinary course we will explore the ways in which contemporary playwrights portray a vision of the secular apocalyptic. As with Vaçlav Havel’s assessment of Absurdism, apocalyptic plays can be read as “not scenes from life, but theatrical images of the basic modalities of humanity in a state of collapse.” We’ll take an expansive perspective on the definition of “apocalyptic” and read/view works from other disciplines such as Margaret Atwood’s novel Oryx and Crake, the poetry of Japanese women following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in White Flash/Black Rain and the BBC docudrama Threads. Students will also take a field trip to NYC as part of the class and the final project will be an expression of their own apocalyptic vision. Prerequisite: None

    The World on Stage and Screen
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2011

    A survey of how dramatic narratives are composed in cinematic models from around the globe. The focus of studies will involve close viewings of over 20 films from a variety of cultures — all are in foreign languages and must be viewed with sub-titles. Class exchanges will relate elements of the movies to theatrical traditions from various regions and specific countries. Seminar style discussion will require preparation of response perspectives. Assessment mechanisms will include mid-term and end of semester exams.

    .

    For Theater offerings, also see:

    AMERICA ON STAGE AND SCREEN

    Visual Arts

    Architecture as Sculpture/Sculpture as Architecture
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2017

    Sculptors and architects share a language of three dimensions that leads to diverse points of contact between their art forms. This course will be an artist's look at buildings and sculpture from various cultures and periods of history. Responses will be in three forms: written research projects, sculpture and building designs.  Prerequisite: Three Dimensional Design or permission Additional Fee: $75.00

    Additional Fee:$80.

    Art Seminar Critique
    (2.00 Credits — Advanced)

    Fall 2018

    This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. Student will share work and writing as well as present on artists of influence. An overview of professional practices will also be included. This is a required course for seniors on Plan in the Visual Arts. The class meets Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:20 except the five days there will be visiting artists when the meeting time is 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

    • Preliminary or Final Plan Application on file or by instructors permission

    Ceramics I
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2011

    This course will introduce students to the primary forming methods in ceramics as well as providing the building blocks for a technical understanding of the material and processes. Students will be encouraged in a variety of making techniques working both sculpturally and functionally. Prerequisite: None   Additional Fee: $90

    DRAWING I
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2014

    A beginning course designed to develop skills and knowledge in seeing. A variety of tools and materials will be explored while working from the still life, landscape and the figure. Fundamental issues of line, shape, tonal value, composition and design elements will be our basis of investigation. Materials fee: $50. Prerequisite: None

    Form & Place - The Art Of Site-Specific Sculpture
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2015

    As sculpture moved off the pedestal in the first half of the 20th century it found new relationships to its place in the world. The development of earth art, installation art, and site-specific sculpture have created a realm of activity for sculptors which has been varied and rich. At first a male dominated and environmentally risky field it has been immensely broadened by the actions of many women like Anna Mendieta, Mierle Ukeles and others whose works were more in tune with their environment. Through a series of projects and investigations of places and objects, including light and sound, mapping, indoor and outdoor installations, and modelmaking, students will create a series of works. Prerequisite: Sculpture I and at least one other art course or permission of instructor

    Additional Fee: $80.00

    From Drawing to Print
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2012

    A beginning course designed to develop skills and knowledge in seeing. A variety of tools and materials will be explored while working from the still life, landscape and the figure. Fundamental issues of line, shape, tonal value, composition and design elements will be our basis of investigation. From these strategies we will move into printmaking processes, to include intaglio, relief, mono-type and non traditional printing practices. Prerequisite: None

    Additional Fee:$75

    Functional Ceramics Intensive
    (4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2014

    This workshop will examine all the components of a table service. Focusing on continuity and diversity within their designs, students will make settings that create a visual and functional feast. Making methods will not be limited to wheel-throwing. Readings will be drawn from Material Culture Theory, contemporary Craft Theory and Philosophy to expand the foundation of ideas functional production may draw from. There will be a written component and field trips required in this class. Prerequisite: Two ceramics classes or permission of the instructor

    Additional Fee: $100

    INTAGLIO PRINTMAKING/DRAWING
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2011

    This course will introduce students to a range of printmaking techniques including relief, intaglio, and monoprinting. In addition there will be opportunity to experiment with optional processes such as collagraph and silkscreen printing. The class will work from direct observation to include still life, landscape, the figure and a range of historical and contemporary sources. Active parallel work in drawing will be required. Concurrent registration in ART 2265, Theory in Art Practice, is encouraged. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

    INTERMEDIATE DRAWING
    (4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2017

    This course is designed to build on basic drawing skills by implementing a variety of tools and materials. Fundamental issues of line, shape, tonal value, composition, color and design elements will be our first basis of investigation, coupled with identification of personal directions in drawing, including working with the figure, narrative and conceptual strategies. Experiments in mono-printing will be included. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

    Additional Fee:$70

    • College level Drawing 1 course

    KINETIC SCULPTURE
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2010

    Artists who create forms that move have been active since antiquity. Using simple techniques students will make kinetic sculpture that are powered by hand as well as by simple motors. Prerequisite: A college level sculpture course

    Landscape Painting & Drawing
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2013

    The core of this course will be working outside directly from observation, investigating our perception of the landscape through experimentation with various approaches and materials. Initially we will use drawing materials moving into water-based materials and color. Emphasis will be placed on individual response supported by directed assignments. Periodically we will frame our work towards environmental issues. Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or Studio Art or permission of instructorAdditional Fee: $50

    Narrative Painting
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2014

    Painting in the last 30 years has seen a struggle for a balance between form and content. Should the way a picture looks rule the artists' choices or should they be ruled by what the picture signifies?  The course asks students to approach this question. Prerequisite: Painting I, or Drawing 1, Studio Art, or permission of the instructor  Additional Fee: $75

    Painting I
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2013

    This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, landscape and self directed projects. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructorAdditional Fee: $75

    Printmaking Intensive
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2016

    This course will introduce students to a range of printmaking techniques including relief, intaglio and monoprinting. In addition there will be opportunity to experiment with alternative processes such as collagraph and large scale work. The class will work from direct observation to include still life, landscape, the figure as well as a range of historical and contemporary sources. Active parallel work in drawing will be required. This class requires collaboration and the ability to focus and sustain work outside of class time. Some experience with drawing is helpful.

    Additional Fee: $100

    • Drawing 1 or Studio Art or permission of instructor

    Sculpture I
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2015

    In this class students will be introduced to the language of sculpture through the use of traditional and non-traditional materials and techniques. Much of our time will be spent on sculpture assignments and independent work in the studios. We also will visit exhibitions, artists’ studios, view relevant films and create PowerPoint presentations to explore aspects of sculpture from the time of the cave-dwellers to today’s most innovative artists. Through rigorous discussion and debate, we will learn to evaluate our own place as makers of things, and above all, discover and develop our own sensibilities in a lively and safe environment.

    Additional Fee: $90.00

    Studio Art I
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2013

    Like stretching before the big race, this course is designed to get our creative juices flowing.  Focused on the formal elements of line, texture, shape, space and structure in a variety of materials, students will be asked to delve into developing a personal aesthetic vocabulary.  This is a foundation course for the visual arts designed to provide a base for further work in the visual arts curriculum. Prerequisite: None

    Additional Fee:$75

    THE CONSTRUCTED REALITY
    (4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2013

    The histories of photography and, more recently, sculpture/installation art, are rife with examples of artists who are not content to simply observe reality as it exists but who find it necessary to construct their own. This course will focus on the conjunction of the disciplines of sculpture and photography and provide a venue for students to make work that reflects their own constructed reality. The end product of the work of this class will sometimes be photographs and, in other projects, sculpture. Both skills will be employed in each. Objects and spaces will be transformed and become the subject of new work. Students will be encouraged to work collaboratively. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisite: Photography I or permission of instructors

    Additional Fee:$100

    Theory in Art Practice
    (2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2011

    In this course we will trace the themes and questions that run across different art disciplines, with a focus on the role of the body in art production and experience. Throughout the semester students will be exposed to different art practices and movements, highlighting the connections, conceptual as well as material, between different art disciplines. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a practice based intermediate level course in either the performing or the visual arts.

    Three Dimensional Design
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2017

    This course explores the language of objects. We are surrounded by things and take them for granted, but each item was made by a process of design. In a series of problems, students will be asked to design and build a chair, a package, and a game. Problems will focus on structure, presentation, and invention. The development of design styles will be studied as well. While Sculpture I explores the language of three dimension from a representational and expressive point of view, this course approaches the same language from the point of view of a problem solver. The inventive artistic result of this problem solving is often remarkable. Prerequisite: None Additional Fee:$80.

    Additional Fee:$100

    • None

    Topics - A project-based semester of visual arts instruction
    (3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2014

    This semester the Visual arts faculty will accept proposals from all students for projects in ceramics, sculpture, installation, video, photography, painting, drawing and printmaking. We have two themes that will frame the work of the semester.

    1.      Work that explores issues of time, transition and sense of place

    2.      Work that explores the human figure

    Readings, visual presentations, and discussion sessions held though out the semester will form the context for these themes.

    To register for this special semester, please fill out the application form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1G0DZpS11Rz_60CWmOs-1TY8uF1vi28ZN1ACnwm-KvHM/viewform. You will need to indicate the theme on which you will focus and the credit level you intend (2-3-4 or more by faculty approval) and write a paragraph describing your medium (s) and project and its basis in ideas. During intro-class period in January the faculty will review and help refine these proposals.

    Once each week (Mondays 1:00 – 3:20) students will meet with a mixed-medium group of other students working within their chosen theme and a lead faculty member(s) for critique and instruction. The other session (Thursdays at 1:00pm) will be a medium-specific meeting i.e. photographers meeting together, ceramics together etc. or individual meetings to help with processes.

    In addition the arts faculty will offer introductory courses for those who wish to begin working within a medium they have never attempted. This course is offered for variable credit.

    Sculpture  – SegarPrintmaking – OsmanPhotography – WillisCeramics – Lantin 

    Prerequisite: A working knowledge of the medium of your project

    Works on Paper - Transformations & Experiments
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2015

    With an emphasis on process, students will be encouraged to explore collage, mixed media, three dimensional relief and monoprinting as a way of generating opportunities for the unexpected; of subject matter, process and rethinking the definitions of working with and on paper. Prerequisite: None: but Drawing I or Studio Art would be helpful

    Additional Fee: $75

    For Visual Arts offerings, also see:

    Digital Multimedia
    Intermediate & Advanced Photography Plan Seminar
    Introduction to Photography
    Painting II
    Photography & The Body
    Sculpture II

    World Studies Program

    Designing Fieldwork
    (3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Fall 2013
    Global Perspective

    Required for WSP students; Open to non-WSP students. This course is designed to acquaint students who are preparing for independent research with a diverse range of fieldwork methods.  We will consider matters of epistemology, access, observation, interviewing and surveying, collecting, note taking and reporting.  Cross-cultural challenges and the ethics of fieldwork will also feature in our discussions.  Over the course of the semester, students will develop Internship Proposals that describe their academic and professional goals, explaining what they expect to learn; the methods of their independent work; resources found and still needed; and how the work will be evaluated. These proposals function as learning contracts for their academic sponsors, requests for funding for scholarship organizations, and presentation pieces for hosting organizations.

    Finding an Internship
    (1.00 Credit — Introductory)

    Spring 2019

    While in this class, students will be asked to reflect on their personal and professional skills, values, interest and goals in order to prepare themselves to identify and pursue an internship or job that will be meaningful to them. Students will explore and identify themselves as an individual, as a member of a shared culture, and within the context of a foreign culture, as it relates to skills needed to succeed professionally and personally while crossing cultures. Expected outcomes of the course are a professional resume and cover letter, improved networking and interview skills and proposal writing preparation, as well as strategies for dealing with culture shock and professional differences in a multicultural workplace. This course is applicable to non-WSP students as well.The course consists of 8 classes, which each meet for 1.5 hours.

    Origins of the Contemporary World
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2018
    Global Perspective

    An introductory seminar designed to help students begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically. We will cover a handful of theoretical approaches to contemporary history as well as trace the historical threads of a number of major events outwards in time and space.  Student work will include presentations identifying the influence or resonance of the major events of the course.  The theoretical approaches will allow us to consider major themes of the recent past including: colonialism, genocide, human rights, socialism, globalization, and environmental change.  Required for WSP students; Open to non-WSP students. Prerequisite: None

    TESOL Certificate I
    (3.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2017

    This course will introduce participants to the field of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages). They begin with a language learning experience from which they can extract principles of learning. They identify the main factors that affect second language acquisition, and the practices that facilitate and support language learning and cross cultural communication. They will build a foundation in English pronunciation, lexicon and grammar so that they understand the particular challenges English language learners face. They will learn to design lessons that use a communicative, interactive approach. They will implement these lessons in peer teaching sessions in class. The certificate is designed for people who may wish to teach English abroad or tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall, 3 credits & Spring, 3 credits), complete a teaching internship (1 credit) and compile a portfolio. 

    Additional Fee:$1400

    TESOL Certificate II
    (3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2016

    Participants will continue to develop knowledge and skills as teachers of English to speakers of other languages. This term the focus will be on teaching the four skills (listening, reading, speaking and writing), lesson planning, classroom management, inter-cultural communication and receiving and giving feedback. They will design lessons for children and adults that use a communicative, interactive approach. They will implement these lessons in peer teaching sessions in class.  In addition they will prepare for their teaching practice by compiling a portfolio of lesson plans and gathering information about their teaching context. After the internship they will critically explore the role of English in the world today, including socio-political factors that affect English language learning in other countries.

    The certificate is designed for those who may wish to teach English abroad or to tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall & Spring), complete a TESOL teaching internship and compile a portfolio. 

    TESOL Certificate Teaching Practice
    (1.00 Credit — Intermediate)

    Spring 2016

    The TESOL certificate internship consists of practice teaching and intercultural training. This will take the form of an internship in an ESOL context during Spring Break. It is required in order to qualify for the certificate. Working in teaching teams, students will: prepare a coherent 8-day course for their respective class level (Beginner 1, young adults, Beginner 1 – children, Intermediate 1 - adults); teach a minimum of 6 hours of classes individually, although planning is done collaboratively; observe peers teaching; give and receive feedback on each day’s lessons in teaching group with trainer; attend daily workshops (determined according trainee teachers’ needs) which may include: Compassionate Communication, Feedback or Inter-cultural communication. 

    Additional Fee:$1400

    • TESOL Certificate II

    Topics in Human Understanding
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2012

    This course is designed to encourage an examination of questions concerning the unity and diversity of the human situation in the world society of cultures.  The purpose of the course is not a deep exploration of each of those cultures or even of any one of them; rather, the purpose is to engage in that process of analysis in a variety of different ways, so as better to understand ourselves in relation to other people from other cultures.  This will help students prepare for cross-cultural work, by beginning to become comfortable with unfamiliarity and to understand that cultural differences, recognizable even in brief encounters, reach far beyond obvious variety to profound distinctions in worldview. Further, we will try to build some skill in recognizing and outlining the lines of thinking which could be pursued to gain cross-cultural understanding in future academic work both in the classroom and in the field.

    Topics in Human Understanding: Writing Strange
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2012

    This class considers various contemporary strategies to make the familiar strange in order to know it. Some of our authors use Marxist analysis to show the political and economic relationships between seemingly distant peoples.  Some of the authors practice the close reading of an anthropologist, providing thick descriptions of resistance, compliance and cockfights. And some of the authors make familiar and unfamiliar landscapes strange by bringing in non-human actors and super human forces.

    Course Objectives:

  • to become intimate with the terms and visions of contemporary political theory;
  • to practice descriptive writing about political encounters;
  • to analyze different political situations using contemporary political theory.
  • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    World Studies Program Colloquium
    (1.00 Credit — Introductory)

    Fall 2016
    Global Perspective

    The World Studies Colloquium seeks to introduce students both to the World Studies Program and to other international opportunities and resources at Marlboro. Through discussions with Marlboro staff, faculty, and other students, Colloquium students will learn the intellectual and experiential objectives of the World Studies Program, what services the Office of International Services offers, and how best they might venture into the world to pursue their academic interests.  

    World Studies Senior Seminar
    (1.00 Credit — Advanced)

    Fall 2014
    Global Perspective

    A ten-week seminar addressing cultural differences and adaptation, and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Open for all students returning from study or fieldwork abroad; Required of WSP seniors. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Study/field experience abroad

    Course time will be determined based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll.

    World Studies Senior Seminar
    (1.00 Credit — Advanced)

    Fall 2018
    Global Perspective

    The World Studies Senior Seminar is required for World Studies Program students.  It is open to all students who are returning from significant fieldwork and need to consider how best to convert these experiences into Plan.

    Time: TBD

    Room: Library 202

    World Studies Senior Seminar
    (1.00 Credit — Advanced)

    Spring 2019
    Global Perspective

    The World Studies Senior Seminar is required for World Studies Program students but is open to all students who are returning from significant fieldwork and need to consider how best to convert these experiences into Plan. Time: TBD Room: Library 202.

    For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

    East-West Thinking
    Elementary Spanish I
    Elementary Spanish II
    EVERYDAY LIFE IN LATIN AMERICA
    Intermediate Spanish I
    Intermediate Spanish II
    PLAN SEMINAR: READING AND WRITING CULTURE
    The Making of the Contemporary World
    The Soviet Era Through Film and Memoir
    TRAVELERS AND TOURISM

    Writing

    Fiction Workshop
    (2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Fall 2016

    Offered every fall, this class is devoted to student writing of original work in various literary genres. Most commonly, students are writing short stories or literary non-fiction, but occasionally someone may be working on a novel, week to week. Members of the class read each other's submissions extremely closely and offer critiques and suggestions during our weekly classes. The class may include exercises geared towards improving your attention to such things as character, plot, rising and falling action, voice, tone, angle of vision, and point of view. Students are expected to produce new work for class steadily and to participate in class discussions. Admission to the class is on the basis of manuscripts. May be repeated for credit. Variable credits, 2-5.

    • Permission of Instructor

    Forms of Poetry
    (3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2017

    An introduction to poetic form, for those who wish to develop their own skills in formal verse. Those in the class will attempt poems in a variety of forms. We will explore various principles of rhythm in organizing lines -- meter, syllable count, rhyme, free verse, refrains, prose -- and a broad range of traditional and not-so-traditional stanza structures -- sonnets, sestinas, villanelles, haiku, double-dactyls, nonce forms, and so on. The aim is not to complete polished poems, but to engage technical matters in poetry seriously through exercises and analysis. May be taken in conjunction with Poetry Workshop or independently. Prerequisite: None

    Poetry Workshop
    (2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Spring 2017

    Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Admission to the class is limited and is on the basis of manuscripts. Variable credit, 2-5, depending on the amount of work submitted.

    • Permission of the instructor, based on submitted manuscripts

    Writing and the Teaching of Writing
    (3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

    Spring 2017

    What do we do when we write, and how do we learn to do it? This is the question that will drive our inquiry into both the theory and the practice of teaching writing, and we will conduct that inquiry with an eye toward learning something not only about the teaching of writing, but also about our own writing processes. During the first third of the course, we'll read and discuss various writing "bibles," beginning (of course) with Strunk and White, and moving to some more radical statements about writing. In the second third of the course you will teach each other how to write: as a class we will design an assignment, and teach that assignment to each other. In the final third of the course, we will apply what we've learned to a different kind of writing teaching: peer tutoring. The course will involve tutoring on several levels; we'll spend a good deal of time in the latter half of the course working with each other's papers, and with those of other Marlboro students. This is not a writing seminar, so if you haven't yet passed the writing requirement, this shouldn't be the only writing course you take this semester. All participants in this course should be enrolled in at least one other course that requires frequent writing, since we will use your own writing as a basis for many of our in-class exercises. This course is a prerequisite for tutoring at Marlboro. Prerequisite: Must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement 

    Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2018
    Writing Seminar

    Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118 per 100,00, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The U.S. currently imprisons almost 800 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is currently serving time in jail or prison. Nearly half of the resulting U.S. prison population -- which now numbers almost 2.5 million -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. And according to a United Nations study, in all the prisons in the world outside the U.S., there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences. In U.S. prisons today there are more than 2,000. In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and criminal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the criminal justice system itself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment? As in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essay
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2018
    Writing Seminar

    Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short lengths of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life--a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He [they] must know--that is the first essential--how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Under the Influence" to Susan Orlean's "The American Man, Age 10" to Annie Dillard's "Sight and Insight" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists--in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing--look closely at everyday objects, practices, and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 5 page papers and one 8-10 page documented essay. Peer response workshops, writing conferences and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None

    For Writing offerings, also see:

    General Biology I
    Introduction to Literary Genres: Spain, Latin America, Equatorial Guinea
    Survey of Latin American Literature II

    Writing Seminars

    Captivity and Freedom
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2011
    Writing Seminar

    Have you ever found yourself drawn into a story of abduction and the return of the victim to society? The captivity narrative is a surprisingly flexible, durable, and popular genre. At their core, these are gripping stories of survival that also challenge and create our culture and identity. Traditionally thought of as nonfictional accounts of the capture of a white person by Native Americans on the frontier, ending with their redemption, this class will examine many ways to write about and on captivity. The possibility and threat of border-crossing is central to these stories, and issues of race and gender are always present. Several early American captivity narratives will be read, but we will also examine more recent captivity narratives that center on alien abduction, a POW story, and more.

    Tell it Slant: Varieties of Nonfiction Writing
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2013
    Writing Seminar

    Most writing is nonfiction. "Academic essays" aside, the category covers a huge range of genres: personal essays, memoirs, journalism, "new" journalism, reporting, nonfiction novels. . . the list could go on. In this course, we will both read and write in a variety of nonfiction modes: we'll read essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Marilynne Robinson and James Baldwin, short and long journalistic pieces by Hunter Thompson, Malcolm Gladwell and others, and books by Terry Tempest Williams and Truman Capote. And along the way, we'll write -- essays, character studies, journalistic pieces and longer analyses. The goal, everywhere, will be to do what all nonfiction writers do: to tell the truth, to tell it deeply, and to be interesting about it.

    This is a writing seminar, so expect a lot of reading and a lot of writing. Work with texts will alternate with work on revision, clarity and style. A good time will be had by all. Prerequisite: None

    Writing Seminar: West of Everything
    (4.00 Credits — )

    Spring 2013
    Writing Seminar

    At the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner announced that the western "frontier" was now officially closed - and according to Turner, with it closed the essentially American project of reinvention that the West made possible. In this class, we will examine Turner's thesis (and some more recent responses and revisions to it) in the light of various cultural representations of the American west, including works by Owen Wister, James Welch, Wallace Stegner, Cormac McCarthy and others. Our goal will be to develop an understanding of what the west represents, both for easterners and for westerners, and to delve into the role the imagined west has played in shaping American thought and culture. And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. For syllabi and course updates, see: http://www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program/ Prerequisites: None

    Writing Seminar: Writing Across the Disciplines
    (3.00 Credits — Counselor)

    Spring 2014
    Writing Seminar

    This will be a "linked" writing course -- that is, the course will be linked to several classes taught in various areas of the curriculum, and you will draw your ideas, your primary reading and the topics for your long papers from those classes. In our seminar, we'll focus on academic writing itself. We will consider what an "argument" really is: what arguments are made of, what they're supposed to do, what they look like when other people make them, and how to make them for yourself. We'll go on to consider other aspects of academic writing -- voice, grammar, structure, and above all, how to make academic writing your own, in whatever field you write in. 

    You should expect to do a lot of reading for the class, over and above the readings for the linked course, and you should expect to do a lot of writing: we'll workshop and draft three formal papers for the linked course, but I'll also ask you to do weekly informal writing assignments and in class writing. Co-requisite: HUM1525 (Shakespeare — Geraldine), HUM920 (The Nation and its Others — Seth), NSC41 (Plant Diversity — Jenny), HUM661 (Family in U.S. History II -- Kate)

    Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2019
    Writing Seminar

     “When I was a little kid,” writes Scott McCloud, “I knew exactly what comics were. Comics were those bright colorful magazines filled with bad art, stupid stories and guys in tights.”  With these words, McCloud launches into his exploration of the art-form of comics—a form whose potential and “hidden power” we will explore in this writing seminar.   Using McCloud’s Understanding Comics as our starting point, we will examine how several contemporary graphic artists use words, pictures and narratives to tell stories of their lives. Artists/writers may include:  Art Spiegelman, David Small, Vera Brosgol, Jarrett Krosoczka, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Will Eisner.  We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to a longer documented essay.  Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts.  Prerequisite: None  

    Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Spring 2018
    Writing Seminar

    Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118 per 100,00, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The U.S. currently imprisons almost 800 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is currently serving time in jail or prison. Nearly half of the resulting U.S. prison population -- which now numbers almost 2.5 million -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. And according to a United Nations study, in all the prisons in the world outside the U.S., there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences. In U.S. prisons today there are more than 2,000. In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and criminal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the criminal justice system itself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment? As in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    Writing Seminar: Exploring the (New) New Journalism
    (4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

    Fall 2017
    Writing Seminar

    In this course we will read and do journalism, both as it is traditionally considered -- e.g., the essay as it has been defined in magazines like The New Yorker, or the expository report as practiced in The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal -- and in the many variations on traditional journalism that have emerged since the 1960s: gonzo print journalism, various forms of online writing, radio essays, etc. Our goal will be to read (and listen to, in the case of radio essays) as much interesting and provocative journalistic writing as possible, by writers like H.L. Mencken, Jonathan Raban, Hunter S. Thompson, Seymour Hersch, Annie Proulx, Jon Krakauer, Terry Tempest Williams and others. Our goal, in the end, will not be so much to arrive at a narrow definition of journalism as to expand our own writing practice to include a range of styles, voices and angles of presentation. And, as this will be a writing seminar, we will also write a lot, about the journalism we have read, and in journalistic pieces of our own. Discussion of the course texts will alternate with writing conferences, workshops, and work on grammar, style and structure.  Prerequisite:  None  Corequisite:  Can be paired with Gloria Biamonte's Graphic Journalism course

    Writing Seminar: Fear Itself: Policy, Paranoia & American Culture
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2010
    Writing Seminar

    Consider a strange discrepancy. Between 1989 and 2005, nearly every statistical measure suggested that life for the average American was unprecedentedly safe from physical threat, and getting safer: violent crime rates in almost every category declined steadily throughout the nineties and into the new millennium. Yet during the same period, polls measuring the perceived crime rate consistently showed the same thing: a persistent fear, in almost every segment of the population, that crime was on the rise. Perhaps in response to this fear and others like it, communities across the U.S. participated in the construction of the largest prison system the world has ever seen. At the same time, in response to other perceived threats - those posed by, for example, global terrorism, drugs, and illegal immigrants - American lawmakers have challenged long-held notions of civil liberty as they, and we, have restructured the physical and conceptual architecture of American life. Americans have never been more closely watched nor more thoroughly protected: and yet year after year we report feeling less safe. In this course we will examine some of the more pervasive fears in American culture and the policies and social architectures those fears have helped shape. Along the way, we will consider the war on terror and the war on drugs; we will think about the ways immigrants may have come to embody our fear of the outsider, the young our fear of the insider. We will operate largely by considering, and conceptualizing, case studies: but throughout we will ask, again and again, the same questions. What are we afraid of? Why are we afraid? And what, if anything, should we do about it? And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Expect to read a lot and to write more. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: None

    WRITING SEMINAR: Interdisciplinary Science Writing
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2014
    Writing Seminar

    How can non-specialists make sense of today's revolutionary advances in technology, mobility, food production and more? In this class, we'll examine how popular science writers translate technical information into stories that anybody can understand and find compelling. We'll look at a variety of texts that repackage scientific knowledge into accessible, jargon-free narratives, practicing our own hand along the way. Our class is centered on the goal of clear communication driven by curiosity.

    WRITING SEMINAR: Sense of Place in a Rapidly Changing World
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2014
    Writing Seminar

    This writing seminar will examine the choices that contemporary nature writers--including urban nature writers and writers of color--are making in the face of climate change and habitat destruction. Students will write their own nonfiction of place, working to understand where and how their voice fits into the surprisingly varied styles and approaches of today’s most innovative and influential nature writers. The course will feature an extended unit on rivers and writing, including at least one canoeing excursion related to course texts and assignments.

    Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essay
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2018
    Writing Seminar

    Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short lengths of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life--a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He [they] must know--that is the first essential--how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Under the Influence" to Susan Orlean's "The American Man, Age 10" to Annie Dillard's "Sight and Insight" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists--in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing--look closely at everyday objects, practices, and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 5 page papers and one 8-10 page documented essay. Peer response workshops, writing conferences and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None

    WRITING SEMINAR: WAR & RUMORS OF WAR
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2011
    Writing Seminar

    The twentieth century was the bloodiest century in history: for the first time technology made it possible for armed forces to engage in routine attacks on civilian populations, to kill indiscriminately and from a distance, to destroy entire cities from the air, to threaten the annihilation of humanity itself. Our experiences with war in the last century have set the stage for the wars we fight today; more than that, our responses to today's conflicts are predicated on ways of thinking about war, and about human conflict generally, that developed in the preceding century. In this course, we will attempt to understand the wars of the last century, and the ways of thinking they have engendered, by looking at various cultural reactions to them: these will include books like Heller's Catch-22, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, as well as films like "The Best Days of Our Lives," "Full Metal Jacket," and "Breaker Morant" and more. And of course, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops, and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: None

    Prerequisite: None.

    Writing Seminar: Ways of Telling - Reading Written & Visual Narratives
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2015
    Writing Seminar

    "The mind is its own place, the visible world is another, and visual and verbal images sustain the dialogue between them."   Wright Morris  When we think about narratives, we most often think of prose words that tell a story. But what happens when writers, novelists, memoirists, and nonfiction writers integrate images into their narratives: photographs archived in history museums, personal photographs, or evocative graphics that merge with the written text? In this writing seminar, we will investigate the elusive dialogue between words and visual images, and consider how we "read" or interpret both prose and pictures. Beginning with Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, a genre-bending autobiographical novel that explores the convergence of  memory and imagination, we will explore Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close  (a child's wild vision and wild hurt in confronting the cataclysm of  9/11), David Small's graphic memoir Stitches, Wright Morris's memoir The Home Place (a photo-text that takes us back to a single day in Wright's boyhood home in Nebraska), and Lynd Ward's Vertigo (a wordless novel of the Great Depression in woodcut prints). We will consider the point at which images enter the texts and examine how they act to undercut, reinforce, and/or expand the written narrative. Through lots of practice in writing, critiquing, and rewriting, we will work toward two of our main goals, to help you find a writing process that works well for you and to allow you to experience the value of language as a tool for thinking deeply and clearly. Prerequisite: None

    Writing Seminar: Writing like a Mountain
    (4.00 Credits — Introductory)

    Fall 2013
    Writing Seminar

    This writing seminar will climb mountains. Throughout the semester, we'll hike through a range of texts that explore what the significance of mountains is to writers from many different traditions. Authors that may be on the reading list include Gary Snyder, Petrarch, Dogen, and Miriam Underhill. We'll write analytically about these texts and creatively about the actual mountains we live amid. Finally, we'll foray to some mountains. Did you know Henry David Thoreau climbed Mt. Wantastiquet while visiting Brattleboro? Have you read fire lookout tower poetry while in a tower? We'll make at least one group ascent of a mountain, adding our voices and footsteps to the peaks.

    Detours

    (a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)