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Courses

Get a feel for the exciting variety of courses taught at Marlboro.

This is a list of courses that faculty felt was representational of the courses offered. It is not a complete list of courses, some courses are offered yearly, while others are infrequent. A course may be inspired by events or strong interests and taught only once.

Most advanced work is in the form of tutorials on specific subjects, a collaboration between one faculty member and one student or a handful of students.

Dance

Anatomy of Movement
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2015

An introduction to human anatomy with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanical principles of movement. Concepts will be explored through a combination of scientific study, experiential anatomy, and dance movement. Prerequisite: None

Argentine Tango
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2017

Join us in an introduction to Argentine Tango - a popular social dance of improvisation in a close partnership. We will be dancing to both traditional and contemporary music. We (Jim & Sara) are part of the Brattleboro and Western Mass tango communities and so there also will be opportunities to dance off campus. Check out http://youtu.be/qqL911qU3VE for a taste.  May be repeated for credit.

Additional Fee:$0

Ballet
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2014

This multi-level ballet course will review for students the basic concepts required for the proper execution of ballet technique, including alignment, turnout, articulation of the knees and feet, and port de bras.  Basic ballet vocabulary and movement phrases will be reviewed and taught and the expectations and traditions specific to the progression of a ballet class will be followed.  Students who come into the class with a more advanced understanding of ballet technique will be given opportunities for and access to more advanced content within the class.  The class will promote strength and flexibility for the overall dancer while respecting each student's unique physical capacities within the demands of classical technique.

BEGINNING MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2012

How can your body move efficiently and powerfully through space?   What pathways of movement work with the skeletal structure of the body to create an easeful flow? How does becoming more aware of bodily sensations change your ability to control your own movement?   In this beginning modern dance course, we will spend our time learning by moving.  You will develop a basic vocabulary of movement principles that are used in contemporary dance performance and work on the ability to learn physically --  improving physical coordination, strength,flexibility, balance, and body awareness.   Supporting our study of movement techniques will be some personal movement exploration (through improvisation and choreography) and occasional readings or video viewings to contextualize our dancing. Prerequisite: None

CHOREOGRAPHING FOR GROUPS
(3.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2010

Students in this course will learn strategies for creating group choreographies and will direct groups of their peers in weekly projects. Course material will include both rehearsal strategies and compositional techniques for working with groups. The companion course, Performance Workshop, will provide student performers for the projects required by this class. Prerequisite: one semester of choreography class or permission of instructor

Choreography
(3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019

In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances, drawing on the dance traditions they have studied and gaining new tools and inspirations. Students will be encouraged to think deeply about what is valued in the dance forms they practice and what their own goals are as choreographers. We will work together to develop language to describe dances, so that we can sharpen our ability to observe and analyze choreographic choices and expand our own palettes as creators. Responding to weekly assignments and prompts, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and on exploring both tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, how to support others in reaching their own choreographic visions, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of established artists in a variety of forms through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester.   

  • Permission of the instructor

Choreography and Music
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2012

In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances. Responding to specific assignments, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and when appropriate, on exploring tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of other artists through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester. The special topic for this semester is Music and its relationship to Choreography. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Contact Improvisation
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying and find access to our own strength and sensitivity. Prerequisite: None

Dance & Gender
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2016

Exploring the ways in which gender is represented, constructed, and questioned through dance and the body.

Dance As Social Action
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020

This course examines the intersection of dance and social/political activism. How can dance participate in addressing social issues? How has it done so in the past? When does dance actually spark social change? We will examine dances that bring communities together for change, dances that address social and political themes on stage, dances that protest in the street, dance companies that challenge the politics of who gets to dance, and more. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include guest artists, creative work, fieldtrips, and a research paper.

Dance in World Cultures
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2019
Global Perspective

In this course, we will explore what dance means in a variety of cultures around the world and address the complexities inherent in studying dance forms from outside our own cultural traditions. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include a number of studio master classes with guest artists.

Dance Plan Performance Tutorial
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Spring 2010

Particpation in a senior Plan dance performance.

Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance Technique
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2015

In this course, we will develop expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of principles of contemporary release-based technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, initiating movement clearly, and maintaining a continuous sense of flow. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. This course combines intermediate and advanced level study, with students at the two levels assisting each other in learning. Prerequisite: Previous dance experience and permission of the instructor

PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2010

Dancers of all levels and styles are encouraged to sign up for this workshop to participate as performer in projects choreographed by their peers. Students who register for this course commit to being present for a set schedule of rehearsals and to performing in student projects throughout the semester. This workshop is the companion course to Choreographing for Groups.

REPERTORY
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2011

Students will participate in the creation of a new choreographic work directed by faculty member, Kristin Horrigan. The choreography will be performed at the end of the fall semester. The working title for this year’s repertory piece is "How big are YOUR feet?"

In this class, we will use choreographic process as a lens for examining the concept of carbon footprints and our own individual participation in the production of greenhouse gases. Through our research, we will explore the physicality inherent in the human aspects of this issue – our motivations, our actions, our relationships with the bigger picture. Out of our process together we will produce one or more performance pieces inspired by what we’ve learned and the questions we are asking. This artistic process will be directed by the instructor, however dancers will have an active role in creating material, imagining the direction of the work, and resolving the issues raised by engaging such a complex topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 

Senegalese Dance
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2018
Global Perspective

A movement course introducing African dance forms.

Detours

(a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)