Academics Navigation

Courses

Get a feel for the exciting variety of courses taught at Marlboro.

Generally speaking, each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned. Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required. Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

American Studies

Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Kathryn Ratcliff
HUM1077
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Designated Writing

This course traces the emergence and development of a consumer oriented culture in the United States from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore the relationship between consumer culture and democracy, between places of consumption and places of production (leisure and work), between consumer goods and activities and issues of social identity, particularly relating to gender, class and race. We will also pay attention to movements and organizations which have resisted or challenged aspects of a dominant consumer culture. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the history of consumer culture in its related economic, political, social and cultural dimensions and an ability to read critically the messages and structures of contemporary consumer society. The class is designed to allow students to pursue particular research interests throughout the semester.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42

For American Studies offerings, also see:

Social Movements in the U.S.

Anthropology

On the Wings of Ethno/Graphic Storytelling
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Nelli Sargsyan
SSC724
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Global Perspective

McGranahan (2015) suggests that anthropology is an ethnographically-based theoretical storytelling. But ethnography has now traveled broadly to a variety of disciplines, both as a research methodology and an accounting of research, engaged in various worldmakings (Muñoz 1999). In our examination of ethnographic craft and story we will fly into a variety of multi-disciplinary ethnographies and (auto)ethnographies (experimental, visual, sensory, and feminist activist) in different sociopolitical cultural and historic contexts. Whose (fantastical, sensational, and magical) everyday worlds do ethnographers create in their storytelling? What are the creative building blocks of these worlds in terms of narrative form, (use of) research data, and the position(s) of the ethnographer(s)? How are ethnographers engaging with the power dynamic between themselves as researchers and their research participants? Are they creating non-hierarchical and non-exploitative ways of working and writing (Gordon-Ugarte 2015)? What kinds of worlds emerge through their storytelling? These are some of the questions we will examine as we fly into the different worlds to which we listen, about which we read and watch to consider for our own craft and to expand our worldview.

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

You are the Sick One: On Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Nelli Sargsyan
SSC723
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Global Perspective

People understand health, illness, and healing processes differently based on their cultural knowledge and experiences in places where they live. To gain a richer understanding of the different ways health, wellbeing, illness, and healing are conceptualized and experienced cross-culturally, we will examine them in relation to various systems of healing and medical practices in different sociocultural contexts. After examining how sociopolitical and cultural understandings and practices affect human health and how technologies change our biocultural and social practices over time, we will look into the ways in which different diseases and epidemics point to an uneven distribution of power and resources across time and space. Drawing on multi-genre scholarship (graphic and textual scholarly works, films, and podcasts) we will enter our cross-cultural examination of these issues from ethnographically-grounded anthropological perspectives that point to the complex ways in which biological, environmental, cultural, political, and economic processes intersect creating different (often unequal) experiences of health and wellbeing. 

Additional Fee:$0

  • Prerequisite: An introductory course in social sciences or permission of instructor
  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

For Anthropology offerings, also see:

Research Methods

Art History

History of Photography
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Nicholas Meyer
ART2698
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Starting before the first invention of a photographic process and traveling through the 200 years following;. this history of photography course will focus on the evolution of photography. From the very first chemical process to contemporary trends in the art world. In addition to the classic readings, lectures, quizzes and papers usually found within an art history class, we will also be doing hands on demonstrations of outdated alternative practices and immersive projects delving into the contemporary concerns of photography and modern imagery.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

Introduction to the History of Art Part II: The Modern World
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Felicity Ratte
HUM2569
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Global Perspective

This course, like Part I that precedes it is designed to introduce students to the discipline of art history and to the curriculum as it is taught at Marlboro College. We will continue to work on the key skills that art historians use: critical visual (and historical) analysis, critical reading and clear, analytic writing. Students will develop these skills through a variety of exercises, including museum visits, in-class presentations and written assignments. As the class progresses we will study the history of architecture and urban design, painting and sculpture through the multiple lenses of patronage, ritual practice, state control and social experience, among others. The art and architectural works covered in the class date from the fifteenth century to the contemporary era and range across the globe from the Middle East to the United States.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

For Art History offerings, also see:

The Art of Describing: From visual to text

Asian Studies

Modern Chinese History & Culture
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Seth Harter
HUM1075
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Designated Writing
Global Perspective

A continuation of “Ancient Chinese History and Culture,” this course will examine the major trends in Chinese history from the 17th century to the present. Along the way we will consider phenomenal expansion of China's territory, population, and economy under the Manchu Qing dynasty. We will then explore the onslaught of rebellion, reform, and revolution that put an end to the imperial system. We will consider the environmental consequences of economic development and political turmoil.  Finally, we will study the radical communism of Mao Zedong and conclude by looking at the challenges facing China today. Throughout the semester we will focus on the changing forms of political power and their implications for empowerment and accountability.

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D21
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D21

Biochemistry

Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Todd Smith
NSC415
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Scientists' ability to study, understand and manipulate DNA has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. In this course we will explore the structure of nucleic acids and the organization of genes and chromosomes. We will also examine DNA "packaging" and replication, the roles of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis and the control of gene expression. A major theme of this course will be how experimental evidence supports our current understanding of the structure and function of genes. This course will include discussions of how these processes can be manipulated to yield powerful laboratory techniques for the study of the organization, regulation and function of genes and gene products. The central structure of the course will be discussions based on selected readings, including journal articles, and in-class projects. We will also discuss homework assignments, and both of sets of discussions will be informed by readings from the text.

  • Biochemistry of the Cell
  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Todd Smith
NSC420
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Put on your safari shirt and pith helmet because we’re going hunting...for DNA sequences. We’ll use a technique called DNA barcoding to identify a range of organisms on the Marlboro campus. For example, what species of bacteria are in the soil around the college? Are there any coyotes around? To answer these questions students will learn a variety of basic molecular biology techniques, including DNA purification and quantification. Students will also build thermal cyclers for performing more advanced techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an important step in DNA barcoding. Students will also learn basic concepts and techniques in bioinformatics and use these tools to analyze DNA sequence data.  

  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

For Biochemistry offerings, also see:

Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab

Biology

General Biology II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Jaime Tanner
NSC291
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General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function and ecology.

  • General Biology I or permission of instructor
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221

Plant Reproductive Biology
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
NSC565
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Sexual reproduction in flowering plants involves a complex series of processes. How is pollen transferred among plants? How do seed and fruit production occur? How are seeds and fruits dispersed? How do seeds germinate and seedlings become established to begin the next generation of plants? We will explore physiological, ecological and evolutionary dimensions of these questions. Examples will include a diversity of plant taxa in ecosystems throughout the world, and we will engage in greenhouse and fieldwork projects.

  • General Biology or permission of instructor
  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

For Biology offerings, also see:

Life in the Land of Fire and Ice

Ceramics

Ceramics II (BUHS)
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
ART2695
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Open to Grades: 10-12Prerequisites: Ceramics I with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.Advanced ceramics offers motivated students the opportunity to further their wheel throwing and hand building skills. Students are largely independent and contract for their grade. With attention to proportion and sculptural form, students use historical and cultural examples to deepen their understanding of the medium. In addition, students study and practice glazing using historical and contemportary references. Alternate firing methods such as smoke and sagger fires are also explored. An applied research project, weekly readings from ceramics and sculpture journals, and site visits to local studios are an important part of the class. A lab fee of $10 is required. 

Focus on the Essential: The Bowl
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
ART2707
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Global Perspective

The Bowl.  The most essential form in the potter's lexicon, and one of the greatest assets to the development of civilization.  While this may seem grandiose, the Bowl is a form that is a study in subtleties and nuance.  This class will investigate every aspect of the Bowl, from foot to rim, while incorporating both functional and expressive qualities into our finished work.  Our aim: to sharpen our concepts through attention, consideration, repetition, and articulation.  The Bowl will be a stand-in for further exploration of the ceramic arts, and this class will study historic and present-day examples of vessels from around the world.This class will teach both wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques.  No experience required, and all levels welcome.

Additional Fee:$120

  • Wednesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

To Contain and Deliver: Wheel Throwing
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
ART2706
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Global Perspective

This class will have one functional object at the center of our orbit -- The Pouring Vessel.  Pitchers, ewers, creamers, coffee pots, teapots, and more will all be explored.  At first, we will develop the skills and techniques required to create unique vessels.  From there, we will use particular examples of containers from history to build an understanding of the social context in which they developed.  Using objects as a window into the past, the class will culminate in the students' application of their skills to create pouring vessels that reflect the character of our times.The class will focus on wheel throwing, with a variety of altering techniques included.

Additional Fee:$120

  • Wheel throwing experience helpful, but not required
  • Tuesday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
  • Friday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

Chemistry

General Chemistry II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Todd Smith
NSC505
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The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this introductory chemistry course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of thermodynamics, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. We will start each chapter with a discussion of selected topics, followed by in-class projects, problem-solving sessions and homework review.

  • General Chemistry I (NSC158)
  • NSC506
  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

For Chemistry offerings, also see:

Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab

Classics

Introductory Greek
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Henner Petin
HUM2575
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This course is for any students interested in making a first start on the classical Greek language. By the end of the semester, the course wants to enable students to read, in adaptation, some key passages from the classics of Greek literature. The first steps in learning an ancient language are always enormously rewarding, because along with their language, we also gain some fascinating insights into the way in which a now-lost civilisation thought and lived. There will be a written exam at the end of the semester to ensure good knowledge of basic grammar and vocabulary. We are using a textbook called "Athenaze".

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Introductory Greek II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Henner Petin
HUM2578
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This course is designed for those who have already completed a semester of Greek, but have not yet reached the proficiency in grammar and vocabulary for reading unadapted Latin. We will aim to complete "Athenaze", wherefore students are expected to have a good understanding of the basic principles of syntax and morphology, as well as being able to independently study vocabulary and grammar. As in the introductory course, there will be a written exam at the end of the semester. 

  • Introductory Greek
  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Introductory Latin
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Henner Petin
HUM2576
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This course is for any students interested in making a first start on the Latin language. By the end of the semester, the course wants to enable students to read, in adaptation, some key passages from the classics of Latin literature. The first steps in learning an ancient language are always enormously rewarding, because along with their language, we also gain some fascinating insights into the way in which a now-lost civilisation thought and lived.There will be a written exam at the end of the semester to ensure good knowledge of basic grammar and vocabulary. We will use a textbook called "Wheelock's Latin".

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Introductory Latin II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Henner Petin
HUM2577
View

This course is designed for those who have already completed a semester of Latin, but have not yet reached the proficiency in grammar and vocabulary for reading unadapted Latin. We will aim to complete "Wheelock's Latin", wherefore students are expected to have a good understanding of the basic principles of syntax and morphology, as well as being able to independently study vocabulary and grammar. As in the introductory course, there will be a written exam at the end of the semester. 

  • Introductory Latin
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Reading Greek
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2020
Henner Petin
HUM2585
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This course is for students who have reached sufficient proficiency in the language to read unadapted Greek texts from prose or verse. The precise texts to be read - and therefore the level of difficulty - will be decided by students and the instructor together, in order to make the course as beneficial as possible for each individual student. There will be a written exam on the text(s) covered at the end of the semester. 

  • Prior experience of reading Greek
  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Reading Latin
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2020
Henner Petin
HUM2586
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This course is for students who have reached sufficient proficiency in the language to read unadapted Latin texts from prose or verse. The precise texts to be read - and therefore the level of difficulty - will be decided by students and the instructor together, in order to make the course as beneficial as possible for each individual student. There will be a written exam on the text(s) covered at the end of the semester. 

  • Prior experience of reading Latin
  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

For Classics offerings, also see:

Spectres of Athens: Democracy and its Discontents

Computer Science

Data Science
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Jim Mahoney
NSC709
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Data science combines data analysis, computing, and numerical methods to analyze and understand large collections of numbers from all sorts of sources. It's been gaining popularity lately as a paradigm for interpreting everything from movie recommendations to image recognition. Using the Python programming language, this course will explore the basics of data science through statistics, numerical visualization, and machine learning.

  • Previous programming experience and some facility with math.
  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Internet Security Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Jim Mahoney
NSC710
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A project based mixed level seminar looking at various internet technologies and practices, focusing on their cybersecurity implications. Students will research and present topics both individually and in groups, including networking, protocols, front and back end web development, as well as related system administration issues. Recommended for those CS students doing internet related work. This course may be repeated for credit.

  • Previous programming experience.
  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Creative Writing

Art as Inquiry: Writing Lyric Essays and Poems That Ask Questions
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Bronwen Tate
ART2701
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This workshop course explores the liminal space where essay and poem meet. We’ll discuss and imitate essays by writers like Anne Carson and Kate Colby that play with form and sound—at times prioritizing the poetic functions of language over the delivery of information—and we’ll examine and model poems by writers including Maggie Nelson and Tyehimba Jess that test theories, compose knowledge, and grapple with archival research. Throughout the course, students will read and write hybrid texts that invent new ways to dwell with questions and create immersive reading experiences.  

This course is capped at 12 and offers priority to Plan students working in creative writing. Pre-registration does not guarantee enrollment. Students must attend the first class to confirm interest, at which point a list (and, if necessary, a wait-list ) will be determined. 

  • A previous workshop-based course
  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

For Creative Writing offerings, also see:

Self Scripting and Solo Perfromance Class
Writing and the Teaching of Writing

Cultural History

Global Migrations: Culture, Ecology, Politics
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
CDS640
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Global Perspective

Migration is a part of the history of numerous species from human beings to other animals and plants.  These large and small scale movements can be essential to the survival and success of the species. Ancient human migrations across continents, the movement of large herbivores across the Serengeti in Eastern Africa, the journey of monarch butterflies from New England to Mexico, and the establishment of a plant species from a windborne seed are but some examples. Many migrations of human groups are the products of colonization, conflict, and uneven globalization; they result in human suffering but also in significant social and cultural transformations. Migrations of some non-human species, invasive species in particular, can result in disruption of ecosystems, yet sometimes humans use translocation as a conservation strategy. In this cross-disciplinary course, we will explore the complex nature and impact of global migrations through cultural, ecological, and political lenses.  We will focus on contemporary questions around migration, with some historical background on both human and non-human migration. We'll consider such topics as borderlands as cultural and ecological spaces, impact of colonization and climate change on population movements, movement of people and their foods, and processes of hybridity/resilience/transformation that are integral to migration, keeping in mind the intersectionality of human and non-human migrations.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

For Cultural History offerings, also see:

The Practice of Emptiness in Buddhism & Islam

Dance

Afro-Cuban Dance
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Miguel Periche
ART2699
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Global Perspective

This class will explore dance from Afro-Cuban traditions, such as Yoruba, Congo, Palo, rumba, carnival, son and more. The class will be taught by Miguel Periche from Holguín, Cuba, who was born into a family deeply rooted in Afro-Cuban music and dance. In Cuba he was lead dancer in Conjunto Folklórico Okú, performing throughout eastern Cuba. Since coming to the United States in 2001, Miguel has been featured with SonRisa Dance in New York City and Gaia Roots. He later became Artistic Director of Iroko Nuevo, and Afro-Cuban performance group based in Western Massachusetts.  The class will be accompanied by live music.

  • Wednesday 6:30pm-7:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

Contact Improvisation
(2.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Kristin Horrigan
ART537
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Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying and find access to our own strength and sensitivity. Prerequisite: None

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
  • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

Dance As Social Action
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Kristin Horrigan
ART911
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This course examines the intersection of dance and social/political activism. How can dance participate in addressing social issues? How has it done so in the past? When does dance actually spark social change? We will examine dances that bring communities together for change, dances that address social and political themes on stage, dances that protest in the street, dance companies that challenge the politics of who gets to dance, and more. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include guest artists, creative work, fieldtrips, and a research paper.

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104

Environmental Studies

Life in the Cold
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Jaime Tanner
NSC640
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In this introduction to winter ecology we will explore how our local environment changes throughout the winter and how life adapts, endures and survives to meet the challenges that the cold season brings. Skills covered will include winter tree ID, snow tracking and animal signs, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, building snow structures, exploring the structure of snow, mammal and bird ID and sugaring. We will be outside a lot. Prerequisite: None

  • Monday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Life in the Land of Fire and Ice
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2020
NSC711
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Global Perspective

This one credit add-on course to Life in the Cold will provide a comparative exploration of winter ecology in Iceland over spring break. The arctic is changing more quickly than any other place on the planet due to climate change with dramatic changes in sea ice and snow cover. Additionally Iceland’s approach to reducing carbon emissions by utilizing sustainable energy sources and recycling carbon has been exemplary. During this semester long course we will spend one hour per week discussing the topics below to prepare us for the trip. We will explore glaciers, visit museums and research centers and visit one or more sustainable energy plants while in country. When we return we will reflect on the experience and on the similarities and differences the influence of winter on life in both Vermont and Iceland.

Outdoor Leadership
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Nikolas Katrick
CDS625
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An outdoor leader is a figure of balance.  They are responsible for facilitating group cohesion, overseeing logistical needs, working harmoniously in the natural world, responding to emergencies, and creating opportunities for reflection, learning, and sometimes, transformation.  Designed for the emerging leader, this course delves into both internal and external topics, starting with self-awareness and self-management, and moving into group awareness, group management, and risk management.  We will employ multiple learning styles, using discussion, reading, activity, and reflection to learn critical topics.  Each student will be expected to lead their own event, activity, or program during the semester to challenge and reflect upon their leadership skills.  We will also have one overnight trip during the course to address group dynamics hands-on.  This course is strongly recommended for, but not exclusive to, Bridges Leaders.

  • Wednesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Apple Tree

Postcolonial Environments
(2.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Rituparna Mitra
HUM2582
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Global Perspective

This is a 2-credit course that will meet once a week and read thoretical and critical writings on Postcolonial Ecocriticism.

  • Introductory classes in postcolonial or global literatures
  • Wednesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective
General Biology II
Global Migrations: Culture, Ecology, Politics
History Research with Scientific Methods

Film/Video Studies

Intermediate & Advanced Film / Video Plan Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Brad Heck
ART2648
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This course is designed for intermediate and advanced level students in the visual arts. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works-in-progress. Students at the intermediate level will be given three-week-long project prompts and technical demonstrations. Those on or about to be on Plan will select one body of work to focus on throughout the course. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not directly related to film/video studies, but is intended to relate to their film/video work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of a body of work and Plan Projects. 

Additional Fee:$120

  • An introductory video production course at the college level or by permission of instructor.
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art

The Art of the Mini-Documentary
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Brad Heck
ART2409
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This course investigates short-form documentary filmmaking. With the help of NY Times Op Docs, Aeon, and Vimeo mini-docs (among many other platforms), mini-docs are now gaining a greater audience and therefore more support. Mini-Docs are becoming an increasingly popular way to artistically and effectively document and share stories that don’t necessarily fit into the traditional longer feature-length form. Throughout the semester this class will focus on the skills and techniques of documentary filmmaking specific to the mini-doc, as well as viewing and discussing critically acclaimed mini-docs. This workshop-based course will study the aspects of producing a mini-doc from concept to completion: how to pitch your project; write a treatment; acquire release forms; research and best conduct an interview; match b-roll to your subject and shoot and light a formal interview; capture good audio; and basic editing skills.

Additional Fee:$120

  • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art

For Film/Video Studies offerings, also see:

Philosophy and Film: Self, Being-Double, Becoming-Other

Gender Studies

For Gender Studies offerings, also see:

Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective
What Moves at the Margin: Reading Contemporary American Women Writers

History

History Research with Scientific Methods
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
HUM2573
View

How has genetics influenced the study of the Black Death?  How have ice cores and dendrochronology helped revise our understanding of the end of the Roman Empire?  What does data analysis and visualization have to do with literature and readers in the seventeenth century?   History as a discipline has always incorporated new tools, theories, and techniques to better understand the human past.  Recent historical work has drawn on many new scientific techniques and computer-driven data analysis to better understand a wide variety of historical questions.  The units of the course will focus on prominent examples of this sort of work including all of the questions listed above.  For each unit this course will also have an invited professor to help us understand the scientific side of the work, as well as how history has influenced development in the sciences (visitors will include Todd Smith, Jenny Ramstetter, and others).  Finally, students will also have the opportunity to work on continuing research projects that employ a mix of data analysis and mapping techniques to study mobility and communication in late medieval Europe through the Travelers Lab at Wesleyan University.  Because most of the research projects we will study are collaborative in nature, it is strongly encouraged that both humanities students without a science background and scientists or data analysts without historical background enroll in the course - it is an opportunity to learn from each other.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

For History offerings, also see:

Introduction to the History of Art Part II: The Modern World
Modern Chinese History & Culture
Origins of the Contemporary World

Languages

Elementary Spanish II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
HUM1439
View
Global Perspective

Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I.  Prerequisite: One semester of Spanish or some prior Spanish

  • Elementary Spanish I or equivalent
  • A semester of college Spanish
  • Instructor's permission
  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13

Intermediate French II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
HUM2580
View

Intermediate French II is the continuation of a second-year French course for students who have successfully completed one year of elementary French or its equivalent. Students will continue to develop their language skills and cultural competency through study of vocabulary, grammar, literary and cultural texts. Students will contribute to the classroom community by using French in and out of class, collaborating with classmates, and taking responsibility for timely completion of all homework assignments, quizzes, compositions, projects, and tests. 

  • Grade of C- or better in Intermediate French I, or equivalent.
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102

Intermediate Spanish II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
HUM1403
View
Global Perspective

Intermediate Spanish II builds on and expands the language skills acquired in Intermediate Spanish. It combines an extensive grammar review while focusing on all relevant language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Culture is integrated in all aspects of the program; therefore, we will have critical discussions about the culture of different countries of the Spanish speaking world. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. It meets three times a week as a class and an extra 50 minutes section with a language assistant, to be arranged. Intermediate Spanish II is a course for students who have completed Intermediate Spanish or have been deemed to be proficient enough for this class after taking an introductory Spanish placement test and talking to the professor about prior course work. If you are taking Spanish for the first time at Marlboro College, you need to talk to the professor. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college Spanish or equivalent.

  • A year of college level Spanish or equivalent
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13

For Languages offerings, also see:

Introductory Greek
Introductory Greek II
Introductory Latin
Introductory Latin II
Reading Greek
Reading Latin

Liberal Studies

Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
CDS567
View

This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism and others. This course can compliment any year of course work. Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses; it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

  • None
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Rice-Aron Library/LIBBAR

For Liberal Studies offerings, also see:

Elementary Spanish II
Intermediate Spanish II
Staging the Apocalypse

Literature

What Moves at the Margin: Reading Contemporary American Women Writers
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Gloria Biamonte
HUM2572
View

’The proper stuff of fiction’ does not exist,” wrote Virginia Woolf in 1925, “everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss.”  The contemporary writers we will be reading in this course – a rather open-ended exploration of American women writers from the 1980s to the present – would agree with Woolf.  Exploring the richly diverse, original, and, at times, radically experimental narratives that evolve– sometimes quietly, other times filled with rage, almost always with longing, and, at moments, with deep love -- we will consider the writers’ attempts to respond to the social, economic and political events that shaped their lives. Though our focus will be on the novel, we will also be reading poetry and nonfiction.  Close textual readings will help us to examine the subtleties of character interactions, the weaving together of multiple storylines, and the inventive narrative devices that each writer uses in creating their stories. And we will ask: how do these authors create a space for the reader to enter— a space where understanding and empathy can grow?  Authors may include: Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Jennifer Egan, Jesmyn Ward, Linda Hogan, Maxine Hong Kingston, Adrienne Rich, Ming Holden, Anna Deavers Smith, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha. Pre-requisite: Must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement. 

  • Friday 1:30pm-3:15pm in Dalrymple/D42

For Literature offerings, also see:

Art as Inquiry: Writing Lyric Essays and Poems That Ask Questions
First You Write a Sentence: A Writing Workshop
Postcolonial Environments
Representations of 9/11 in Literature and Film
Staging the Apocalypse

Mathematics

Calculus II
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Matthew Ollis
NSC212
View

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus (NSC515). Topics include techniques and applications of integration, complex numbers, power series, parametric equations and differential equations.

  • Calculus or permission of instructor
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Differential Equations
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Onur Agirseven
NSC712
View

Differential equations is the mathematics of changing systems. It has wide-ranging applications, including biology, physics, and economics. This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations, with an emphasis on finding and applying techniques to solve first-order and linear higher-order differential equations.

  • Calculus II
  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216

Statistics
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Matthew Ollis
NSC123
View

Statistics is the science--and art--of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics as commonly used in the natural and social sciences. Topics include: probability theory, data collection, description, visualization, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression and analysis of variance. We will use the open source statistical computing package R (no prior computing experience is assumed).

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus
( Variable Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Onur Agirseven
NSC701
View

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into ten units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam or who just want to learn some math. Over the semester, three to four units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace.

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

For Mathematics offerings, also see:

Data Science

Music

Chamber Music
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Jake Charkey
ART2709
View

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string and brass instruments welcome. Course may be repeated for credit. 

  • Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

Hindustani Music
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Jake Charkey
ART2710
View

This is a practical introduction to one of the 2 dominant systems of music on the Indian sub-continent. Students will learn sargam (Indian solfe?ge system) and familiarize themselves with the raga system of melody as well as the tala system of rhythm. Course materials will include sung repertoire, melodic and rhythmic exercises, as well as close listening to recordings and some assigned reading.  Students who take this class do not need to have a music background but will be expected to sing melodic material and recite rhythms to the best of their ability.   The course can be designated a global perspectives course.

  • Thursday 9:30am-11:00am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

Jazz Workshop
(3.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Matan Rubinstein
ART2318
View

Jazz Workshop is a two tiered course. The first, taken for 2 credits, is a weekly meeting dedicated to learning of common jazz practices: improvising on chord changes, transcribing solos from recording, etc. The second, for an additional credit, will be a group meeting and additional weekly session rehearsing (and eventually performing) jazz standards and original compositions.

  • Music Fundamentals 1 or the equivalent music theory background
  • Permission of instructor required to register, and a separate audition required for the ensemble por

Madrigal Choir
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
ART2711
View

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit.Prerequisite: None; ability to read music helpful.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

Music From Nothing
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Andrew Greenwald
ART2708
View

Music From Nothing is a maker's course for everyone; from those who have never played an instrument or sung in public to those with extensive musical experience. We will explore the four aspects of music making – practice, interpretation, improvisation and composition – through a variety of means, including using our bodies for sound, performing on constructed and found instruments, interpreting and composing experimental text and graphic music scores and much more. Throughout the course we will attempt to address the questions that are at the core of the musical experience: how does music happen? Who decides if it did?  Where does music end and sound begin?

  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

Music Fundamentals II
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Matan Rubinstein
ART2331
View

This is the last of a course sequence designed as an intensive practical training for students interested in making music. The course will focus on improving our ability to hear, replicate, and document music. We will focus on sight singing, rhythmic skills, transcription, and utilizing these skills in our music making both in class and in our individual artistic practices outside the classroom. During the second part of the semester, we will also work on analysis and composition. The students will help guide the direction of the course by choosing particular musical examples and topics for transcription and analysis.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 151
  • Friday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 151

Painting

Painting and Drawing Plan Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2020
Amy Beecher
ART2705
View

This course is designed for students currently completing Plan work in the visual arts. We will half our meeting time critiquing student works in progress, and the other half completing one-on-one studio visits. Those on or about to be on Plan will select one body of work to focus on throughout the course. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely painting or drawing. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of exhibition. Prerequisite: Comprehensive work in drawing or painting at the college level or by permission of instructor.

Additional Fee:$100

  • Tuesday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Classroom
  • Friday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Classroom

For Painting offerings, also see:

Learning to See: Drawing Workshop

Philosophy

Philosophy and Film: Self, Being-Double, Becoming-Other
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Casey Ford
HUM2574
View

This course will explore the intersection between film as an aesthetic, expressive medium and philosophy as domain of concepts and ideas. Our study will be devoted to the study of philosophy and film, rather than merely philosophical theories of film itself. The theme of the course will be the nature of human identity, examining both the ways that the human self is constituted (conceptually and representationally) and the way in which identity is compromised by the experience of otherness (ecologically, interpersonally, existentially, etc.). Each week students will be asked to read selections from the history of philosophy on the self, identity, difference, and otherness, as well as to watch a series of films that engage with those ideas cinematically. The spirit of the course is that film itself is a profound mode of philosophical reflection, and that philosophical concepts themselves are greatly elucidated and enlivened by being thought through a different form of expression. The course will involve explanatory philosophical writing assignments, creative written exercises in philosophical-cinematic synthesis, and group film analysis. There we will be regular film viewing to be done independently of class, as well as public film screenings and discussions.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Spectres of Athens: Democracy and its Discontents
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Casey Ford and Henner Petin
HUM2571
View
Designated Writing
Global Perspective

This course will study the idea of democracy as a problem. It is typical to study something like democracy by defining the structure of its mode of governance and by distinguishing it from other possible models. In this course, we are interested in two different kinds of questions. First, in relation to what social and philosophical problems did the idea of democracy emerge and historically develop? Second, what problems are at the core of the idea and procedure of democracy itself that continue to evoke critiques, challenges, and interrogations of it? The course will divide its study between the democracy of Athens and contemporary world that inherited, and continues to be haunted by, that classical experiment. The phrase ‘Spectres of Athens’ addresses the ways in which this political system, initially regarded as highly radical and unusual, has lived on as an ideal model for contemporary political life.  However, returning to Athens as a political and historical reality, accessible through ancient sources of various kinds, affords us a new vantage point for reading the rich and often controversial afterlife of Athenian democracy. We suggest that spectres can be found from the Fall of the Bastille to the Paris riots, from the rise of totalitarianism to Occupy. Today, to speak in the name of “democracy” means being at once situated in a tradition rooted in a particular (and often imagined) moment in the ancient world, while also being oriented to an ethical ideal that has yet to be realized. Between the past, present, and future there is, we argue, a persistent conversation between ancient and contemporary ideas, a dialogue as critique. From the Classical tradition, we will closely study major philosophical texts devoted to the idea of democracy (Plato and Aristotle), historical work on its emergence in relation to tyranny and oligarchy (in Thucydides, Xenophon, and epigraphic evidence), and aesthetic representations of democratic problems (e.g. Aeschylus and Aristophanes). From the contemporary Western corpus we will read diverse critiques of democratic decision making (e.g. Schmitt, The Invisible Committee, Rancière), radicalizations of the democratic potential (e.g. Hardt & Negri, Mouffe), and philosophical reflections on democratic futures (e.g. Agamben, Derrida).

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

For Philosophy offerings, also see:

Art as Inquiry: Writing Lyric Essays and Poems That Ask Questions
Postcolonial Environments
The Practice of Emptiness in Buddhism & Islam

Photography

Introduction to Photography- Digital
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Nicholas Meyer
ART2697
View

this course introduces students to the digital workflow of contemporary photography. From learning how to use a Digital Single lens reflex camera to mastering editing techniques in Adobe Photoshop. Students learn the essential aspects of camera control and functionality leading to the production of a body of printed work. Though the lens of history and contemporary practice this course will Introduce the visual, critical, and technical issues of photography. 

  • none
  • Monday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-114
  • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-114

Photography III (BUHS)
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
John Willis
ART2696
View

Open to: 10-12Prerequisites Photography II with a grade of 75 or above or with department head approval.This course is designed for the passionate photography student. This student will be self-guided but will work in the structure of the Photography 2 class with much higher expectations in the quality of produced work and more advanced challenges will be given to Photo 3 students with each assigment. A weekly journal is required along with review of missed photographic opportunities. Emphasis will be placed on student developed independent work. An extensive portfolio of work is required for the culmination of the course. Some cameras are available on loan for student use, but it is strongly recommended that the student supply their own 35mm film camera and/or digital camera if possible. Student will be expected to pay a $10.00 lab fee at the beginning of the course. 

Physics

General Physics I
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Jim Mahoney
NSC708
View

An introductory physics class suitable for students considering a Plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion. This will be a calculus-based version. Our weekly meeting time may change depending on the participants.                                      

  • Mathematical proficiency up to and including calculus.
  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

For Physics offerings, also see:

Calculus II
Differential Equations

Politics

International Social Policy
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Ian McManus
SSC717
View
Global Perspective

This course offers a comparative overview of social policies in different areas of the world. The class will examine the roles that markets, international institutions, states, civil society, and families play in providing for the well-being of individuals overtime and across countries. It will discuss various analytical approaches to understanding social policy developments and outline some of the most pressing social challenges that societies face today. This includes globalization, aging populations, income inequality, migration, climate change, and workforce automation. The class is comprised of three sections. The first section will explore the emergence of modern welfare states in developed countries and recent challenges and trends in contemporary social policy across these states. The second section will focus on social policy in the developing world. The third and final section will analyze contemporary social policy challenges. Students will explore how social policy relates to development and examine the influence of international aid, international organizations, governments, and non-state actors on welfare development. The course will draw upon literature, theories, and methods from multiple disciplines including sociology, political science, world studies, economics, public policy, and development studies.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Research Methods
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Ian McManus
SSC718
View

This course provides an introduction to research methods often employed in the social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, sociology, economics, psychology, political science, and gender studies. We will cover a variety of methods, including surveys, interviews, observations and experiments. To help us understand the complex questions facing researchers more interactively we will actually do methods in this course. You will design and implement your projects in collaboration with your peers. Leaving this course, you will be prepared to conduct your own research project, aware of the elements that contribute to a well-crafted research design and ask astute questions about our social world.

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

For Politics offerings, also see:

Social Movements in the U.S.
Spectres of Athens: Democracy and its Discontents

Psychology

Perception of the Environment
(4.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2020
Thomas Toleno
SSC719
View

4This course will cover the theory behind defining perception physiologically or ecologically.  We will begin historically and end in modern neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W

Psychology of Literature
(3.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Thomas Toleno
SSC721
View

This course will compare Asimov's Foundations trilogy to Riddley Walker and a modern trilogy of Robert Charles Wilson on Spin.  Supplemented by a few short stories, the topics covered will include utopias, dystopias, and post-apocalyptic communities.  Each week will require a 350 word response, concluding in a 6-8 page final paper. The course will be co-sponsored by Sophie Gorjance.

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33W

Seminar on development
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Thomas Toleno
SSC720
View

The course expands on an introduction of child development by revisiting some original readings of Piaget, Vygotsky, & Spiegler.  Students will be responsible for additional topics presentations.

  • Monday 10:30am-11:50am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:50am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 10:30am-11:50am in Dalrymple/D33W

For Psychology offerings, also see:

Research Methods

Religion

Sources & Methods in Religious Studies
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
Amer Latif
HUM1117
View

An examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A

The Practice of Emptiness in Buddhism & Islam
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Amer Latif
HUM2583
View
Global Perspective

This course is an introduction to Buddhism and Islam, and the comparative study of religion. Despite apparent differences between non-theistic Buddhism and theistic Islam, there are deep structural and functional similarities between these religions. We will explore some of these similarities by examining the proposition that the driving forces of Muslim thought and practice are the Islamic analogues to Buddhist teachings on emptiness and no-self. We will draw on Islamic calligraphy, teachings of saints like Rumi, Qur’anic texts, and Islamic ritual to trace the place and function of emptiness and no-self in Muslim self-understanding.

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

For Religion offerings, also see:

First You Write a Sentence: A Writing Workshop

Sculpture

Material Dexterity
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
William Ransom
ART2702
View

This introductory Sculpture class is designed to introduce students to the world of object making.  To make sculpture is to learn the craft of orchestrating relationships of material and process with form and presentation.  It is to learn how a physical thing – an object - might suggest a feeling, embody an idea or elicit an intuition. As an introductory sculpture course, students will explore the basics of sculpture – scale, form, volume, gravity, structure, extension etc. We cover both additive and reductive processes and there will be an emphasis on the development of form and structure particular to each process. Students will articulate wire, shape clay, carve plaster and fabricate with wood. 

Additional Fee:$90

  • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
  • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

Ulmus As Witness
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
William Ransom
ART2704
View

This course is to be centered around the loss of the iconic elm tree (ulmus Americana) in front of the dining hall. As with any loss we are saddened, but here in this class we will celebrate the potential in what is left behind. There will be an abundance of material suddenly made available to us and it is not just any material. It is wood that has stood witness to the entire life of Marlboro College We will reflect on that history, on the present moment and where our hopes for the future through the lens of the wood from our own witness ulmus.

  • any sculpture class
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

Sociology

Social Movements in the U.S.
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
SSC684
View

The study of social movements is a vibrant and rapidly growing field in Sociology.  This course will introduce key models with which to understand a range of contentious actions.  We will draw from literature on mobilization around civil rights, environmentalism, gender equality, democratization, human rights, and global justice, among others.  Over the course of the semester we will analyze social movements in the U.S. to uncover the mechanisms of political contention such as resources, political opportunities, activist recruitment, frames, tactics, and repression. Readings from academic journals and books are paired with newspaper, internet, and social media accounts.

  • Introductory level work in the social sciences recommended
  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Sociology of Race and Media through Music
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
SSC722
View

 This courses uses popular music to explore the shifting racial landscape in the United States.From the chitin circuit to race records, blue-eyed soul and more, this course will uncover how music plays a role in sustaining and re-configuring stratification in our society. We will use sociological theories of race and ethnicity to better understand the social construction of race, patterns of segregation/integration and discrimination as well as collective identity, social boundaries and the power of cultural creation. We will also examine mass media production and distribution by looking at music studios, radio stations, TV, and social media. This intro- level course will allow students to become familiar with sociological theories, methods, and modes of analysis.

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

For Sociology offerings, also see:

International Social Policy
Research Methods

Theater

Self Scripting and Solo Perfromance Class
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Normi Noel
ART2700
View

This class will focus on creating monologues and short pieces of work for both actors and and non actors, writers and non writers, as well as what it means to perform personal work, and the work of others in the group.  The imagination responds to play, and we will use personal story telling, free writing, dreams, and simple actor training skills, which include some basic voice and physical movement.  The development of the ensemble can restore a powerful acoustic for the creative and intuitive inner voice, as well as providing a rich exploration of the actor/audience relationship.  Personal narrative is where theater has its roots, and remains a radical voice in the 21st Century taboos and defenses, as well as a restorative cultural tool for healing and change.

  • None
  • Friday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Seminar in Performance: Plan Productions
( Variable Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Brenda Foley
ART2649
View

This course offers students the opportunity to engage in the theatrical process through participation in a student directed production. Auditions and casting will take place at the beginning of the semester and rehearsal dates and times will be scheduled following casting. The course is for variable credits and open to students interested in all aspects of production: acting, design, stage managing, costumes, light, sound, and props. No previous experience is required to participate.

  • Audition and/or permission of instructor
  • Wednesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Staging the Apocalypse
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Brenda Foley
ART927
View
Global Perspective

In this course we will explore the ways in which contemporary playwrights portray a vision of the secular apocalyptic. As with Vaçlav Havel's assessment of Absurdism, apocalyptic plays can be read as "not scenes from life, but theatrical images of the basic modalities of humanity in a state of collapse."  We'll take an expansive perspective on the definition of "apocalyptic" and use as a frame works such as Margaret Atwood's novel Oryx and Crake, the poetry of Japanese women following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in White Flash/Black Rain, and plays such as The Effect, Far Away, and Ditch. Prerequisite: None

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112

To Be Determined

CDS College for Social Innovation: Semester in the City Internship
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
CDS645
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All Social Innovation Fellows will spend approximately 30 hours per week working at a nonprofit, a government agency or a social mission business. CSI will make the best possible match for each student based on an issue interest, skills and knowledge (existing and desired). Host organizations will provide Fellows with a high-level draft fellowship plan that includes the following components, and the designated mentor will provide input to the Fellow's course grade. 

CDS639 College for Social Innovation: Becoming a Problem Solver
(8.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
CDS646
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College for Social Innovation aims to educate and inspire the next generation of problem solvers for humanity's tough challenges. At a macro level, we hope that Social Innovation Fellows will go on to do good in the world in a way that best fits your temperament, strengths and passions. At a micro level BaPS - in combination with the Social Innovator's Toolbox and the daily work at your internships - will help you develop four Power Tools and two essential Daily Practices that will improve your ability to solve problems big and small.

College for Social Innovation Seminar
(4.00 Credits — Intermediate)

Spring 2020
CDS644
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This course will expose students to the concepts and practices associated with social innovation and social entrepreneurship - i.e., the development and growth of new, sustainable, and scalable approaches to the major social, economic, and environmental challenges facing society. Students will learn a variety of tools and methods used for the development, implementation, management, and assessment of social solutions that they will be able to use over the course of their careers.

Visual Arts

Art Seminar Critique
(2.00 Credits — Advanced)

Spring 2020
Amy Beecher
ART359
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This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. Additionally, studentw will focus on developing a CV and other materials for grant and exhibition applications. This is a required course for seniors on Plan in the Visual Arts. The class meets Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:20 except the days there will be visiting artists when the meeting time is 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

  • Preliminary or Final Plan Application on file or by instructors permission
  • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

Learning to See: Drawing Workshop
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Amy Beecher
ART2703
View

Educator Kimon Nicolaides wrote that "learning to draw is really a matter of learning to see - to see correctly - and that means a good deal more than merely looking with the eye." In this multi-level drawing workshop, we will focus on drawing from observation, reframing the act of looking as a multi-sensory investigation. We will start the semester experimenting with drawing tools as we respond to sound and touch. After having honed our senses, we will draw from primarily visual information, incorporating this more experimental approach into traditional explorations such as still life and portraiture. Through the completion of structured assignments, beginning students will achieve fluency in western approaches to naturalism, as well as an understanding of the principles and elements of two-dimensional graphic art. Intermediate and advanced students will respond to broader prompts as they refine their existing skills, ultimately developing a practice of drawing that supports work in Plan.

Additional Fee:$100

  • Permission of the instructor
  • Diagnostic still life assignment for intermediate and advanced students
  • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-201
  • Friday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-201

For Visual Arts offerings, also see:

Painting and Drawing Plan Seminar

World Studies Program

Finding an Internship
(1.00 Credit — Introductory)

Spring 2020
WSP50
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Global Perspective

While in this class, students will be asked to reflect on their personal and professional skills, values, interest and goals in order to prepare themselves to identify and pursue an internship or job that will be meaningful to them. Students will explore and identify themselves as an individual, as a member of a shared culture, and within the context of a foreign culture, as it relates to skills needed to succeed professionally and personally while crossing cultures. Expected outcomes of the course are a professional resume and cover letter, improved networking and interview skills and proposal writing preparation, as well as strategies for dealing with culture shock and professional differences in a multicultural workplace. This course is applicable to non-WSP students as well.The course consists of 10 classes, which each meet for 1.5 hours.

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

Origins of the Contemporary World
(4.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Seth Harter
WSP73
View
Global Perspective

The class is designed to help students situate themselves in time and place, and to begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically.  Over the course of the semester, we will chart the tumultuous progression of the 20th-century’s ‘isms:  colonialism, capitalism, communism, fascism, feminism, and environmentalism.  Each student will write a contemporary history of a topic of their choosing and present a profile of a winner of the Nobel peace prize. The course is required for World Studies Program (WSP) students.  It also welcomes non-WSP students, and those curious about joining WSP. Prerequisite: None

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D21

For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

International Social Policy

Writing

First You Write a Sentence: A Writing Workshop
(2.00 Credits — Introductory)

Spring 2020
Amer Latif
HUM2584
View

This course focuses on the basic unit of writing, the sentence. Too often, the pressure of deadlines and the sheer volume of work impedes the kind of revision that makes a sentence sing. This course is an opportunity to practice the craft of writing clear sentences. In the words of Joe Moran, together we will practice “how to bring a sentence to life, but not too much; how to say wondrous things with plain words; how to write long and legato without running out of breath; and, how to join sentences together with invisible thread.”

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Representations of 9/11 in Literature and Film
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Rituparna Mitra
HUM2581
View
Writing Seminar
Global Perspective

This course will examine the ways in which 9/11 and its aftermath have defined US and Global cultural expression. Using novels, comic books, essays, and films, we will cover a range of representations including Art Spiegelman's book of comics In the Shadow of No Towers which was an immediate response to the trauma of 9/11, as well as later works such as Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2008),  Amy Waldman's The Submission (2011) and Mohammed Hanif's Red Birds (2018) that evoke the geo-politics of 9/11 and open up the event to shared and contested global and historical perspectives. This course will run as a writing seminar where the writing process (pre-writing, drafts, peer review, and revisions) will be privileged. Students will also learn to close-read texts and construct well-developed arguments. A fundamental assumption of our seminar is that by improving one’s reading skills, one can improve their writing capabilities, and expand the resources a writer must draw on to compose any essay or argument. .

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Writing and the Teaching of Writing
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Bronwen Tate
HUM2579
View

What do we do when we write and how do we learn to do it? In this class, we ask not just “how do commas work?” but “how do writers get from a tangle of ideas and associations to a lucid piece of structured prose?” These questions will drive our inquiry into both the theory and the practice of teaching writing, and we will conduct that inquiry with an eye toward learning something not only about the teaching of writing, but also about our own writing processes. In brief, we will engage in what Linda Adler-Kassner and Elizabeth Wardle call “the study of composed knowledge.” Our inquiry will draw on discussions of process by experienced writers and writing teachers, style guides that attempt to identify excellent writing and describe how it is achieved, and evidence-based studies on writing and writing pedagogy. We will also look at writing as a social and rhetorical activity and consider ways writing pedagogy and ideas about “good writing” can be exclusive or inclusive of diverse learning styles and backgrounds. Assignments will include reflections on students’ own writing process and development as writers, analysis of how various writers and writing teachers approach their work, and hands-on practice in designing and presenting lessons and offering feedback on the writing of others. Successful completion of this course will make students eligible to apply for work as writing tutors.  This course is capped at 12 and offers priority to  students whose Plan work or projected Plan work relates to writing and/or pedagogy. Pre-registration does not guarantee enrollment. Students must attend the first class to confirm interest, at which point a list (and, if necessary, a wait-list ) will be determined. All participants in this course should be enrolled in at least one other course that requires frequent writing, since we will use your own writing as a basis for many of our in-class exercises. 

  • Passed Clear Writing Requirement
  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

For Writing offerings, also see:

Art as Inquiry: Writing Lyric Essays and Poems That Ask Questions
Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities

Writing Seminars

Representations of 9/11 in Literature and Film
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Rituparna Mitra
HUM2581
View
Writing Seminar
Global Perspective

This course will examine the ways in which 9/11 and its aftermath have defined US and Global cultural expression. Using novels, comic books, essays, and films, we will cover a range of representations including Art Spiegelman's book of comics In the Shadow of No Towers which was an immediate response to the trauma of 9/11, as well as later works such as Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2008),  Amy Waldman's The Submission (2011) and Mohammed Hanif's Red Birds (2018) that evoke the geo-politics of 9/11 and open up the event to shared and contested global and historical perspectives. This course will run as a writing seminar where the writing process (pre-writing, drafts, peer review, and revisions) will be privileged. Students will also learn to close-read texts and construct well-developed arguments. A fundamental assumption of our seminar is that by improving one’s reading skills, one can improve their writing capabilities, and expand the resources a writer must draw on to compose any essay or argument. .

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

The Art of Describing: From visual to text
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Felicity Ratte
HUM2570
View
Writing Seminar

Taking a visual image and turning it into words is, seemingly, an exercise in futility. If the thing represented could be conjured in words, then there would be no need for the image. We do this describing, however, all the time. This seminar takes on this basic conundrum through the practice of describing. What do we aim to do when we describe a visual image? What is the role that words play in our understanding and discussion of the visual? And finally, what do images show us that words cannot? We will read the work of art and cultural critics from the eighteenth-century to the present, as well as working daily on our own descriptive and analytic writing.   

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree

The Art of Describing: From visual to text
(4.00 Credits — Multi-Level)

Spring 2020
Felicity Ratte
HUM2570
View
Writing Seminar

Taking a visual image and turning it into words is, seemingly, an exercise in futility. If the thing represented could be conjured in words, then there would be no need for the image. We do this describing, however, all the time. This seminar takes on this basic conundrum through the practice of describing. What do we aim to do when we describe a visual image? What is the role that words play in our understanding and discussion of the visual? And finally, what do images show us that words cannot? We will read the work of art and cultural critics from the eighteenth-century to the present, as well as working daily on our own descriptive and analytic writing.   

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree

Detours

(a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)