MA in Teaching for Social Justice: Courses

Whether you start in the fall or winter trimester, the MATS program is a one-year, 36-credit program that includes an engaging classroom internship for the given year in a K-12 classroom. Meanwhile, during weekend intensives with your diverse peers you will explore pedagogy, education policy, literacy development, and strategies for all kinds of learners. The result is an intimate knowledge and experience of teaching in the context of social justice, and an engaged cohort of colleagues as your network to build on. Following are the curricula for starting both in the fall and the winter trimester, as well as a detailed list of courses.

Fall Program Start

Curriculum Total Fall Winter Spring
MATS650 Foundations of Education: Legacies, Culture and Teaching 3 3 credits    
MATS651 Theories of Human Development & Exceptionality 3 3 credits    
MATS652 Pedagogy of Social Justice Seminar 6 3 credits 3 credits  
MATS654 Curriculum & Assessment in Equity Education Seminar 6 3 credits 3 credits  
MATS656 Technology for Educators 1   1 credit  
MATS660 Internship: Teaching for Social Justice Seminar 6 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits
MATS662 Teaching Practices in the Content Area Seminar 6   3 credits 3 credits
MATS664 Applied Research in Equity Education 3     3 credits
MATS665 Portfolio 2     2 credits
TOTAL 36 14 12 10

Winter Program Start

Curriculum Total Winter Spring Fall
MATS650 Foundations of Education: Legacies, Culture and Teaching 3     3 credits
MATS651 Theories of Human Development & Exceptionality 3     3 credits
MATS652 Pedagogy of Social Justice Seminar 6 3 credits   3 credits
MATS654 Curriculum & Assessment in Equity Education Seminar 6 3 credits   3 credits
MATS656 Technology for Educators 1 1 credit    
MATS660 Internship: Teaching for Social Justice Seminar 6 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits
MATS662 Teaching Practices in the Content Area Seminar 6 3 credits 3 credits  
MATS664 Applied Research in Equity Education 3   3 credits  
MATS665 Portfolio 2     2 credits
TOTAL 36 12 8 16

MA in Teaching

Required Courses

EDU620 - Clear Writing Workshop

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Fall
  • This is a required course

Graduate level education demands writing skills that are well developed and adaptable. The Clear Writing Workshop will prepare learners to write at the graduate level. It will sharpen writing skills that have dulled, and elevate critical thinking.

The course begins with a subject matter review of the four basics and the four modes of writing. It progresses into a study and practice of critical reading, followed by writing analysis. Throughout the course, students will practice writing in a variety of styles; observational statements, essays, blog posts, emails, writing for the web, elevator pitches, and more. The course culminates in a writing project in the style and form of the student's choosing.

MAT603 - Web Design and Media Production

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall
  • This is a required course

A foundation course in the delivery of educationally oriented multimedia via the Internet. Students will use a best-of-breed content management system (WordPress) to practice the basic production of educationally oriented text, photos, video, audio and files for download. Students will study and discuss the history of the Internet, Web, current trends, usability, assistive technology, universal design and the analysis, ethics, and effective use of Internet media and software for educational purposes. The final project is the creation of a professional online electronic portfolio in a second authoring platform in Google Sites. E-portfolios are used throughout the EdTech program for final polished work. They are designed to be used after graduation to broadcast one's best work to potential employers and collaborators.

MAT605 - Digital Research Technologies

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • This is a required course

Educators need to develop effective Internet search strategies, academic writing skills, sound criteria for evaluating and analyzing Web sites and online publications, and experience in integrating Web-based research into classroom research methods. This course trains educators to efficiently and effectively search, evaluate and document digital educational resources. Students are guided through an investigation of multimodal, educational materials available online via the open web and library subscription resources. A series of small research projects, on the topic of the student's choice, will be used to build a body of research that culminates in a final paper and bibliography, which follows the submission guidelines of an appropriate academic journal.

MAT606 - Legal and Ethical Issues

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Spring
  • This is a required course

In this age of open access and unprecedented levels of connectivity, copyright, fair use, and intellectual property are still major issues  and even hurdles  we face, particularly in an educational setting. What do we as educators need to know as we go about pulling together course material? What do our students need to know as they complete research assignments? Topics will include legislation, guidelines, and best practices, and a variety of open access resources will be explored and evaluated.

MAT609 - Capstone I: Planning

  • 2 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Winter, Spring
  • This is a required course

Students enroll in Capstone I: Planning in their penultimate trimester. The course offers guidance and support as students plan their response to the problem or opportunity they have identified. Each student completes a project proposal in his or her own website with the support of others in the class, course faculty and their Program Director. Deliverables for this phase include: completion of a comprehensive project proposal document and the first two pages of students individual Capstone websites, and creation and delivery of an elevator pitch  a very brief statement that communicates their Capstone project.

Capstone involves both process and product. Students engage in the process of identifying a problem or opportunity, planning and carrying out a project, and reflecting on their learning. During the two-trimester process, students create products including a completed website, a project deliverable designed to solve the problem or address the opportunity, and an elevator pitch. There is a strong focus on ensuring an agile approach to planning and implementation and on clear, professional communication. Together process and product provide students with a deep learning experience during their last two trimesters at the Graduate School.

MAT610 - Educational Technology

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall
  • This is a required course

Students will study the theory and history of educational technology and instructional design. This will include topics such as instructional systems design (ISD), cognitive psychology, past and present learning theories, curriculum design, assessment, evaluation, and who the key people and organizations are in the industry. Students will develop their own style of instructional design and their own amalgam of learning theories and use it to design a basic instructional unit of their choosing.

MAT611 - Instructional Design

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Winter
  • This is a required course
  • Prerequisites: MAT603 Web Design and Media Production; MAT610 Educational Technology

This course puts into practice the theories learned in Educational Technology. Students will continue to study the different approaches of established instructional systems design models, and the integration of technology into teaching. They will apply one of those models to create a fully functioning instructional unit that successfully resolves a real-world instructional problem. The unit will be usability tested and evaluated to see if learning outcomes were met. Students will then learn how to integrate the unit into an instructional setting, addressing issues such as accessibility, change management and training. This prepares students, both professionally and for their eventual Capstone Project, to implement the analysis, creation and evaluation of a given learning solution that appropriately and effectively integrates technology with teaching. Students will write a final report and present their project and findings.
Prereqs: Educational Technology and Web Design I
or permission of the instructor

MAT614 - Facilitating Online Learning

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring
  • This is a required course

How do we facilitate online learning so that students are optimally engaged and learning objectives are being met? Participants will integrate their knowledge of learning theory and instructional design to explore best practices for providing content to students online, engaging them in a vibrant learner-centered community and effectively evaluating their learning. Participants will discuss issues specific to courses that are online-enhanced, blended and fully online. Accessibility and learner support will be emphasized. Participants will utilize Moodle to create a learning module that integrates pedagogy with appropriate technologies to engage students in meeting learning objectives. Facilitating Online Learning (FOL) will itself be facilitated as a workshop where participants will take an active role in teaching each other and introducing topics of interest to the class.

MAT616 - Games and Simulations

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Spring
  • This is a required course

This fully online course will teach students how to begin to effectively use online games and simulations for teaching. Students will explore 3D worlds and become comfortable with their usage as educational tools. Using a learning management tool (Moodle) as our base for this course, students will explore Second Life and Jokaydia, but will also delve into game simulations like World of Warcraft and MinecraftEdu (a problem-solving creative sandbox world) for their educational values. Participants will create avatars, connect with online educational communities, and develop strategies for using 3D worlds in their teaching.

MAT699 - Capstone II: Implementing

  • 4 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Winter, Spring
  • This is a required course
  • Prerequisites: MAT609 Capstone I: Planning

Students enroll in Capstone II: Implementing in their final trimester and complete their Capstone project thereby completing a key degree requirement. Supported by an Advisor, students: create the deliverable planned in Capstone I; deliver a formal presentation of his/her project; participate in a conversation about what they have learned doing the Capstone and their course of study; and submit their completed Capstone website, which includes a written Project Summary and Retrospective on Learning. Students Capstones are assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Capstone involves both process and product. Students engage in the process of identifying a problem or opportunity, planning and carrying out a project, and reflecting on their learning. During the two-trimester process, students create products including a completed website, a project deliverable designed to solve the problem or address the opportunity, and an elevator pitch. There is a strong focus on ensuring an agile approach to planning and implementation and on clear, professional communication. Together process and product provide students with a deep learning experience during their last two trimesters at the Graduate School.

Elective Courses

EDU615 - Technology and the Common Core

  • 3 credits

The Common Core State Standards present an opportunity for greater technology integration in our schools. Participants in this course will collaborate to find pathways to digital age teaching and learning as they unpack the Common Core to discover the connections between these new standards and opportunities to redefine instruction. Using curricular models such as Understanding by Design and transformation models such as SAMR, participants will use digital tools and strategies to produce materials that integrate the Common Core standards into their teaching. This online course will provide a rich and engaging professional learning environment online combined with three synchronous video conferencing sessions to share ideas and develop a class rapport.

EDU617 - Introduction to Physical Computing (Makerspaces/fab labs) in Education

  • 3 credits

This is an online, hands on, experiential workshop that will cover the foundation skills, equipment and resources used in Makerspaces and fabrication labs in education. Students will complete the same a set of tutorials at home while supporting each other online via discussion, documentation (photo/video) and reflection. In addition, students will build a personal learning network of Makers and visit at least one maker lab in their region. Tutorials will include micro-controllers (Arduino), rapid prototyping (3d printers laser cutters), and basic programming. Readings and course materials will focus on using physical computing in K-12 environments to support Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math (STEAM) education. Students will leave the course ready to teach the tutorials they've completed in a standard classroom, accompanied by field trips to a fab lab.
Course materials are approximately $175 for supplies and tools.

EDU619 - Assistive Technology and Universal Design

  • 3 credits

The course will provide an overview of Assistive Technologies (AT) and innovative practices as guided by Universal Design (UD). Students will gain an understanding of the ways AT and the UD principles are shaping our understanding of traditional classroom instruction, assessment, accommodations and student support, both at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Course discussions will focus on the applications of universal design and traditional assistive technology software (e.g.; Kurzweil, Inspiration, and Dragon-Naturally Speaking). Students will design and develop a UD instructional project (lesson plan, technology implementation plan, or instructional unit) of their choosing. Online instruction will be supplemented by on site observations at Landmark College. Observations will be scheduled with the instructor and student based on student interest and availability and opportunities at Landmark. Minimum expectations are one ½ day campus visit, that includes a tour, lunch and a class or lab observation.

EDU625 - Making Mobile Media for Educators

  • 3 credits

An introductory course targeted at educators who to make mobile media (games, simulation, interactive ebooks, apps, online learning modules, iTunes U courses) to support teaching and learning. Relevant readings on the current state of mobile learning in education will be assigned and discussed as students create their own mobile media. You We will explore development options that use combination of both computers and mobile devices (tablets, phones, etc). You will need a computer for this course (Mac or Windows) and access to a mobile device to share and test the mobile media you create. Participants will choose one app development platform for Android or Apple devices and become familiar with that platforms development cycle (from conception to publishing). Examples of a final project are: An iTunes U course, a working app prototype, an interactive multimedia ebook, a STEM (Science Technology Engineering, Mathematics) unit, or an online course. A basic ability to use mobile devices, computers and the Net is the only prerequisite. No experience in app development or computer science needed.

MAT613 - Leading Change

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Spring

After an instructional unit is created, it needs to be integrated into the organization for which it was made. This is a complex process, involving many layers of cultural change within an individual classroom, school district, campus or business. This course provides planning strategies for leaders of change. Topics of study include the political and economic ramifications of introducing new technology, strategies for change management, various organizational models, and the need for professional development.

MAT618 - Online Collaborative Tools

  • 3 credits

Web-based Cloud collaboration has changed the way we work and learn. This fully online class will prepare you to successfully use online collaboration in the classroom/workplace using Google Apps for Education as a platform.

Students will experience collaborative reading, collaborative notetaking, collaborative assignments designed to leverage the collaborative power of Google Apps for Education and other Google tools.

Students will use online collaborative tools (such as Diigo) that support collaborative curation of resources and knowledge creation. Students will design a final project that demonstrates using Google Apps for Education at an expert level. The project will focus on changing the culture of teaching and learning in an organization. Projects may range from become a Google Certified Educator, a Google Certified Administrator, setting up your own Google domain for a school, non-profit, or a business. Some project ideas may require extra fees such as testing fees or domain registration fees) Access to a well functioning laptop and DSL/Cable speed Internet connection are required.

MAT622 - Transforming Learning with Mobile Devices

  • 3 credits

Tablets, smartphones, readers and other mobile devices are rapidly becoming part of the learning landscape. This course will explore and evaluate features and resources to leverage when integrating mobile devices in instructional design and curriculum. Course topics will include apps, multimedia, and multimodal resources such as ibooks, ebooks, iTunes U and Open University. There will be a heavy focus on moving beyond consumption into creation and collaboration with mobile devices, using text, audio, images, and video. Personalized learning, accessibility, and other pedagogical considerations will be explored as we pursue a creative inquiry into what type of transformation is possible with mobile devices. This course is fully online and asynchronous; two synchronous online meetings will be arranged once the course starts.

A tablet or mobile device with the ability to capture and edit images, videos, and audio, and up to a $50 budget for purchasing apps will be required. This course will focus on iPads/ipod touch/iphone. Other mobile devices may be used instead of Apple devices with permission of the instructor. Please confer with the instructor about using non-Apple devices prior to enrollment.

MAT670 - Capstone Extension

  • Variable credits
  • Taught in Winter

Register for this zero credit class to complete Capstone work.

MAT999 - General MAT Elective

  • 3 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Winter, Spring

This is a 3 credit elective class on pertinent topics for the Master of Arts in Teaching with Technology program.

MBAS600 - Foundations of Sustainability in Business

  • 3 credits

This course provides an overview of key concepts, historical perspectives, and state-of-the-art concepts, tools, methods and metrics within Corporate Sustainability Management (CSM), Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), and environmental management. This introductory business management course is predicated on the assumption that the performance of all organizations must be judged, not only in terms of their financial performance, but also by their non-financial social and environmental performance.

MBAS601 - Thriving in Teams and Organizations

  • 3 credits

Thriving in Teams and Organizations addresses theory and practice of how individuals and groups act and interact in an organizational context with a focus on distributed and virtual teams. The course draws from research and theories in Organizational Behavior and Positive Psychology to shed light on such human dynamics as motivation, perception, decision-making, and conflict management. It addresses questions such as the following: What makes teams and organizations effective and sustainable? What are the challenges to effective teams and organizations? How can you understand your personal predilections as a team member and organizational player?

MBAS602 - Stakeholder-Based Communication, Persuasion and Negotiation

  • 3 credits

The integration of sustainability into business expands the scope of communications beyond the traditional focus of shareholder primacy to encompass all relevant stakeholders. This course teaches students to communicate clearly, receive information discerningly, persuade convincingly, negotiate diplomatically, and report on sustainability in the context of ecological, social, and economic limits and thresholds. Foundational concepts and toolsets include: Stakeholder Theory as articulated by Freeman; Stakeholder Engagement based on AccountAbility 1000 Stakeholder Engagement Standard; Ury & Fishers notion of Principled Negotiation; Lakoffs concept of Cognitive Framing; and Sustainability Reporting guided by the Global Reporting Initiative Sustainability Reporting Framework.

MBAS621 - Introduction to Systems Thinking

  • 1 credit

This course introduces the concepts and tools of systems thinking. Creating sustainability within organizations, businesses and the world requires paradigmatic shifts, and insights into how to effectively create change. Systems thinkers have shown that the effective levers of change are often counter-intuitive, or only become obvious when the mental model which structures them is revealed. This course uses diverse readings and models to develop competence and comfort with systems thinking analysis and prepare students for Applied Systems Thinking.

MDO602 - Fundraising and Philanthropy

  • 2 credits
  • Taught in Fall, Winter

This course assumes a basic level of understanding of fundraising methods and history, and covers the mechanics of various fundraising sources and techniques as well as the psychological and philosophical underpinnings of both fundraising and philanthropy. It assumes that giving, as well as encouraging others to give, will be an ongoing basis for sustaining the nonprofit sector, but will explore the implications of impending political, technological, generational and taxation changes. There will be practical instruction and discussion on foundation, corporate, major donor, direct mail, grassroots, social media, event, and planned gift fundraising, with serious investigation of the human factors that make these successful.

MDO604 - Outcomes and Evaluations

  • 2 credits
  • Taught in Winter

This course explores the rationale and methods for setting and assessing measurable outcomes in mission-driven environments. Students will examine the benefits and challenges of establishing program, organizational, and community level outcomes and using metrics to determine "what is better as a result of our efforts?" They will come away with the tools and strategies to set, assess, and use the results of measurable outcomes. The course will use a three-pronged approach: didactic learning about the purpose and techniques of outcome measurement; applied learning, with student teams each working with an organization to develop outcomes and assessment strategies; and sharing and analyzing the experience, deepening students' ability to translate learning to practice.

MDO605 - Project Management

  • 3 credits

Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), this course guides executive directors, event planners and others responsible for the delivery of projects through the agile application of the project management processes. Key topics include project selection and scoping, risk analysis, schedule and budget management, quality planning, team building, and project communication. We will explore methods to adapt standard practices to fit the unique requirements of delivering volunteer-based projects.

MDO616 - Nonprofit Seminar

  • 1 credit
  • Taught in Fall, Winter, Spring

Short topic courses covering various aspects of nonprofit management and mission driven organizations.