MS in Management - Health Care Administration Courses

"I'm especially impressed with the real-world experience at Marlboro. The Capstone projects represent quality improvement at its best, with the advantage of excellent faculty consultation. Marlboro's graduate program has groomed several of our clinical managers to become more highly effective and influential leaders at the hospital. With the advent of "pay-for-performance" under national health care reform, Marlboro's professional faculty and strong foundational course-work prepare our students to grasp the current environment, accomplishing both clinical and financial outcomes, while building team-work and conflict resolution skills to manage major changes."
--Steven R. Gordon, President and CEO, Brattleboro Memorial Hospital

Course Descriptions

Health Care Administration

Required Courses

MBAS601 - Thriving in Teams and Organizations

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter

Thriving in Teams and Organizations addresses theory and practice of how individuals and groups act and interact in an organizational context with a focus on distributed and virtual teams. The course draws from research and theories in Organizational Behavior and Positive Psychology to shed light on such human dynamics as motivation, perception, decision-making, and conflict management. It addresses questions such as the following: What makes teams and organizations effective and sustainable? What are the challenges to effective teams and organizations? How can you understand your personal predilections as a team member and organizational player?

MBAS605.1 - Personal Leadership Development I

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Spring
  • Prerequisites: MBAS601 Thriving in Teams and Organizations

Personal Leadership Development is a sequence of four courses that explore ideas and approaches for the development of personal leadership--from personal mastery to the leadership of teams and larger organizations. In the context of reflecting and learning with peers and mentors, the course is organized around the creation of a self-directed personal leadership development plan, including goal and objective setting, progress monitoring, introspection, self-honesty, empowerment, and feedback skills. Students are encouraged to seek mentoring from individuals in sectors, industries, or roles they aspire to be part of or assume.

This first course in the sequence focuses on self-assessment and self-awareness in the personal leadership domain, personal ecology and sustainability, and the emotional intelligence leadership competencies. The prerequisite for this course is People and Teams, taught in Winter. This four-trimester course sequence begins in Spring trimester each year, and must be taken in order.

MBAS605.2 - Personal Leadership Development II

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Fall
  • Prerequisites: MBAS605.1 Personal Leadership Development I

The second of the four Personal Leadership Development courses explores the realm of self-management, including restorative, contemplative, and productive self-management practices. It also addresses the emotional intelligence leadership domain of self-management and the related competencies of emotional self-control and transparency, hope and optimism, and adaptability and achievement. This four-trimester course sequence begins in Spring term each year, and must be taken in order.

MBAS605.3 - Personal Leadership Development III

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Winter
  • Prerequisites: MBAS605.2 Personal Leadership Development II

The third of four Personal Leadership Development courses considers the emotional intelligence domain of social awareness and the related competencies of empathy and service to others, organizational awareness, and matching personal values to organizational strategies. It offers skill-building in coaching, listening, and communication techniques to use in challenging situations. This four-trimester course sequence begins in Spring each year, and must be taken in order.

MBAS621 - Introduction to Systems Thinking

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Spring

This course introduces the concepts and tools of systems thinking. Creating sustainability within organizations, businesses and the world requires paradigmatic shifts, and insights into how to effectively create change. Systems thinkers have shown that the effective levers of change are often counter-intuitive, or only become obvious when the mental model which structures them is revealed. This course uses diverse readings and models to develop competence and comfort with systems thinking analysis and prepare students for Applied Systems Thinking.

MHCA608 - Capstone I: Planning

  • 2 credits
  • Taught in Winter

Students enroll in Capstone I: Planning in their penultimate trimester. The course offers guidance and support as students plan their response to the problem or opportunity they have identified. Each student completes a project proposal in his or her own website with the support of others in the class, course faculty and their Program Director. Deliverables for this phase include: completion of a comprehensive project proposal document and the first two pages of students individual Capstone websites, and creation and delivery of an elevator pitch  a very brief statement that communicates their Capstone project.

Capstone involves both process and product. Students engage in the process of identifying a problem or opportunity, planning and carrying out a project, and reflecting on their learning. During the two-trimester process, students create products including a completed website, a project deliverable designed to solve the problem or address the opportunity, and an elevator pitch. There is a strong focus on ensuring an agile approach to planning and implementation and on clear, professional communication. Together process and product provide students with a deep learning experience during their last two trimesters at the Graduate School.

MHCA609 - Capstone II: Implementing

  • 4 credits
  • Taught in Winter, Spring
  • Prerequisites: MHCA608 Capstone I: Planning

Students enroll in Capstone II: Implementing in their final trimester and complete their Capstone project thereby completing a key degree requirement. Supported by an Advisor, students: create the deliverable planned in Capstone I; deliver a formal presentation of his/her project; participate in a conversation about what they have learned doing the Capstone and their course of study; and submit their completed Capstone website, which includes a written Project Summary and Retrospective on Learning. Students Capstones are assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Capstone involves both process and product. Students engage in the process of identifying a problem or opportunity, planning and carrying out a project, and reflecting on their learning. During the two-trimester process, students create products including a completed website, a project deliverable designed to solve the problem or address the opportunity, and an elevator pitch. There is a strong focus on ensuring an agile approach to planning and implementation and on clear, professional communication. Together process and product provide students with a deep learning experience during their last two trimesters at the Graduate School.

MHCA646 - Risk and Quality Management

  • 2 credits
  • Taught in Winter

This course provides students with an exposure to healthcare risk and quality management concepts. Students will explore how a systems approach to the development of a risk and quality management program is beneficial to the organization. They will understand how performance improvement methodologies and tools are supportive of minimizing the risk a healthcare organization faces. Students will explore current trends and issues associated with all aspects of a comprehensive risk management program including ethical risks, risk financing, risk reduction, and emergency preparedness.

MHCA647 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Healthcare

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring

The purpose of this course is to examine the background, foundation and ethical aspects of the United States legal system and the role of the legal and political environment as it affects the health care industry. Topics include: liability, negligence, taxation, antitrust, compliance and emergency care. This course will examine contemporary issues affecting the industry and local facilities.

MHCA649 - Financial Management

  • 3 credits

The goal of this course is to introduce financial decision-making and management techniques in a firm, including its relationship to financial markets and institutions. Topics include: balance sheet analysis, capital budgeting, working capital management, capital structure of the enterprise, business valuation and managing risk.

MHCA650 - Strategic Planning and Policy

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall

This course will examine the process of strategic planning. Organizations are undergoing a series of revolutionary changes, including vertical integration, horizontal consolidation, strategic alliances and joint ventures, entrepreneurial startups, and specialized niche networks. This course will critically examine changes and discuss the various strategic decisions and managerial skills needed to confront them in a variety of firms in organizations. The primary focus of the course is on the strategy of the business unit, which is the foundational level for competitive analysis, and an analysis of the issues central to the firm's short-term and long-term competitive success. Using a combination of case studies and industry field research, students will assume the roles of key decision-makers and/or advisors in analyzing these issues and offering recommendations for strategic change.

MHCA655 - Change Management

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter

This course prepares participants to lead change in an organizational setting. Topics of study include: contrasting climates and cultures in various organizational types; analyzing conditions that foster both acceptance and resistance to change; viewing change management through structural, personnel, political, and symbolic frames; assessing the needs and providing the means for professional development to accompany change; and specific leadership strategies for managing change. Participants will develop a change management plan for use in an organizational setting of their choice.

MSM602 - Foundations of Project Management

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall

In this introductory course, students learn the application of standard project management processes. Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), key topics include project selection and scoping, risk analysis, schedule and budget management, development of work breakdown structures, project communication and team building. Students are asked to plan a real-world project and to initiate project control processes as part of the class homework.

MSM635 - Clear Communications

  • 2 credits
  • Taught in Winter, Spring

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills required to be a successful communicator in today's global business world. The course draws from research and theories in Collaborative Leadership, Conflict Transformation and Authentic Communication to support relationship and trust building, collaboration, self-awareness, group awareness and appreciation. By the end of the course you will understand different communication models and tools and how to use them effectively in our fast-paced digital world. You will also develop cross cultural awareness, sensitivity and mediation skills. You will be able to more effectively communicate to and engage with stakeholders, lead and facilitate valuable meetings and presentations, develop creative solutions to challenges and maintain healthy mentor relationships.

Elective Courses

MAT613 - Leading Change

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring

After an instructional unit is created, it needs to be integrated into the organization for which it was made. This is a complex process, involving many layers of cultural change within an individual classroom, school district, campus or business. This course provides planning strategies for leaders of change. Topics of study include the political and economic ramifications of introducing new technology, strategies for change management, various organizational models, and the need for professional development.

MHCA670 - Capstone Extension

  • Variable credits

Register for this zero credit class to complete Capstone work.

MSM622 - Management Seminar

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Fall, Spring

Short topic courses covering various aspects of management.