Academics Navigation

Courses

Get a feel for the exciting variety of courses taught at Marlboro.

Generally speaking, each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned. Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required. Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

American Studies

Growing Old in America
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Kathryn Ratcliff
HUM2361
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This course offers a multi-disciplinary investigation of aging as a social, historical and personal process. What does it mean to grow old in a culture that celebrates youth and independence? How have the values and practices associated with aging changed over time? How do social policies and social institutions define and shape old age? How can the experiences of different elderly populations bring to light inequalities of race, ethnicity, class and gender and how does ageism intersect with other forms of oppression?  How have particular individuals navigated the complexities and challenges of aging? In exploring these questions, the course opens up central issues and methods in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and offers an opportunity to integrate theory and practice.  All students will spend two to three hours per week working with a local organization that provides care for older adults. Students will also learn and apply methods of oral history.  The class will meet on Wednesdays, with only an occasional Friday meeting.  The schedule is designed to create time and space for community engagement. In a society that will age rapidly over the next three decades, critically informed engagement with aging is vital for students anticipating work in the social service and health fields, family members who will care for aging parents and grandparents, and citizens who will be called on to consider the needs of an aging population. Wherever we are in the life course, the topic of aging invites us to consider fundamental questions of what we value and how we care for one another.

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Dalrymple/D43

For American Studies offerings, also see:

Popular Music and Its Discontents
Writing Seminar: The Cultural Politics of Disney

Anthropology

Conversations with Elders: Who has Permission to Produce Theory?
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Nelli Sargsyan
SSC711
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Global Perspective

What might we see and understand differently if we trace the intellectual history of a discipline critiqued for its entanglements with colonialism and androcentrism from a different angle, off center or from the fringes?  What might come into focus in this exercise?  How can this shift in perspective and focus allow us to rethink our own processes of knowledge production?  Grounded in anthropology, the key figures - our elders - through whose works we will weave the intellectual history of the discipline will be indigenous scholars, scholars of color, or scholars who, despite their valuable contributions have not been granted central position in the "anthropological canon."  To expand our sociopolitical consciousness we will locate these scholars in relation not only to the conditions of disciplinary knowledge production of their time but also in relation to the larger political and cultural currents to which they have been responding.  While centering anthropology, this course will benefit any student interested in social theory as we will engage scholars whose thinking is crucial to understanding different power relations shaping the production of theory and subsequently a worldview.  By engaging with our elders we will be better able to cultivate anticolonial and anti-racist scholarly practices.

  • Previous work in social sciences
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Decolonizing Anthropology (2010), 3rd editionHarrison978-0913167830$18.00
Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" (2018)Hurston978-0062748201$17.28
Speaking of Indians (2018)Deloria978-0803266148$13.18

For Anthropology offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: The Joy of Weaving Relations

Art History

Introduction to the History of Art Part I: The Pre-Modern World
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Felicity Ratte
HUM2336
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This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of art history and to the curriculum as it is taught at Marlboro College. We will begin with the skills that art historians use, critical visual analysis (which includes historical analysis), critical reading and critical writing. Students will develop these skills through a variety of exercises, including museum visits, in-class presentations and written assignments. As the class progresses we will study the history of architecture and urban design, painting and sculpture through the multiple lenses of patronage, ritual practice, state control and social experience, among others. The art and architectural works covered in the class date from pre-history to the fourteenth century and the geographic range includes the Mediterranean, Europe, Southeast Asia and the Middle East.

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

Making Meaning Out of Stone: Built Environment & Ritual Practice in Florence & Cairo c.1300
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Felicity Ratte
HUM1460
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Cities have always been sites of protest, transformation, dream making and dream dashing, triumph, celebration and disaster. Human activity, building practices and civic authority all play a role in the creation and production of both the stage and the “play” of city life. This course undertakes to examine two world historical cities, Florence and Cairo in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Both were key cities of the Mediterranean world at this time, experiencing remarkable growth in their architectural fabric, their world renown and their earthly riches. The aim of the course is to probe, through an examination of primary documents and the built environment, what lived experience in these two cities was like.

  • Permission of instructor
  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cairo Histories of a CityAl-Sayyad978-0674072459$21.00

For Art History offerings, also see:

Contemporary Art Seminar
Series, Sequence and the Photobook

Asian Studies

Brush, Sword, and Hoe: Ancient Chinese History & Culture
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Seth Harter
HUM1052
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Global Perspective

This course will examine the development of Chinese culture from the earliest divination rites to the court intrigues of the Ming dynasty. Along the way we will study the creation and growth of the imperial institution and meritocratic civil service that made it work; we will discuss China’s complex relations with its central Asian neighbors; we will consider some of the fabulous economic and technological developments that made Chinese products the envy of the world in the 17th century; and we will read a selection of poetry and prose by Tang hermits, Song officials, and Ming aesthetes.

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D21
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D21
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
The Open Empire: A History of China to 1800, 2nd EditionHansen9780393938777$66.75
Monkey: Folk Novelof China by Wu Ch'eng-enWaley9780802130860$17.00
Mountain Home: The Wilderness Poetry of Ancient ChinaHinton9781811216241$15.00
1587, A Year of No Significance: The Ming Dynasty iin DeclineHuang9780300028843$24.30

For Asian Studies offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft

Biochemistry

Biochemistry of the Cell
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Todd Smith
NSC13
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Biochemists used to debate the nature of proteins: their composition, structure and function. Now we know many extraordinary details of the shapes of proteins and how they function. For example, how they help our bodies acquire nutrients from food, and use those nutrients for fuel and carry oxygen to our tissues. In particular, researchers have revealed the intricacies of how a protein’s structure is related to its function. In this course we will employ an evolutionary perspective as we discuss major topics such as amino acids, proteins and protein structure, bioenergetics, enzymes and enzyme function. We will also study major metabolic pathways and their key control points. Our goals are for you to develop a thorough understanding of how enzymes work and to be familiar with key metabolic pathways and how they are controlled. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I & II; Co-requisite: Laboratory in Biochemistry of the Cell

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
BiochemistryBerg, et al.9781464126109$80.00

Biochemistry of the Cell Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Todd Smith
NSC425
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This laboratory will be an introduction to techniques commonly used by biochemists, and must be taken in conjunction with Biochemistry of the Cell. Your work in the laboratory will focus on a semester-long investigation of an enzyme. This project will allow you to perform your own biochemistry research project in which you will employ the principles of chemistry and biochemistry that we study in the classroom. The protein you will investigate is already well-characterized. That is, previous research has described in detail the properties of the enzyme. Your goal is to determine if the enzyme you isolate is the same as that described in the primary literature. To answer this question we will begin with basic laboratory procedures such as preparing reagents, chromatography and performing a protein assay. We will then explore techniques for studying the activity of enzymes, and methods for separating proteins, such as one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Finally we will employ immunochemical methods for the identification of proteins. Throughout this semester-long project you will also learn about the procedures for data acquisition and analysis that will allow you to draw meaningful conclusions from your results. 

  • Organic Chemistry 1 & 11
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

Biology

Anatomy of Movement
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
CDS564
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An introduction to human anatomy with emphasis on the musculoskeletal system and biomechanical principles of movement. Concepts will be explored through a combination of scientific study, experiential anatomy, and dance movement.

  • Wednesday 6:00pm-8:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
  • Friday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Trailguide to the BodyBiel9780982663400$53.99

General Biology I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
NSC9
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General Biology I is an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. We begin the semester with an examination of the molecular, cellular, and metabolic nature of living organisms and then explore the genetic basis of life. General Biology I & II serve as the foundation for further work in life sciences. 

  • some chemistry beneficial
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biological Science 5th editionFreeman, Quillan100321743679$120.00

General Biology I Lab
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Allison Turner
NSC174
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The focus of this course is an exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. We will study such organisms as bacteria, yeast, molds, and mammalian cell cultures including cancer cells, plants, bacteria and others, and spend time in the Ecological Reserve. Skill in basic laboratory techniques in biology will be acquired throughout the semester. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students.

  • Concurrent enrollment in General Biology I or permission of instructor
  • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 220

General Ecology
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Jaime Tanner
NSC140
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An examination of several major factors which contribute to the distribution and abundance of organisms and, hence, to the structure of biotic communities. An emphasis will be placed on the original literature. This course should be taken by all students with a life-science orientation in the environmental sciences.

  • College-level biology
  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ecology: Concepts & ApplicationsMolles77837282$51.00

General Ecology Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Jaime Tanner
NSC402
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In this lab we will take a hands-on approach to learning important concepts discussed in the General Ecology class. You will be introduced to the methods that ecologists use to design, carry out and analyze research. The scheduled day is tentative and may change once students are enrolled. 

  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 220

Plants of Vermont
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
NSC157
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A study of the taxonomic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships of the dominant vascular plant families of Vermont. How do we identify flowering plants and how do they interact with other plants and animals such as pollinators and seed dispersers?  Fieldwork, including several fieldtrips to local areas of botanical interest, will take place during a Friday 1:30-4:50 lab in the first half of the semester. 

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wildflowers of New EnglandElliman, New England Wildflower Society101604694645$20.00
Guide to Flowering Plant FamiliesZomlefer100807844705$40.00

Ceramics

Introduction to Ceramics
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
ART2644
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Global Perspective

In this class, students will be encouraged to develop their relationship to clay as an expressive medium, and also their personal voice with the material.  The class is designed to affirm the need for hands-on, direct manipulation of the material towards expressive ends.  Students are introduced to a range of concepts, techniques, and equipment, all within the context of historical and current art practice.  Craftsmanship, process, concept, and final product are emphasized equally while we study both vessel traditions and sculptural possibilities in clay.

Additional Fee:$120

  • Tuesday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
  • Friday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

Topics In Ceramics
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
ART2692
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This course is offered to provide small group and individualized instruction in ceramics for a range of skill levels, and welcomes participants from all of the communities connected to Marlboro College.  We will meet once a week to hone existing skills and to introduce new ways of working with clay, all in an effort to develop and broaden each student's vocabulary with the medium.  Instruction will focus on hand-building techniques for students beginning with clay, and wheel-throwing techniques for those students entering the class with previous experience.  Also included will be image-based lectures that will highlight contemporary ceramic artists, and the methods they employ to convey particular meaning in their work.

Additional Fee:$120

For Ceramics offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft

Chemistry

General Chemistry I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Todd Smith
NSC158
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Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting, and include topics such as creating more efficient solar collectors and the reactions of natural and human-made chemicals in the environment. We will explore these topics as we learn about atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds, molecular structure and other concepts central to modern chemistry. Many of these topics are related to current health topics and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH include research on ocean acidification, and our exploration of thermochemistry includes calculations of the fuel value of traditional and alternative fuels.

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Principles of General ChemistrySilberberg9780073402697$20.00

General Chemistry I Lab
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Allison Turner
NSC444
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Science is a process, not a collection of facts. In this laboratory we will combine the study of chemistry with the process of science. Our explorations will focus on "pharmacognosy" which is the scientific study of medicinal plants. We will begin by developing some basic quantitative skills and familiarity with laboratory techniques. The activities for these early parts of the lab will be fairly structured. As you develop your ability to approach a problem scientifically the activities will be less structured. You will have more responsibility for designing and conducting your own experiments on medicinal herbs. Students will work on projects in groups but each student will keep their own laboratory notebook and write their own laboratory reports.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

For Chemistry offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cooking

Classics

Intermediate Greek
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Henner Petin
HUM2563
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This course is for those who have passed an the introductory course in classical Greek and want to pursue the language further. By the end of the semester, this course wants to enable students to read some unadapted passages from a variety of Greek authors, both in prose and poetry. This will be a highly rewarding experience for those interested in literature and languages more broadly and will help enormously with the study of ancient history, literature and philosophy. A written exam at the end of the semester will ensure good knowledge of grammar and a broad range of vocabulary.

  • Introductory Greek / Greek IA
  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Intermediate Latin
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Henner Petin
HUM2562
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This course is for those who have completed the introductory course in Latin and want to pursue the language further. By the end of the semester, this course wants to enable students to read some unadapted passages from a variety of Latin authors, both in prose and poetry. This will be a highly rewarding experience for those interested in literature and languages more broadly and will help enormously with the study of ancient history, literature and philosophy. A written exam at the end of the semester will ensure good knowledge of grammar and a broad range of vocabulary.

  • Introductory Latin / Latin IA
  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Introductory Greek
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Henner Petin
HUM2561
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This course is for any students interested in making a first start on the classical Greek language. By the end of the semester, the course wants to enable students to read, in adaptation, some key passages from the classics of Greek literature. The first steps in learning an ancient language are always enormously rewarding, because along with their language, we also gain some fascinating insights into the way in which a now-lost civilisation thought and lived. There will be a written exam at the end of the semester to ensure good knowledge of basic grammar and some vocabulary.

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Athenize: Introduction to Ancient Greek, Book 1Balme and Lawall9780190607661$50.00

Introductory Latin
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Henner Petin
HUM2560
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This course is for any students interested in making a first start on the Latin language. By the end of the semester, the course wants to enable students to read, in adaptation, some key passages from the classics of Latin literature. The first steps in learning an ancient language are always enormously rewarding, because along with their language, we also gain some fascinating insights into the way in which a now-lost civilisation thought and lived.There will be a written exam at the end of the semester to ensure good knowledge of basic grammar and some vocabulary.

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin (7th ed.)Wheelock and LaFleur9780061997228$25.00

Mapping Myth and its Afterlife
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Henner Petin
HUM2564
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Few aspects of antiquity continue to have an afterlife as impactful as the worlds of Greek and Roman mythology. Stories of gods and men, of heroes and their adventures continue to dominate the popular perception of the ancient world. What, however, do these myths say about the cultures in which they rose to importance and - more pressingly - how have they influenced people's thinking ever since, including our own?  Investigating such questions about myth is the aim of this course. Putting a particular focus on two areas, love and politics, students will learn how to explore myth and our own relationship to it through a range of approaches - such as structuralist theory and cultural comparisons - in order to develop their own ideas about this fascinating body of material. During the semester, students will write two graded papers on topics of their own choosing. Bringing in material from beyond the texts and images discussed in class is strongly encouraged. Any knowledge of Latin and/or classical Greek (or indeed another ancient or modern language) is of course very useful, but not a requirement. 

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Computer Science

Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Matthew Ollis and Jim Mahoney
NSC543
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A mathematical introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include automata such as Turing machines, formal languages such as context-free grammars, and computability questions as described by "NP-complete" problems and Godel's incompleteness theorem. This is an upper level course that presents the foundations of theoretical computer science. Expect practice with lots of mathematical proofs, with programming examples to build intuition.

  • Programming experience and some prior work in formal math
  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Introduction to the Theory of ComputationSipser1133187811$36.95

Introduction to Programming with Python
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Jim Mahoney
NSC552
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A first class in computer programming, and as such a foundation class for further work in computer science. Much as a competency with English grammar is required for writing, an understanding of programming is required for nearly all intermediate and advanced work in computer science. A similar course is offered every fall, though the language chosen varies from year to year. Python is a modern, elegant, high level scripting language, popular at Google among other places. In addition to learning about "object oriented programming", loops, input/output and all that, expect to also learn a variety of computer skills and basics.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Python Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science, 3rd editionZelle1590282752$63.39

Cultural History

For Cultural History offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Erasure and Voice
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Identity, Place, Belonging
I don't believe in God, but I miss Him: Spiritual Longings in a Secular Age
Mothers of the Word/World: Latin American Women Poets
Popular Music and Its Discontents
Women Between Worlds: Interpreters, Guides, and Survivors

Dance

Choreography
(3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Kristin Horrigan
ART2343
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In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances, drawing on the dance traditions they have studied and gaining new tools and inspirations. Students will be encouraged to think deeply about what is valued in the dance forms they practice and what their own goals are as choreographers. We will work together to develop language to describe dances, so that we can sharpen our ability to observe and analyze choreographic choices and expand our own palettes as creators. Responding to weekly assignments and prompts, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and on exploring both tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, how to support others in reaching their own choreographic visions, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of established artists in a variety of forms through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester.   

  • Permission of the instructor
  • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
  • Friday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

The Body As Material and Metaphor
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
ART2646
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This studio course will explore the contents, possibilities, and meanings of our bodies through physical practices and performance making. We will use experiential methods and performance experiments to question and articulate the anatomical, material, psychological, cultural, and all together mysterious nature of bodies. Students will be exposed to training and compositional methods from contemporary dance, dance-theater, physical theater, and other disciplines. This class is appropriate for experienced and novice dancers, actors, circus artists, athletes, writers, and any-body with a hunger to ask questions through physical performance. Every class will include physical training practices as well as compositional crafting. The class will result in a final performance open to the public.

  • Monday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
  • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

For Dance offerings, also see:

Anatomy of Movement

Economics

For Economics offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Why We Misbehave

Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies Colloquium
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
CDS593
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Global Perspective

The Environmental Studies (ES) Colloquium serves to foster community among Environmental Studies students and faculty at Marlboro as well to introduce new students to ES opportunities at the college. This year, the Colloquium will employ the broad theme of 'Climate Change' to explore the rich and varied ES approaches to understanding the cultural, scientific and political dimensions of our environmental challenges. Faculty at Marlboro embody this variety of perspectives, as we will learn through conversations with faculty who will visit the class. Students will gain an understanding of environmental issues in the Central Connecticut River Valley bioregion and its connections to the larger world through field trips and encounters with organizations and individuals who envision more just and sustainable ways of living. Throughout the course we will deepen our connections to place and to each other through readings, discussions, experiential learning and a weekend outdoor adventure.

  • Wednesday 5:30pm-7:00pm in Dining Hall/staples

Outdoor Technical Skills
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Nikolas Katrick
CDS629
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Deconstructing a campstove.  Loading a frame pack. Tying knots.  These skills are the technical glue that hold trips and expeditions together, yet we often learn them as an aside to formal outdoor trainings and leadership seminars.  This class will focus on the technical skills that enable outdoor leaders to logistically manage their activities, and in turn, teach them to others. This is primarily a hands-on course with a small reflective piece, and we will have one overnight trip near the end of the course to practice these skills as a whole. This course is a natural extension of Outdoor Leadership. Strongly recommended for, but not exclusive to, outdoor-focused leaders.

  • Wednesday 3:30pm-5:50pm in The OP/OP

For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: The Joy of Weaving Relations
General Biology I
Re-Imagining the Human: Colonial Remains within Climate Futures
Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cooking

Film/Video Studies

"...at least they'll see the black." A Survey of Black American Film
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Brad Heck
ART2658
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With the popularity of films such as Black Panther, Selma and Moonlight;  with a focus on diversity and representation in Hollywood with movements like #Time'sUp or #OscarsSo White, black artistry within American film has become a central focus on the national cultural stage.  This course will be a survey of Black film from the early 20th century to today.  We'll be looking at themes of identity, gender, representation, family, narrative, etc...in the hopes of providing a clear understanding of the ever growing influence of Black film inside and outside the Hollywood system.  Directors will include Julie Dash, Spike Lee, Charles Burnett, William Greaves and Oscar Micheaux.  This is a student-taught course with Eric Wefald.

  • Monday 6:15pm-9:00pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art

Intermediate & Advanced Film / Video Plan Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Brad Heck
ART2648
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This course is designed for intermediate and advanced level students in the visual arts. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works-in-progress. Students at the intermediate level will be given three-week-long project prompts and technical demonstrations. Those on or about to be on Plan will select one body of work to focus on throughout the course. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not directly related to film/video studies, but is intended to relate to their film/video work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of a body of work and Plan Projects. 

Additional Fee:$ 120

  • An introductory video production course at the college level or by permission of instructor.
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art

The Six Principal Modes of Documentary Film
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Brad Heck
ART2449
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Described as “the most significant documentary scholar in the world,” Bill Nichols identified six modes of representation that function something like sub-genres of documentary film: poetic, expository, participatory, observational, reflexive and performative. By viewing and discussing films such as Sans Soleil, Chuck Norris vs. Communism, The Gleaners and I, Salesman, Waltz With Bashir, Stories We Tell,Tongues Untied, and The Act of Killing this course will investigate all six modes and through the study of each explore the history, social impact and ethics of documentary filmmaking. Coursework will include weekly screenings, written responses to and analyses of the films and in class discussion. We will be reading Introduction to Documentary, Third Edition by Bill Nichols (ISBN 978-0253026859). Please purchase a copy of this book before classes begin. A course fee of $15 is included to help offset the cost of some of the documentary films. If for any reason this cost is prohibitive please contact Brad.  

Additional Fee: $15

  • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Introduction to Documentary, Third EditionNichols9780253026859$25.00

First Year Seminars

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Erasure and Voice
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Rituparna Mitra
HUM2532
View
Global Perspective

Situating itself in postcolonial, transnational, and subnational spaces, this course will use poetry, cultural history, testimony, fiction, along with scholarly readings, to reflect on critical and creative acts of listening and speaking. Topics of focus will include the racialized and gendered politics of representation, historical silences, contested speech acts, trauma and testimony, listening across boundaries (spatial, cultural, sexual, species), and the significance of multiple voices versus an official one. Our poetry readings will include excerpts from NourbeSe Philip’s Zong!, Solmaz Sharif’s Look, and Danez Smith’s Don’t Call us Dead. Testimonies will include excerpts from Survival in Auschwitz and I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala. In terms of literary fiction, we will read Sophocles’ Antigone and Kamila Shamsie’s rewriting of it in Home Fire, China Miéville’s The City and the City, among others. Thinkers on the topic we may encounter include Assia Djebar, Judith Butler, and Chimamanda Adichie.

Marlboro College’s First Year Seminars (FYS) are designed around different approaches to an underlying theme and draw on interdisciplinary and creative methods. This year’s theme is “Ways of Knowing.” This seminar introduces students to the Marlboro Promise through an exploration of a topic about which your instructor is passionate. These courses allow students to participate actively in their own learning and to begin to acquire the clear writing and speaking skills necessary for independent, intellectual achievement throughout college and beyond. The FYS offers ample opportunities for collaborative work with peers while specifically created co-curricular events open up access to wider on-campus and outside resources. Apart from learning how a college course works, building connections with faculty, staff, and other first-year students, and honing the critical and creative thinking skills essential to flourishing in college, these seminars help develop leadership and project management skills by guiding students through the inception, progression, and completion of shorter and longer assignments.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Look: PoemsSharif9781555977443$8.78
Home FireShamsie9780735217683$14.46
The City & the CityMiville9780345497529$17.00
I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in GuatemalaMenchu, Wright9781844674183$11.50

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Identity, Place, Belonging
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Brenda Foley
HUM2530
View

From a multi-disciplinary perspective that includes disability, race, gender, and performance, students in this first-year seminar will explore how narratives of self, identity, and difference shape our sense of place and belonging. Texts in the class will include the films The Station Agent, Black Panther, and The Shape of Water and books such as So You Want to Talk About Race, The Lives They Left Behind, and All the Women in My Family Sing. Assignments will include written responses, short essays, and a creative final project.

Marlboro College’s First Year Seminars (FYS) are designed around different approaches to an underlying theme and draw on interdisciplinary and creative methods. This year’s theme is “Ways of Knowing.” This seminar introduces students to the Marlboro Promise through an exploration of a topic about which your instructor is passionate. These courses allow students to participate actively in their own learning and to begin to acquire the clear writing and speaking skills necessary for independent, intellectual achievement throughout college and beyond. The FYS offers ample opportunities for collaborative work with peers while specifically created co-curricular events open up access to wider on-campus and outside resources. Apart from learning how a college course works, building connections with faculty, staff, and other first-year students, and honing the critical and creative thinking skills essential to flourishing in college, these seminars help develop leadership and project management skills by guiding students through the inception, progression, and completion of shorter and longer assignments.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
All the Women in my Family SingSantana997296216$10.98
So You Want to Talk About RaceOluo1580056776$20.76
The Lives They Left BehindPenney1934137146$72.40

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Mapping the Knower and the Known
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Amer Latif
HUM2534
View

What are the consequences of having to distrust the very senses that we must rely on? Whether it’s the Buddha, 2500 years ago, telling us that there is no self or a contemporary neuroscientist telling us that our sense of self is a hallucination, they are both asking us to go against our experience. Or, to take a simpler example, the sun clearly goes around the earth and yet we also know from physics that it is the earth that circles the sun. What might be a coherent way of living with this paradoxical situation where two diametrically opposed perspectives are equally true? These questions will serve as points of entry for our exploration of contemporary and premodern maps of knowledge. We will pay special attention to understanding the tension between rational/scientific and conventional ways of knowing.  Readings from cognitive science, social psychology, philosophy, and religion will inform our conversations.

Marlboro College’s First Year Seminars (FYS) are designed around different approaches to an underlying theme and draw on interdisciplinary and creative methods. This year’s theme is “Ways of Knowing.” This seminar introduces students to the Marlboro Promise through an exploration of a topic about which your instructor is passionate. These courses allow students to participate actively in their own learning and to begin to acquire the clear writing and speaking skills necessary for independent, intellectual achievement throughout college and beyond. The FYS offers ample opportunities for collaborative work with peers while specifically created co-curricular events open up access to wider on-campus and outside resources. Apart from learning how a college course works, building connections with faculty, staff, and other first-year students, and honing the critical and creative thinking skills essential to flourishing in college, these seminars help develop leadership and project management skills by guiding students through the inception, progression, and completion of shorter and longer assignments.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mistakes were made (but not by me): why we justify foolish beliefs, bad decisions, and hurtful actsTavris & Aronson9780544574786$44.70
A Guide For the PerplexedSchumacher9780062414816$13.27
First You Write a Sentence: The Elements of Reading, Writingand LifeMoran9780143134343$16.58

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: The Joy of Weaving Relations
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Nelli Sargsyan
SSC713
View
Global Perspective

How can we come to know ourselves and our relations to others in the Anthropocene – the most recent geologic time period during which human activity has had an altering impact on earth system processes? How and where can we find joy within us and with others in these times of increasing climate crises? These are some of the questions we will examine in this First Year Seminar. Grounded in anthropology and stretching to different modes of knowing, we will move away from human exceptionalism to explore ways of becoming human with other species and flourishing in the aftermath of ecological disaster, as we seek biocultural hope and joy.

Marlboro College’s First Year Seminars (FYS) are designed around different approaches to an underlying theme and draw on interdisciplinary and creative methods. This year’s theme is “Ways of Knowing.” This seminar introduces students to the Marlboro Promise through an exploration of a topic about which your instructor is passionate. These courses allow students to participate actively in their own learning and to begin to acquire the clear writing and speaking skills necessary for independent, intellectual achievement throughout college and beyond. The FYS offers ample opportunities for collaborative work with peers while specifically created co-curricular events open up access to wider on-campus and outside resources. Apart from learning how a college course works, building connections with faculty, staff, and other first-year students, and honing the critical and creative thinking skills essential to flourishing in college, these seminars help develop leadership and project management skills by guiding students through the inception, progression, and completion of shorter and longer assignments.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins (2015)Lowenhaupt Tsing978-0691178325$132.19
Animal Intimacies: interspecies Relatedness in India's Central Himalayas (Animal Lives) (2018)Govindrajan978-0226559988$84.79

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Why We Misbehave
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Ian McManus
SSC712
View

Despite the belief that human behavior is driven mainly by reason and logic, individuals regularly make seemingly irrational choices. In other words, smart people make stupid decisions all the time. Using key readings, ideas, and examples from behavioral economics, human psychology, political science, and sociology this first-year seminar will explore why people think and act in ways which appear to be completely illogical. We will learn about how social and psychological factors, such as instinctual behavior, societal pressure, and mental framing, can dramatically affect our day-to-day decision-making. The class will pay special attention to understanding the tension between the rational expectations for how people should behave versus the reality of how humans really act. In doing so, the class will challenge us to rethink the ways in which we understand ourselves and how we interact with our world. We will learn how to develop our ideas and express them to others through written assignments, class discussions, group work, and interactive activities.

Marlboro College’s First Year Seminars (FYS) are designed around different approaches to an underlying theme and draw on interdisciplinary and creative methods. This year’s theme is “Ways of Knowing.” This seminar introduces students to the Marlboro Promise through an exploration of a topic about which your instructor is passionate. These courses allow students to participate actively in their own learning and to begin to acquire the clear writing and speaking skills necessary for independent, intellectual achievement throughout college and beyond. The FYS offers ample opportunities for collaborative work with peers while specifically created co-curricular events open up access to wider on-campus and outside resources. Apart from learning how a college course works, building connections with faculty, staff, and other first-year students, and honing the critical and creative thinking skills essential to flourishing in college, these seminars help develop leadership and project management skills by guiding students through the inception, progression, and completion of shorter and longer assignments.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mistakes were made (but not by me): why we justify foolish beliefs, bad decisions, and hurtful actsTavris & Aronson9780544574786$44.70

For First Year Seminars offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Erasure and Voice
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Identity, Place, Belonging
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Mapping the Knower and the Known
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: The Joy of Weaving Relations
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Why We Misbehave

Gender Studies

Women Between Worlds: Interpreters, Guides, and Survivors
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM2533
View
Global Perspective

Although typically the encounter between the Americas and Europe is conceived of as a belic conflict primarily involving men of arms, the truth is that women were also at the epicenter of such encounter. Although many served voluntarily or forcefully as guides and scouts for soldiers and explorers, this course looks specifically at women who were at the center of the encounter. We will examine figures such as Malinche from Mexico, Anacaona from Dominican Republic, Catalina from Colombia and contrast them with women from the United States. 

  • Monday 2:00pm-3:00pm in Dalrymple/D13

For Gender Studies offerings, also see:

Gender in the Classroom and Stereotypes: A Conversation on How to Build a Healthier Study Environment
Mothers of the Word/World: Latin American Women Poets
Re-Imagining the Human: Colonial Remains within Climate Futures

History

Europeans and Non-Europeans: Encounter, Exploration, and Colonization
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
HUM2528
View
Global Perspective

This course focuses on the background to the European expansion and colonization of large portions of the globe that began in the sixteenth century.  Prior to the Spanish expansion in the Americas and the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Europeans dealt with the rest of the world in complex fashion, ranging from long distance explorations of Eastern regions by a variety of individuals (of whom Marco Polo is probably the best known) to violent encounters such as the Crusades often (though not always) waged on Jerusalem and the Holy Land.  In this course, we will read narrative accounts, both by travelers and fictionalized romances, of Europeans encountering and describing the wider world.  We will talk about how Europeans did (or did not) use racial and religious images to construct their understanding of other peoples.  Texts will focus on early encounters with Africans, relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews (especially in Spain), and European attitudes towards distant groups such as the Mongols.  Finally, the course will end by looking at the differences between these earlier encounters and the new racial system that underpinned both the African slave trade and the colonization of the Americas.

  • Courses in History, Cultural History or related and permission of instructor
  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102

Writing Seminar: Introduction to Medieval Studies
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM1384
View
Writing Seminar

This course provides students a broad introduction to the European world from the late Roman empire to the end of the fifteenth century. There are three major goals of the course. First, students should become acquainted with the broad changes and narratives of medieval history as well as its significance to modern European history. Secondly, as an introduction to the historical discipline, this course offers students the opportunity to learn the methods of historical research: how to use primary sources, historiography, and to formulate historical narratives and arguments. Finally, this course is a Writing Seminar; we will write something every week. Some class time will be dedicated to discussing the art of writing a clear essay, peer reviewing other students' papers, and preparing material for the Clear Writing portfolio. The weekly readings for the course will be primary sources drawn from the diverse different forms of sources on which medieval history is based: letters, sermons, contracts, philosophical works, devotional texts and chronicles. The writing assignments of the course will involve the reading of secondary sources, allowing students to compare the primary sources of the weekly readings with modern scholarly literature on the same topics and to assess how the documents have been interpreted.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

For History offerings, also see:

Brush, Sword, and Hoe: Ancient Chinese History & Culture
Women Between Worlds: Interpreters, Guides, and Survivors
Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft

Interdisciplinary

Schooling, Structures and Self
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Janaki Natarajan
SSC714
View

This course will focus on three sets of Social Experiences:  

*Examine our own individual learning experiences, particularly in schools.

*Participate in local K-12 classroom or afterschool activities to observe, learn and practice.

*Analyze the experiences in order understand and explain educational settings.

These steps will allow us to learn by experiencing/doing and thinking, i.e. through Praxis.  Faculty for this course will help each student organize a placement in a school such as Marlboro Elementary or with an afterschool program such as the Boys & Girls Club.  We expect each student to log approximately 6 hours per week in their placement.  Participants will keep a field journal on their observation and participation.  There will be written reflections on readings for the course.  A final presentation and paper will explore the current tendencies in the field of education and the underlying politica-economic forces in order to explain and suggest changes of direction.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Languages

Elementary Spanish I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM1346
View
Global Perspective

This is a language course for first-year students of Spanish and is designed to aid development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. It is part of a year-long course that covers basic grammar along with a variety of vocabulary and cultural topics, and it prepares students for the second-semester Spanish.  In addition to written work and exercises, students are expected to complete home-work assignments in the Vistas website. The course meets three times a week for an hour and twenty minutes plus one hour extra for conversation.

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
VivaDonley9781680056433$248.00

Intermediate French I
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
HUM2567
View

Intermediate French I is designed as a second-year French course for students who have completed first-year French or its equivelent. Students will strengthen their language skills and cultural competency through vocabulary, grammar and readings. You will contribute to the classroom community by using French in and out of class, colaborating wiht classmates, and taking responsibility for timely completion of all assignments, quizzes, compositions, projects and tests.

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102

Intermediate Spanish I
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
HUM1403
View
Global Perspective

Strives for mastery of complex grammatical structures and continues work on writing and reading skills. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. This course meets three times a week plus an additional 50 minutes for conversation. It also requires workbook online. Prerequisite: At least two consecutive semesters of college Spanish

  • A year of college level Spanish or equivalent
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
ImaginaBlanco, Tocamaiza Hatch9781626801097$236.40

For Languages offerings, also see:

Intermediate Greek
Intermediate Latin
Introductory Greek
Introductory Latin

Liberal Studies

For Liberal Studies offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Identity, Place, Belonging
Mothers of the Word/World: Latin American Women Poets
To Lead and Be Led: Community Governance Colloquium

Literature

Mothers of the Word/World: Latin American Women Poets
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM2421
View
Designated Writing

In this course we will read poetry written by women from different geographical regions of Latin America and the Hispanic world, including Brazil and Equatorial Guinea, Africa. The primary attention of our discussion will be on theme, style and a discussion of what can be called “poetic vision” and “poetic contents.” Many of the writers, such as Gabriela Mistral or Rosario Castellanos were public intellectuals at a time when such position was defined as an exclusively male activity. In their poetry and writings we see the strategies they used to circumvent the trials and tribulations of women who dared to be themselves were forced to confront. Because through their writings they created beautiful poetry as well as an alternative vision for us, they are mothers of the word, but also of the world. Although the course is taught in English, knowledge of Spanish and Portuguese will be helpful though not necessary. Students will be allowed to write papers in any of the three languages covered in the course (Spanish, Portuguese and English). The course will not be taught strictly as a lecture, although lectures will be given, and it is expected that students come prepared and participate in lively discussions. I will provide some general background and historical context for the poems, but I do not want my voice to be the only voice interrupting the silence. To that end, I ask that you come to class having read each of these poets by the date the name first appears on the syllabus and that you have written about the poem. As we progress students will be asked to read some secondary scholarship on the poet as well prior to class.  Since some of you will be approaching these poems for reading pleasure, literary or cultural interest, and some as creative writers, I hope we can listen to one another and learn from this variety of perspectives. I hope that good and spirited debate can be our weekly classroom delight. Students are expected to read, write and participate in informed class discussions. The grade is calculated taking all of these factors into consideration.  

  • Prior exposure to poetry is desirable
  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Song of the Simple Truth: The Complete Poems of Julia de Burgos (Dual Language Edition:: Spanish, English) (Spanish and English Edition)de Burgos, Agueros9781880684245$20.00
Madwomen: The "Locas mujeres" Poems of Gabriela Mistral, a Bilingual Edition PaperbackMistral, Couch9780226531915$20.00
Meditation on the Threshold. Bilingual AnthologyCastellanos. Palley9780916950804$15.00
Clean Slate. New and other poems.Zamora, Randall, Randall1880684098$15.00

Re-Imagining the Human: Colonial Remains within Climate Futures
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Rituparna Mitra
HUM2529
View
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

This course explores how literature helps us rethink the relationship between human and environment, between history and earth-stories. How may we achieve what Donna Haraway describes in Staying with The Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene as “thinking with non-human others” (animal, plant, bio-genetic, technological, etc.) and “imagining and caring for other worlds”? What complicates this project is the presence of those who have struggled and continue to struggle to be recognized as human on the basis of race, culture, gender, language, sexuality, etc. For them, is the focus on posthumanism, decentering the human, too soon? Or can interdependencies with “non-human others” throw fresh light on struggles with exclusion? Questions of language, identity, race, and culture have been important to postcolonial thought as it has evolved and our readings will attend to these. What questions may a posthuman turn amid the ecological crisis add to the recuperation of othered bodies and knowledges? What new forms of marginalization may be recognized through our shifting understanding of the boundaries of the human? Most importantly, what new alliances may be forged? In sum, this course will chart how colonial legacies interact with shifts in environmental thought in the recent years to reshape the boundaries of the normative human.

  • None
  • Monday 9:00am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 9:00am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D38
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Life and Times of Michael KCoetzee9780140074482$12.00
AbengCliff9780452274839$12.25
People of the WhaleHogan9780393335347$14.00
Salt Fish GirlLai9780887623820$16.68
The Lost ThingTan9780734411389$15.00
BintiOkorafor9780765385253$5.00

For Literature offerings, also see:

"We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live": Workshop in Short Narrative
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Erasure and Voice
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Identity, Place, Belonging
How Poems Get Made: Intermediate and Advanced Poetry Workshop
Mapping Myth and its Afterlife
Women Between Worlds: Interpreters, Guides, and Survivors
Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs

Mathematics

Calculus
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Onur Agirseven
NSC515
View

A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science.

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Calculus III
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Onur Agirseven
NSC625
View

Calculus III continues the development of the techniques of Calculus into multi-variable and vector-valued functions. 

  • Calc 2 or permission of instructor
  • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Linear Algebra
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Matthew Ollis
NSC164
View

Linear Algebra is important for its remarkable demonstration of abstraction and idealization on the one hand, and for its applications to many branches of math and science on the other. This tutorial covers linear algebra in n-dimensional space. Matrices, vector spaces and transformations are studied extensively.

Real Analysis
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Matthew Ollis
NSC336
View

Real Analysis is the study of the real number system and functions of a real variable. In this course we look at how the real numbers are built and put the results developed in the Calculus sequence on a more rigorous footing. More importantly, we'll probe the limits of what the tools of Calculus can do, meeting lots of exotic examples that test and stretch our intuition (and hence provide motivation for the aforementioned rigor).

Serious Fun: The Math and More of Games and Puzzles
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Matthew Ollis
NSC647
View

Game Studies is a fast-growing field that draws on approaches from many different disciplines.  We will study games from a variety of perspectives including a good dose of math (no prior math required).  We will also add puzzles, which can be thought of as one-player games, to the mix.   We'll play a lot, we'll write a lot, we'll solve a lot of puzzles and we'll do some designing in one or more of the Heroscape, Pandemic or Summoner Wars game systems.  [Note: course requires at least six students in order to run.]

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Rules of Play: Game Design FundamentalsSalen, Zimmerman262240459$31.97

Statistics Workshop
( Variable Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
NSC574
View

A follow-up to Statistics (NSC123) in which students acquire and hone the statistical skills needed for their work on Plan or simply pursue more advanced topics within the field. Course content is driven by the interests and requirements of those taking the class. Variable credit (1-4). May be repeated for credit.

  • Statistics (NSC123) or permission of the instructor
  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus
( Variable Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Onur Agirseven
NSC701
View

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into ten units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam or who just want to learn some math. Over the semester, three to four units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace.

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

For Mathematics offerings, also see:

Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation

Music

A Personal Overview of Jazz and Its Relations
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Ned Rothenberg
ART2661
View

Ned Rothenberg, Musician in Residence at Marlboro, and a professional practitioner of Jazz and Improvised music with wide international experience, will lead a class considering key practitioners of the form over the last 80 years.

Through weekly sessions of listening and discussion, we will explore the gamut of this music through its master musicians,  from its roots to the contemporary, from the "traditional”  to the “experimental”.  There will be weekly listening assignments, in-class discussion, critique and project concentrations on artists of the student’s choice.

  • Wednesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

Chamber Music
(1.00 Credit — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Jake Charkey
ART2662
View

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string and brass instruments.

  • Tuesday 4:00pm-6:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

Madrigal Choir
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
ART825
View

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit.Prerequisite: None; ability to read music helpful

  • Monday 4:00pm-5:30pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall
  • Thursday 4:00pm-5:30pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

Music Fundamentals I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Matan Rubinstein
ART14
View

A study of musical practice and theory from basic notation to species counterpoint. Work concentrates on intense practice of singing, rhythm and music reading. 

  • Monday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
  • Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

Popular Music and Its Discontents
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Matan Rubinstein
ART2334
View

Popular music is an amorphous, loose term. We will undertake an examination of "Pop Music", charting a course through the diverse fields of music (and musical) industry, and exploring critical, cultural, esthetic and social notions that inform the term. We will look at the evolution of the now complex product enfolded within a "pop song", a diverse array of media, product, and cultural attribution, chart the shifting boundaries and flawed logic informing both pop music's making and its reception, and explore the forces – market and otherwise – that shaped this music for over a century. 

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

Songs and Songwriting
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Matan Rubinstein
ART2419
View

This course is both a hands-on songwriting workshop, and a critical explorations of songs as a craft bringing together words and melody. As general practice we will alternate between academically- oriented analysis of both melodic and lyrical aspects of songs, and create songs from music and lyrics created by students in workshop format. The course is open to musicians and lyricists alike.

  • Some music background for musicians or some pre-existent writing and poetry from lyricists
  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

Painting

Intermediate and Advanced Painting Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Amy Beecher
ART2659
View

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced level students in the visual arts. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works in progress. Students at the intermediate level will be given three week -long project prompts and technical demonstrations. Those on or about to be on Plan will select one body of work to focus on throughout the course. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely painting or drawing We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of a body of work and Plan Exhibition. Prerequisite: Comprehensive work in drawing or painting at the college level or by permission of instructor

$100 Materials fee

  • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber-Up
  • Friday 10:30am-12:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber-Up

Philosophy

Ancient Philosophy
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Casey Ford
HUM2538
View

In this course we will survey the rich and diverse philosophical thought of the Ancient Greek and Roman worlds. In addition to closely studying major works of philosophy from these traditions, our primary goal will be to see how ancient philosophy strove for a holistic understanding of the world in which human life is situated. We will see how philosophical thought involved a constant intersection of questions in metaphysics (the study of being), physics (the study of the natural world), ethics (the study of human character and action), and politics (the study of human communities). We will begin with a study of the fragments left to us from the pre-Socratic philosophers on the nature of the cosmos, before turning to some of major philosophical dialogues and treatises offered by Plato and Aristotle. We will then examine the diverse lines of philosophical transitions from Greek thought to philosophy in the early Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, focusing specifically on the development of classical atomism and the ethics of Stoicism. One question that will guide our study throughout is how certain conceptions of the natural world in ancient thought led to conceptions of the human self, action, and ethical life.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Basic Writings of AristotleAristotle978-0375757990$24.00
On the Nature of ThingsLucretius978-0872205871$16.99
Stoic Philosophy of Seneca: Essays and LettersSeneca978-0393004595$12.82

Michel Foucault and the Feminist Challenge
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Casey Ford
HUM2537
View

This seminar will focus on the philosophical, social, and historical work of Michel Foucault. It will conclude with a study of how his ideas on power, identity, sexuality, punishment, and the body at once influenced important work in the contemporary feminist tradition and drew critical challenges from it. We will focus on three major texts from Foucault’s extensive and rich body of work: The History of Madness, on the origin of the exclusionary notion of the “madness” in the modern psychiatric institution; Discipline and Punish, on the transformation of systems of punishment and their effects on the body; and The History of Sexuality, Volume 1, on the relation between power and sexual identity. Our study of these major works will be supplemented by important essays, interviews, and course lectures from the Collège de France. From the Feminist tradition we will read a selection of possible texts by Silvia Federici, Judith Butler, Lisa Guenther, Amy Allen, and Nancy Fraser. Foucault’s work draws our attention to the ways that human identity, gender, sexuality are produced within and by historical relations of power, rather than as innate, universal, and unalterable realities.  As the feminist tradition has recognized, this means taking seriously how we conceive the possibilities for the critique of and resistance to power itself and the defense of oppressed identities.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Madness and CivilizationFoucault978-0679721109$34.75
Discipline and PunishFoucault978-0679752554$27.50
The History of SexualityFoucault978-0679724698$15.50

Senior Plan Seminar in Philosophy
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
HUM2390
View

This course is for seniors on Plan in Philosophy who will be engaging with each other, and with selected texts, to develop their work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

  • permission of the instructor
  • Thursday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D35

For Philosophy offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Mapping the Knower and the Known
I don't believe in God, but I miss Him: Spiritual Longings in a Secular Age
Popular Music and Its Discontents

Photography

Intro to Photography
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Nicholas Meyer
ART2641
View

 This course will be an introduction to analog and digital photography with an emphasis given both to visual expression and technique.

Additional Fee:$120

  • none
  • Monday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Photography, 12th EditionLondon, Stone, Upton9780134482026 and 10134482026$28.00

Series, Sequence and the Photobook
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Nicholas Meyer
ART2663
View

A question for many artists is how to put together a finished, cohesive body of work. For manyphotographers, perhaps the most significant display of their work and the communication oftheir vision to a mass audience is using the book as a vehicle.We will look at the tools used in the creation of photo/artist books such as structure, design,layout, seriality and dissemination of information.. Class time will be spent delving into thehistory of photo books from zines to mass produced works and the artists that created them.In addition, we will learn how to use series and sequence as well as other tools of narration anddescription to create a body of work in the book format.  even though the class willpredominately be looking at photography books students working within other visual artmediums would be welcome to take the class too as we will be looking at the craft of bookmaking and the artist book as sculptural form.This class will include in-depth discussion, critique and hands-on work culminating in an end ofsemester photo book.

Additional Fee:$100

  • ART2473
  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

For Photography offerings, also see:

Constructed Realities

Physics

A Glimpse into Physics through Experiments
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Sara Salimbeni
NSC702
View

Course designed for students with little or no previous exposure to physics. Students will use experiments to explore topics in mechanics, thermodynamics and optics, and build physical intuition. Emphasis will be put on the use of the scientific method. 

  • High school algebra
  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Astrophysics
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Sara Salimbeni
NSC600
View

A general survey of modern astrophysics, including the current state of research. Topics may include: structure, evolution, and death of stars; structure of galaxies; interstellar medium; cosmology. The primary text will be Carroll & Ostlie, "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics", which will be supplemented by journal articles, as appropriate. Modern research methods and tools for data analysis may also be introduced.

Gender in the Classroom and Stereotypes: A Conversation on How to Build a Healthier Study Environment
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
NSC703
View

Analyses of authors of academic papers showed that there is a gender gap in the STEM fields with Physics having one the largest gaps with only 13% of the publications authored by women (Luke Holman et al., PLoS Biol. 2018 Apr; 16(4): e2004956). In this course students will research this topic to understand the origin of such a gap, and what kind of actions have been taken and could be made to increase the number of female scientists, and how the classroom environment and curriculum in high school and college science classes affect the success of women in science. 

  • Monday 8:30am-9:50am in Dining Hall/staples

For Physics offerings, also see:

Calculus

Politics

International Relations
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Ian McManus
SSC710
View
Global Perspective

International Relations is increasingly relevant as the world grows more and more interconnected through trade and commerce, migration, the Internet and social media, and pressing global issues such as climate change. The goal of the course is for students to learn about the main concepts and theories that are useful for making sense of contemporary debates and challenges in international politics. We will study how recent history and current events have shaped the ways in which states and other actors interact with one another in a globalized world. The class covers major topics in international relations including international cooperation, security and conflict, trade, and international law and human rights. By the end of the class, students will be able to critique common academic and policy arguments about global affairs and will have acquired the skills and tools to begin their own analyses of the international realm.

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

For Politics offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Why We Misbehave

Psychology

Brain and Behavior
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Thomas Toleno
SSC574
View

An introduction to the neuroscience of the brain and its impact on behavior.

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W

Persistent Problems of Psychology
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Thomas Toleno
SSC34
View

An introduction to the history and theory of Psychology, offering a survey of psychology's major perspectives.

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W

Psychotherapies
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Thomas Toleno
SSC441
View

Major theories of personality are discussed and compared. The emphasis is on the underlying assumptions regarding persons and the therapies and psychotherapies which have emerged.

  • Abnormal Psychology or permission of instructor
  • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D33W

For Psychology offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Mapping the Knower and the Known
First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Why We Misbehave
I don't believe in God, but I miss Him: Spiritual Longings in a Secular Age

Religion

I don't believe in God, but I miss Him: Spiritual Longings in a Secular Age
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Amer Latif
HUM2535
View

We live in a time where despite the decline of institutional religion, spirituality is on the rise. The Pew Research Center reports that more Americans identify as “spiritual but not religious” than ever before (2017). The goal of this course is to understand the cultural context in which the longing to connect with something bigger than oneself finds myriad expressions in literature, film, and song. We will begin by looking at manifestations of this longing in popular culture such as the film Garden State and lyrics of bands like Death Cab for Cutie, Arcade Fire, The Postal Service etc. We will then use Greek myths and Sufi metaphysics to develop a cross-cultural and trans-historic perspective on longing and yearning as a constitutive factor of human nature. We will complement this mythical and religious perspective with naturalistic explanations of human longing from biology and neuroscience. Finally, we will consider Charles Taylor’s argument in A Secular Age where he offers a genealogy of our culture that illuminates the relationship between the growth of unbelief and the increase in spiritual longing. We will learn how to use writing and class discussions as intentional practices for clarifying and developing our thoughts.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mistakes were made (but not by me): why we justify foolish beliefs, bad decisions, and hurtful actsTavris & Aronson9780544574786$44.70
How (not) to be secular: Reading Charles TaylorSmith9780802867612$12.96
First You Write a Sentence: The Elements of Reading, Writingand LifeMoran9780143134343$16.58

Plan Writing Seminar
(2.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Amer Latif
HUM779
View

Writing seminar for seniors. Students not completing a plan in religion can take this course as well but need permission of the instructor. This course can be taken for two to six credits.

Sources & Methods in Religious Studies
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Amer Latif
HUM1117
View

An examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion.

To Lead and Be Led: Community Governance Colloquium
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Amer Latif
HUM2566
View

Working with others can be a source of joy or immense frustration. In this course we will explore the nature of collaboration within a self-governing community such as Marlboro College. Our goal is to identify the elements of design and the actions and attitudes of participants that lead to productive and satisfying collaborations. This course will be of particular use for students currently serving on committees or hoping to serve on committees.

  • Wednesday 9:00am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D22A

For Religion offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Mapping the Knower and the Known

Sculpture

For Sculpture offerings, also see:

Constructed Realities

Sociology

Inequality and U.S. Social Policy
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
SSC666
View

How is social policy developed, implemented, and contested in the United States? Sociological research, oral histories, and policy briefs on welfare, housing, and education will be used to trace the historical trajectory of social policies. We will begin by understanding poverty, demographic trends and rising inequality in the United States and shift to analyzing how the United States provides (or doesn’t) for its citizens. What risks and responsibilities are borne by the individual vs. the state? What programs and benefits are universally provided vs. needs-based? Rich ethnographies that describe what it means to live at the lower and upper rungs of society contextualize the policies. Key to understanding the American context is an analysis of race as it intersects with gender and class. By the end of the course, students will be able to explain how issues become social problems and get on the policy agenda, as well as the factors shaping policy (re)construction.

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Self and Social Reproduction: Introduction to the Sociological Imagination
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
SSC679
View

Consider the question: How did I get here?  I’m at a private college in rural Vermont, but how did I really get here?  What social forces shaped my trajectory?  What was transmitted—materially and culturally—to me from my family and social context?  And what does that mean for my potential mobility and agency in the future?  This introductory course will help you interrogate the intersection of your biography and history, a skill known as the sociological imagination. We will read a range of sociological texts and complete journal-writing exercises to help locate ourselves in society.

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

For Sociology offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: Why We Misbehave

Theater

Seminar in Performance: Plan Productions
( Variable Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Brenda Foley
ART2649
View

This course offers students the opportunity to engage in the theatrical process through participation in senior Plan productions (the number of which varies in any given year). Auditions and casting will take place at the beginning of the semester and rehearsal dates and times will be scheduled following casting. The course is for variable credits and open to students interested in all aspects of production: acting, design, stage managing, costumes, light, sound, and props. No previous experience is required to participate.

  • Audition
  • Monday 6:15pm-8:15pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
  • Wednesday 6:15pm-8:15pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
  • Friday 6:15pm-8:15pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Shakespeare for Performance
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Normi Noel
ART2665
View

Shakespeare is for everyone and in this interdisciplinary performance class students will explore his timeless themes through voice work, movement, and theatre games, to experience the potential power and nuance of language when it is deeply rooted in the body.  

Beginning with monologues, and then moving on to scene work, we will play with how the structure of the verse informs the actor, and why the rhythms of iambic pentameter can connect us deeply to the character and the text.   As vocal and physical tensions gradually release, our own personal narratives can transform into universal stories, within the context of the plays, awakening us, actor and audience, as we breathe into 500 year old language.

Assignments will include memorizing monologues and scenes, and some rehearsing outside of class.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

For Theater offerings, also see:

The Body As Material and Metaphor

To Be Determined

College for Social Innovation: Becoming a Problem Solver
(8.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
CDS639
View

College for Social Innovation aims to educate and inspire the next generation of problem solvers for humanity's tough challenges. At a macro level, we hope that Social Innovation Fellows will go on to do good in the world in a way that best fits your temperament, strengths and passions. At a micro level BaPS - in combination with the Social Innovator's Toolbox and the daily work at your internships - will help you develop four Power Tools and two essential Daily Practices that will improve your ability to solve problems big and small.

Visual Arts

Art Seminar Critique
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Fall 2019
ART2640
View

This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. Student will share work and writing as well as present on artists of influence. An overview of professional practices will also be included. This is a required course for seniors on Plan in the Visual Arts. The class meets Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:20 except the five days there will be visiting artists when the meeting time is 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

  • Preliminary or Final Plan Application on file or by instructors' permission
  • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

Constructed Realities
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
ART2639
View

 The histories of photography and, more recently, sculpture are rife with examples of artists who are not content to simply observe reality as it exists but who find it necessary to construct their own worlds. This course focuses on the conjunction of the disciplines of sculpture/installation art and photography to provide a venue for students to make work that reflects this approach. The end product of the work of this class will sometimes be photographs, sometimes sculpture, and at other times a mingling of the two. Developing skills in both will be important to successful work. Objects and spaces will be transformed and become the object of new observations, new work. Narrative, theatrical, and time-based work will be encouraged. Collaboration between classmates will be expected.

  • Any intro level art class
  • Monday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
  • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

Contemporary Art Seminar
(3.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Amy Beecher
ART2666
View

This seminar corresponds to artist Fay Ku’s exhibition, Ordinary Mouths Singing. In lieu of a textbook, students will learn from curating, installing, and programming the exhibition of Ku’s work, which reimagines Asian and American folktales as contemporary drawings. Students will conduct a studio visit with Fay Ku to select work for the exhibition and learn about the texts, films, and other art that have inspired her oeuvre. They will also have the chance to prepare a meal with Ku and assist the installation of the exhibition. Then, students will develop their own interpretations that form the basis of a culminating public tour. Participants are required to attend all six of our evening sessions, all events related to the exhibition during its one-month run, and to devote a minimum of four hours assisting the exhibition’s installation and deinstallation. Last class is 11/14. Limited to 8 students. 

Additional Fee:$20

  • Thursday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-102

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM2531
View
Writing Seminar
Global Perspective

What is craft, and how is it valued?  How does it relate to industry and to art?  What are its philosophical underpinnings? And, how does it shape a life devoted to its practice?  In this course, we will address these questions and more by exploring craft practice as a means of discovery.  We will begin by considering (and practicing!) writing as a craft.  Then we’ll look historically at the role of craft in society, including ceramics, metalsmithing, and carpentry.  Next, we’ll engage in a collective craft project.  Finally, students will interview and observe craft professionals living in the area.  Throughout the semester, we will hone our craft of expression through consistent drafting, revision, and refinement of essays.  This class aims to blend thinking and making for a deeper understanding of the value of working with one's hands.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

For Visual Arts offerings, also see:

Intermediate & Advanced Film / Video Plan Seminar
Intermediate and Advanced Painting Seminar
Intro to Photography
Introduction to Ceramics
Series, Sequence and the Photobook
The Six Principal Modes of Documentary Film

World Studies Program

World Studies Senior Seminar
(1.00 Credit — Advanced)

Fall 2019
Jaime Tanner
WSP2
View
Global Perspective

The World Studies Senior Seminar is required for World Studies Program students.  It is open to all students who are returning from significant fieldwork and need to consider how best to convert these experiences into Plan.   Time: TBD Room: Library 202

  • Thursday 11:30am-12:30pm in Brown Science/Sci 213

For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

First Year Seminar in Ways of Knowing: The Joy of Weaving Relations
International Relations
Re-Imagining the Human: Colonial Remains within Climate Futures

Writing

"We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live": Workshop in Short Narrative
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Bronwen Tate
ART2647
View

In this workshop-based course, students will explore how to transform the chaotic matter of lived experience into artful narrative prose. We will alternate between targeted exercises aimed at developing intention and skill in the complex, often simultaneous, elements of story craft—including point of view, dialogue, description, scene-construction, characterization, conflict, pacing, and world-building—and creating and revising complete narratives. Our work will be guided by discussions of short narratives, fictional and nonfictional, by writers including Tobias Wolff, Alice Munro, Joan Didion, Alexander Chee, and Carmen Maria Machado, and by Jeff VanderMeer’s Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction.

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Crafting Imaginative FictionVanderMeer9781419729669$17.00
Steering the Craft: A 21st-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of StoryLeGuin978-0544611610$6.00

English for Academic Purposes
(1.00 Credit — Multi-Level)

Fall 2019
Maggie Patari
HUM2565
View

This course is specifically designed for students who are new to the American classroom. EAP not only aims to help international students master the language and style that are used in American classrooms, but also to discuss American and Marlboro classroom culture, observe typical college dynamics and provide a space for non-US students to exchange insight on any aspect of their academic experience they might want to get perspective on. It's a great way to work on writing skills, and get help with writing assignments from other courses!

  • Tuesday 3:00pm-4:00pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

How Poems Get Made: Intermediate and Advanced Poetry Workshop
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Fall 2019
Bronwen Tate
ART2645
View

In this workshop-based course, intermediate and advanced writing students will set their own goals for the production and revision of a body of work in poetry. We will alternate between small-group workshops and full-group discussions of books by essential poets including William Shakespeare, John Donne, William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, and Lucille Clifton. Reading historical work alongside more recent poems will allow students to deepen their knowledge of poetic traditions and consider aspects of language and culture that remain familiar as well as those that have changed. Drawing on James Longenbach’s How Poems Get Made, our discussions and workshops will encompass elements of poetic craft including diction, syntax, voice, figure, rhythm, echo, image, and repetition. 

  • Experience with poetry and/or workshop-based courses
  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
How Poems Get MadeLongenbach9780393355208$11.00
The Collected Poems of W.B. YeatsW.B Yeats978-0684807317$12.00
The Collected Poems of Langton HughesLangston Hughes978-0679764083$20.00
Lyrical Ballads 1798 and 1802William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge978-0199601967$10.00
The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton, 1965-2010Lucille Clifton978-1934414903$25.00
The Complete Poems of Emily DickinsonEmily Dickinson978-0316184137$14.00
The Collected Poems of Wallace StevensWallace Stevens978-1101911686$14.00
John Donne: The Major WorksJohn Donne978-0199537945$15.00
The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Sonnets and PoemsWilliam Shakespeare978-0199535798$14.00

Writing Seminars

Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Gloria Biamonte
HUM1254
View
Writing Seminar

 “When I was a little kid,” writes Scott McCloud, “I knew exactly what comics were. Comics were those bright colorful magazines filled with bad art, stupid stories and guys in tights.”  With these words, McCloud launches into his exploration of the art-form of comics—a form whose potential and “hidden power” we will explore in this writing seminar.   Using McCloud’s Understanding Comics as our starting point, we will examine how several contemporary graphic artists use words, pictures and narratives to tell stories of their lives. Artists/writers may include:  Art Spiegelman, David Small, Vera Brosgol, Jarrett Krosoczka, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Will Eisner.  We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to a longer documented essay.  Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts.  Prerequisite: None  

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Understanding Comics: The Invisible ArtMccloud9780060976255$14.48
Maus I: My Father Bleeds HistorySpiegelman9780394747231$9.32
Maus II: And Here My Troubles BeginSpiegelman9780679729778$10.28
Persepolis: The Story of a ChildhoodSatrapi9780375714573$6.66
Persepolis 2: The Story of a ReturnSatrapi9780375714665$7.20
BlanketsThompson9781770462182$21.53
Good Talk: A Memoir in ConversationsJacobs9780399589041$19.95

Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Gloria Biamonte
HUM1254
View
Writing Seminar

 “When I was a little kid,” writes Scott McCloud, “I knew exactly what comics were. Comics were those bright colorful magazines filled with bad art, stupid stories and guys in tights.”  With these words, McCloud launches into his exploration of the art-form of comics—a form whose potential and “hidden power” we will explore in this writing seminar.   Using McCloud’s Understanding Comics as our starting point, we will examine how several contemporary graphic artists use words, pictures and narratives to tell stories of their lives. Artists/writers may include:  Art Spiegelman, David Small, Vera Brosgol, Jarrett Krosoczka, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Will Eisner.  We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to a longer documented essay.  Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts.  Prerequisite: None  

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Understanding Comics: The Invisible ArtMccloud9780060976255$14.48
Maus I: My Father Bleeds HistorySpiegelman9780394747231$9.32
Maus II: And Here My Troubles BeginSpiegelman9780679729778$10.28
Persepolis: The Story of a ChildhoodSatrapi9780375714573$6.66
Persepolis 2: The Story of a ReturnSatrapi9780375714665$7.20
BlanketsThompson9781770462182$21.53
Good Talk: A Memoir in ConversationsJacobs9780399589041$19.95

Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cooking
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Todd Smith
CDS630
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Writing Seminar

Why do we cook food, and how does a process as simple as boiling an egg change it so dramatically? In this course we will explore the connection between cooking and chemistry. We will discuss how food is modified by steps we take in the kitchen, and the chemistry behind those changes. Part of cooking is knowing your ingredients, and we will grow some of our ingredients in the Marlboro College greenhouse. Experimentation is central to chemistry, and part of cooking, too. Each of our growing and cooking projects will contain an element of experimentation. To enrich and extend our work our focus we will read authors such as Samin Nosrat, Laurie Colwin, and Jose Andres. Your work for this course will also include essays that connect your readings and your cooking projects, and central to this writing process is peer review and revision of your work. 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Home CookingColwin9780307474414$15.00
Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat6Nosrat9781476753836$22.50
We Fed an IslandAndres9780062864499$18.00

Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cooking
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Todd Smith
CDS630
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Writing Seminar

Why do we cook food, and how does a process as simple as boiling an egg change it so dramatically? In this course we will explore the connection between cooking and chemistry. We will discuss how food is modified by steps we take in the kitchen, and the chemistry behind those changes. Part of cooking is knowing your ingredients, and we will grow some of our ingredients in the Marlboro College greenhouse. Experimentation is central to chemistry, and part of cooking, too. Each of our growing and cooking projects will contain an element of experimentation. To enrich and extend our work our focus we will read authors such as Samin Nosrat, Laurie Colwin, and Jose Andres. Your work for this course will also include essays that connect your readings and your cooking projects, and central to this writing process is peer review and revision of your work. 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Home CookingColwin9780307474414$15.00
Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat6Nosrat9781476753836$22.50
We Fed an IslandAndres9780062864499$18.00

Writing Seminar: Introduction to Medieval Studies
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM1384
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Writing Seminar

This course provides students a broad introduction to the European world from the late Roman empire to the end of the fifteenth century. There are three major goals of the course. First, students should become acquainted with the broad changes and narratives of medieval history as well as its significance to modern European history. Secondly, as an introduction to the historical discipline, this course offers students the opportunity to learn the methods of historical research: how to use primary sources, historiography, and to formulate historical narratives and arguments. Finally, this course is a Writing Seminar; we will write something every week. Some class time will be dedicated to discussing the art of writing a clear essay, peer reviewing other students' papers, and preparing material for the Clear Writing portfolio. The weekly readings for the course will be primary sources drawn from the diverse different forms of sources on which medieval history is based: letters, sermons, contracts, philosophical works, devotional texts and chronicles. The writing assignments of the course will involve the reading of secondary sources, allowing students to compare the primary sources of the weekly readings with modern scholarly literature on the same topics and to assess how the documents have been interpreted.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Writing Seminar: The Cultural Politics of Disney
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Kathryn Ratcliff
HUM2536
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Writing Seminar

This writing seminar explores U.S. history and culture through the lens of the Disney brand.  How and when did Disney become such a powerful cultural force?  What explains the enormous popularity of Disney?  How can we navigate the tension between Disney as a purveyor of wholesome, family values and a commercially driven global empire? In addressing these questions we will analyze and write about Disney stories, characters and experiences, with particular emphasis on representations of race, ethnicity, class, and gender.  Disney will offer a case study for engaging popular culture as an arena where social, economic, and political values and meanings are created and contested.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class meeting to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Writing Seminar: The Cultural Politics of Disney
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
Kathryn Ratcliff
HUM2536
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Writing Seminar

This writing seminar explores U.S. history and culture through the lens of the Disney brand.  How and when did Disney become such a powerful cultural force?  What explains the enormous popularity of Disney?  How can we navigate the tension between Disney as a purveyor of wholesome, family values and a commercially driven global empire? In addressing these questions we will analyze and write about Disney stories, characters and experiences, with particular emphasis on representations of race, ethnicity, class, and gender.  Disney will offer a case study for engaging popular culture as an arena where social, economic, and political values and meanings are created and contested.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class meeting to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Fall 2019
HUM2531
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Writing Seminar
Global Perspective

What is craft, and how is it valued?  How does it relate to industry and to art?  What are its philosophical underpinnings? And, how does it shape a life devoted to its practice?  In this course, we will address these questions and more by exploring craft practice as a means of discovery.  We will begin by considering (and practicing!) writing as a craft.  Then we’ll look historically at the role of craft in society, including ceramics, metalsmithing, and carpentry.  Next, we’ll engage in a collective craft project.  Finally, students will interview and observe craft professionals living in the area.  Throughout the semester, we will hone our craft of expression through consistent drafting, revision, and refinement of essays.  This class aims to blend thinking and making for a deeper understanding of the value of working with one's hands.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

Detours

(a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)