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Academic Information

Academic Year

Marlboro College follows a calendar of two semesters each year.

Bachelor’s Degree

Marlboro College offers Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in International Studies degrees.

Graduation Requirements:

  • Meet the Clear Writing Requirement,
  • Complete a 45-60 credit Plan of Concentration,
  • Earn 120 credits with a minimum of C- on Plan of Concentration,
  • Submit a final copy of the Work in appropriate form to the Registrar,
  • Pay all College bills.

Bachelor of Science Degree: A Bachelor of Science (BS) degree may be selected by a student with a broad grounding in the Natural Sciences. To be eligible for a BS degree a student must complete at least two foundational Mathematics courses (usually either two semesters of Calculus or one semester each of Calculus and Statistics), at least one foundational course in four of the five Natural Science fields (Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Physics/Astronomy) and at least two advanced courses in one area of the Natural Sciences or Mathematics.

International Studies: World Studies Program students earn a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in International Studies, awarded by Marlboro College in association with the School for International Training.

Academic Fees and Billing

See the Marlboro College website for current year Academics Fees and Student Accounts.

Enrollment/Registration

College registration or enrollment and final course selection are essential processes for establishing status as a student at Marlboro College.

All new and returning students are expected to register at the College on the date and time specified in the academic calendar. The Director of Housing and Residential Life Office issues photo IDs, and the Plant and Operations Office issues automobile registration and room keys. The Total Health Center will copy the student primary insurance information and issue a secondary insurance identification card.

On Registration/Enrollment Day or within 48 hours of arrival on campus, every student who brings a motor-propelled vehicle to College must register this vehicle with the Plant and Operations Office on the form provided at enrollment.

Denial of Enrollment: The College reserves the right to deny enrollment to students who have not fulfilled their financial or other obligations to the College. Enrollment will also be denied to any international student without an appropriate student visa.

Students who have not satisfactorily enrolled by the final course registration date will not be allowed to attend courses, tutorials or other academic college related activities for the semester, or to earn credit for the semester.

Students are expected to consult with their academic advisors and formulate a plan of study within the first few days of the term. Complete course information must be submitted online as part of the course registration system, and must also be approved by the academic advisor. The submission must occur no later than the published date for final course registration at the beginning of each semester. Failure to submit the form to the Registrar may result in a student being withdrawn from the College. Certification as a student at Marlboro College occurs only after course registration has been approved by the Registrar’s Office.

Transfer Credit

General Statement

The Policy

Credit for Examinations

Foreign Institutions

  General Statement

Marlboro College considers transferring credits for academic liberal arts courses taken at a college or university accredited by an organization that is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) or the U.S. Department of Education. In order for courses to transfer, the grade must be a C- or better, and the course(s) must be comparable in content, nature and intensity to course(s) offered at Marlboro College. Grades are not transferable.

We also consider transfer credit for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations (see below for a list). Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration.

All transfer credit is provisional. The provisional credits are fully granted once the student completes one semester of coursework as a degree student at Marlboro College. Students should consult with the Registrar for more information on the logistics of processing transfer credits.

  The Policy

Only courses in which a student has earned a grade of C- or better may be considered for transfer. Courses graded P (Pass) will not be considered unless the student can provide certification from the institution issuing the record that a grade of P is equivalent to a letter grade of C- or better.

Students submit official transcripts of coursework completed at regionally-accredited degree-granting institutions to the Registrar’s office or in some cases the Admissions Office (only if new applicants or newly admitted, not yet enrolled). For incoming students, transcripts must be received by the Registrar’s office by the first day of classes of the term in which they enroll. Current Marlboro students who wish to transfer in credits from absentia or leave from Marlboro College must request an official transcript be sent to Marlboro College’s Registrar’s office. The Registrar’s office must receive the transcript prior to the end of final exam period of the term in which the student has returned to Marlboro. Credits are not removed once they are added to an academic record. Students may request, in writing to the Registrar’s office, that a course not be transferred to Marlboro; however, the Registrar’s office must receive such a request before receiving the official transcript.

Marlboro College does not award credit for nonacademic experiential learning prior to coming to Marlboro. Consequently, such credit awarded by other institutions will not be considered for transfer if it is based on experiential learning. Students on Plan, however, may arrange for experiential credit to be applied to their Plan of Concentration.

Courses usually not recognized include physical education, education courses for teacher certification, and other technical or vocational courses, such as engineering, business, computer applications, management, and marketing. Many communications courses will not transfer, including journalism and effective speaking courses. Remedial-level courses, such as writing tutorial, math skills, reading improvement or study skills courses are not accepted for transfer credit. Marlboro College generally does not award transfer credit for First-Year Seminars unless the course description/syllabus demonstrates rigorous academic work comparable to work offered at Marlboro College; in cases where these credits are accepted, a maximum of two credits are allowed to transfer. Transfer students who have earned an R.N. from an accredited nursing school with a three-year program will be granted 30 credits, or one year’s work, toward the Marlboro College degree.

Students who have taken college-level courses through an accredited degree-granting college or university while in high school may submit an official college transcript of that course work to the Admissions Office or the Registrar for evaluation. Provided the student received a grade of C- or better, the credits may be applied to the degree at Marlboro even if they also apply towards the high school diploma. Official transcripts must be received by the Registrar’s office by the first day of classes of the term in which the student enrolls.

Credit for courses that were taken 10 or more years ago is generally not granted in transfer if it is required for a student’s Plan of Concentration. Exceptions may be granted at the discretion of the Plan Sponsor and the Dean of Faculty, when the student can demonstrate current knowledge in the subject area. Credit for courses applied as general credit may be accepted regardless of the age of the credit.

Once students have enrolled in a degree program at Marlboro, they may take coursework at other institutions while they are degree-seeking or on leave of absence or in absentia. Students should check with the Registrar about which classes they take elsewhere are likely to transfer credits back to Marlboro.

  Credit for Examinations

Marlboro College may grant up to 24 credits in total for acceptable performance on the following standardized exams. It is the student’s responsibility to have official transcripts of test scores sent to the Registrar’s Office. Such credit will not be awarded on the basis of another institution’s acceptance.

Advanced Placement (AP): Marlboro College grants up to 4 credits per exam for Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) with a score of 4 or 5. No more than 16 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved AP exams. AP credits are generally awarded during the Sophomore 2 semester.

International Baccalaureate (IB): Marlboro College grants up to eight credits for higher level (HL) examinations passed with scores of 5, 6, or 7 from the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program.

Foreign maturity certificate examinations: Marlboro College considers the results of certain international diploma or certificate examinations and grants up to eight credits for United Kingdom “A” Level General Certificate Examinations grades of A or B. Certain other examinations, such as the French Baccalaureat, German Arbitur, and the Federal Swiss Maturity Certificate may also be recognized. To be considered, students must send their official transcripts to the Registrar’s Office.

Students may appeal the decision of which credits will transfer. To do so, they must state their case in writing, to the Registrar’s office, within one month of the Registrar’s notice that the credits have transferred. The Registrar may request additional information from the student, such as copies of the course descriptions or syllabi. The Registrar may consult with Marlboro College faculty and the Dean of Faculty to review appeals. The Registrar shall notify the student of the result of the appeal.

  Foreign Institutions

If the courses/programs were taken at foreign (non-U.S.) institutions the college or university must be approved by the ministry of education in that country. Since foreign institutions have different systems for measuring coursework, students who study abroad must present official documentation to the Registrar’s Office in order for credits to transfer to Marlboro.

All credentials must be evaluated by an official evaluation organization. The student is responsible to assuring that the organization submits its report to Marlboro College. The costs of the evaluation and postage are borne by the student. Exceptions to this policy include official transcripts in English bearing American grading and credit standards (e.g., American colleges and study abroad programs through American colleges) and official transcripts in English using ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) standards. See the Marlboro website for a listing of evaluation agencies. A minimum grade of C- or the equivalent is required in order for a credit equivalency to transfer. Credential evaluations must be received by the end of the next academic term.

Cross-Registration With Marlboro College Graduate School And Continuing Education

A Marlboro student may take up to two Graduate School courses per trimester with the agreement of the student’s Plan sponsor/advisor, Dean of Faculty and the relevant Program Director.

A student wishing to take a Graduate School course for credit should first discuss this option with his/her sponsor or advisor. The advisor and student may consult with the appropriate Program Director as to the level and content of the classes. Students should be aware that space restrictions may apply. The pre-registration form is then signed by the student’s Plan sponsor/advisor and filed in the Registrar’s office before the registration deadline.

While Graduate School course credits may be used as Plan credits, they will not be evaluated in the oral examination and grades received from graduate school faculty will appear on the transcript, that is, progress grades will not be used for any Graduate School courses.

All academic undergraduate policies and deadlines apply to students taking courses at the Graduate School. Marlboro seniors graduating in May are not permitted to take a spring trimester course at the Graduate School. Other students wishing to take a spring course (approximately May – August) must abide by the Marlboro guidelines governing summer academic work.

Transfer Students

Because all students need to complete at least 45 credits on Plan in order to graduate, and that generally takes three or four semesters, the highest class standing that is awarded, no matter how many transfer credits are accepted, is First-Semester Junior (JR1). Also, all transfer students must earn at Marlboro at least one-quarter of the credits counted toward their graduation.

Junior transfer students, if their previous records permit, normally are encouraged to start a Plan of Concentration as soon as possible after enrollment at the College. However, a junior transfer whose record does not meet the standard Marlboro prerequisites for Plan would normally be expected to spend an extra semester or more at the College.

Musical Instrument Instruction

Individual instruction in musical instruments (including voice) is provided by the Brattleboro Music Center (BMC) and the Vermont Jazz Center (VJC). Fees are paid directly to the Centers.

Full-time students may receive credit for music lessons taken at the Brattleboro Music Center and/or Vermont Jazz Center as long as they include the lessons as a Marlboro College Tutorial on the Course Registration Form. Exceptions for part-time students may be made by the Dean of Faculty.

If students wish to include BMC or VJC music study as part of the Plan of Concentration, they must secure approval in advance from College music faculty.

All academic regulations listed on the official Marlboro College web site, including those for Incompletes, apply to courses taken for credit at the BMC/VJC. If students wish to drop BMC lessons, they must submit drop slips to the Registrar by the posted deadline in effect for all courses. If lessons are dropped but no slip is submitted, the instructor will assign a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing). Students must attend a minimum of nine (9) half-hour lessons, or the equivalent, to receive a passing grade.

The BMC/VJC will not submit grades to the College unless a student has paid for lessons. If no grade is submitted for this reason, the course will be entered on the permanent record with no credit (“NC”) given.

A Plan student in music may be reimbursed for one credit per semester (typically one-half hour lesson per week) of private instrumental instruction by Marlboro if the following conditions are met:

  1. A major component of the student’s Plan is in performance on that instrument with at least two recitals in the senior year;
  2. The instrumental instructor has been approved by the music department;
  3. The student has demonstrated a desire and ability to perform in previous years (through performances, concerts, etc.);
  4. Reimbursement is given retroactively. Reimbursement shall be given only after the student has successfully completed work each semester (C- or better).

Fines

Late Payment Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if payment is not received by the due date.

Late/Provisional Enrollment Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if a student fails to register on enrollment day.

Late Registration Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if a student fails to file their course registration with the Registrar’s office by the deadline.

Late Motor Vehicle or Firearm Registration Fee: $25 plus $10 for each successive day, or portion thereof, after the appropriate deadline.

Return Check Charge: There is a $30.00 charge for each check returned by your bank.

Special Fees

All charges are subject to change and payable in advance.

Matriculated Students

  • Part-time students: per credit: $1,329
  • Each credit, including tutorials, over the maximum of 18 credits: per credit: $1,329
  • Each audit over the maximum of 18 credits: $500
  • Materials fees for Visual Arts courses: $20-100
  • In absentia 1 & 5, per semester: $19,935
  • In absentia 2,3 & 4*: per semester at another institution, continuing student $500
  • *In absentia 4: fee for credit by examination, per credit: $665
  • Fee for Reinstatement on Plan: $300
  • Summer work with Marlboro faculty for credit: rate per credit (8 credit maximum) $1,329

Non-Matriculated Students

  • Graduates of Marlboro, per credit: $665
    Note: Application is made to the Admissions Office. Tutorials are not offered at this rate.
  • Materials fees for Visual Arts courses: $20-100
  • Part-time students per semester per credit (maximum of 8 credits per semester) or per credit over the maximum 18: $1,329
  • Auditors: Fee per course (maximum of two courses per semester): $500

Note: Senior Citizens, 65 years of age or older, may audit one course per semester without charge by arrangement with the Dean of Faculty and the instructor. Graduates of Marlboro College may audit up to two courses per semester without charge by arrangement with the Dean of Faculty, the instructor and the Director of Alumni Affairs. Emeritus faculty may take classes at the college free of charge.

Refund Policy

Withdrawals and Leaves of Absences Policy

Financial Obligations

Return of Title IV Funds Policy

  Withdrawals and Leaves of Absences Policy

No adjustment of tuition, fees, institutional or non-federal aid will be made in the event that a student withdraws or separates from the College at any time after enrollment except as herein specified. No adjustment is made in cases of suspension or expulsion or dismissal from campus housing as a result of disciplinary action. Students who are granted a leave of absence after the start of classes will be treated in the same manner as students who withdraw from the College for calculation purposes. The same policy applies to a student on a one-semester or full-year of absentia status. Exceptions are made if a policy for aid other than institutional aid requires the college to return funds in full or in part.

The Federal Start of Term is the first day of classes which includes Intro Classes.

If the withdrawal occurs before the first day of classes an adjustment of tuition, student activities fees, health services fees, student health insurance, board and non-federal aid will be made. There will be no refund of the enrollment deposit. The enrollment deposit may be carried forward in the event a student postpones enrollment for up to one academic year. Students remain liable for the full housing charge.

If a withdrawal occurs on or after the first day of classes an adjustment to the student account for tuition, board (meal plan), health services fee and non-federal aid will be made according to the schedule below. Students remain liable for student activities fees, lab fees, student health insurance and the full housing charge.

If the official withdrawal occurs on or after the first day of classes (Federal Start of Term), the schedule of tuition, board, health service fees and non-federal aid is calculated as follows, based on calendar days:

  1. If the withdrawal occurs within the first 7 days, an adjustment of 80 percent is applied to the account.
  2. If the withdrawal occurs within day 8 through day 14, an adjustment of 60 percent is applied to the account.
  3. If the withdrawal occurs within day 15 through day 21, an adjustment of 40 percent is applied to the account.
  4. If the withdrawal occurs within day 22 through day 28, an adjustment of 20 percent is applied to the account.
  5. No tuition, fees and non-federal aid is returned or refunded after 28 days.

A student’s withdrawal date is:

  1. the date the student officially notifies the Registrar’s Office of intent to withdraw; or
  2. the date the student begins the College’s withdrawal process; or
  3. the midpoint of the semester for a student who leaves without notifying the College; or
  4. at the College’s discretion, the student’s last date of attendance at a documented academically-related activity (which includes but is not limited to an exam, a tutorial, computer-assisted instruction, academic counseling, academic advising, turning in a class assignment or attending a study group that is assigned by the institution).

Withdrawing students who live in campus housing are expected to vacate the campus within 24 hours of notifying the Registrar of their intent to withdraw unless an extension has been granted by the Director of Housing and Residential Life.

If the College’s refund calculation policy conflicts with the Veterans Administration regulations concerning enrolled veterans receiving VA benefits, the VA policy on refunds will prevail.

  Financial Obligations

Enrolled Students who accept a housing assignment but subsequently do not live in campus housing for any reason will be charged a room contract fee in the amount of $400. In addition, students with approved housing assignments who fail to notify the College that they will not live in campus housing at least two weeks prior to the date the dorms open are responsible for the full room charge.

Students who move off campus during the term for personal reasons (or who live in campus housing not requiring them to be on meal plan) who opt to discontinue participation in the meal plan qualify for a reduction of board fees according to the schedule above.

  Return Of Title IV Funds Policy

Adjustments in financial aid awards for students who withdraw on or after the first day of classes are determined according to a formula prescribed by federal regulations. Marlboro College and the student will be required to return to the federal aid programs the amount of aid received that was in excess of the aid “earned” for the time period the student was enrolled.

The percentage of the semester completed is the percentage of aid earned: This is calculated by the number of days the student attended divided by the number of days in the payment period (i.e. semester). For example, if a student withdrew on the 20th day of a semester 114 days in length, the student would have earned only 17.5% of the aid he or she received (20/114=0.175). Students who remain enrolled through at least 60% of the semester are considered to have earned 100% of the aid received and will not be subject to a return of Federal Title IV funds. Students receiving financial aid who leave before the 60% point of the semester may not have enough “earned” aid to cover charges owed but are still responsible for satisfying their financial obligations to the College. Students considering withdrawal are strongly encouraged to confer with the Financial Aid Office and the Student Accounts Office concerning any anticipated refund of charges and adjustments in financial aid. Students may also be required to return funds released to them for personal expenses. Details of the federal regulations can be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

Academic Advising

Dedicated Hour

Responsibilities of the Student

Responsibilities of the Advisor

Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

Advising at Marlboro is central to the mission of the College: to “teach students to think clearly and to learn independently within a structured program of liberal studies.” Its success depends on three important components: the student, the faculty advisor, and, in support of both, the Director of Academic Advising.

  Dedicated Hour

The Dedicated Hour is one of the advising mechanisms by which students and advisors meet on a regular basis on Wednesdays. Advising groups may discuss academic matters and issues of community import and/or engage in context-related activities. Advising groups contain students from each year, and coalesce around a general academic interest.

  Responsibilities of the Student

The student’s active participation in the advising relationship is crucial to the development and achievement of his or her educational goals. The responsibilities of the student are outlined below.

  • To attend, participate, and engage fully in the Dedicated Hour.
  • To develop academic goals by taking advantage of appropriate college resources such as consultation with the advisor, Plan workshops, the Course Book & Plan Guide, and the Handbook.
  • To become familiar with graduation requirements and all other academic policies as well as to meet all registration and Plan application deadlines.
  • To take responsibility for academic choices.
  • To consult with the advisor concerning changes (adds and drops) to an already approved registration.
  • To consult with the advisor when in academic difficulty and especially after receiving a letter of academic warning at mid-term or being placed on academic probation at the end of the semester.
  • To keep appointments.
  • To change advisors if there is not a good fit or if the advisor is going on sabbatical.
  • To seek additional help from other College resources when necessary.

  Responsibilities of the Advisor

The faculty advisor plays a vital role in the intellectual growth of the Marlboro student. The advisor is not only an experienced guide to the curriculum and the institution but is active in helping the student to set educational goals and to work toward meeting them. The advisor’s help occurs in different ways at two distinct times during the student’s undergraduate years: (1) in the first two years when the student is discovering new avenues of learning, sharpening skills, and building a foundation for advanced work; and (2) in the final two years when the student is on Plan, committed to a narrower and more focused study.

While the advisor is expected to introduce, inform, and offer advice, the most critical part of the advisor’s role is to listen, discuss, challenge, assist, collaborate, and model activities that are a natural extension of teaching. The responsibilities of the advisor are listed below.

  • To facilitate the collaborative functioning of the Dedicated Hour.
  • To introduce the student to the academic program by explaining the principles informing the organization and the aims of the curriculum.
  • To work with the student in planning his or her academic program, paying particular attention to Marlboro’s goals that each student:
    • study broadly each semester of the first two years, including courses in several different disciplines;
    • become acquainted with the interests, methods and teaching styles of as many faculty members as possible; and
    • develop and improve fundamental skills including clear writing, careful reading, critical analysis, and numeracy.
  • To approve the student’s course registration for the semester, including any “drops” or “adds.”
  • To encourage the student to follow the recommendations of the English Committee after the Writing Placement Exam and to help the student understand and prepare for meeting the Clear Writing Requirement.
  • To provide preliminary information about the nature of the Plan and the role of the first two years in preparation for going on Plan.
  • To be available for consultation during posted office hours or by appointment.
  • To encourage advisees to meet with the advisor regularly and to notify the Director of Academic Advising when difficulties arise.
  • To refer the student to other College resources to meet individual needs. Advisors are not expected to be counselors.
  • To assist the student in changing advisors when appropriate.

  Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

The Director of Academic Advising coordinates all aspects of academic advising, including:

  • Assigning incoming students to academic advisors,
  • Working with faculty on agendas for Dedicated Hours,
  • Assisting faculty and students with academic issues,
  • Following up academic concerns raised by faculty,
  • Providing information sessions on the Plan,
  • Overseeing the Peer Advising Program.

Academic Credit

General Information

Credit Load

Class Standing

Dropping a Course

Withdrawing From a Course

Adding a Course

Changing Credits for a Course

Course Repeats

Incompletes

  General Information

One academic credit corresponds to approximately 45 hours of work, inside and outside of class, over the appropriate time period.

  Credit Load

The normal full-time course load is 15 credits. In order to meet the graduation requirement of 120 credits, a student must average 15 credits per semester over 4 years. The minimum allowable load for a full-time student is 12 credits per semester. Entering freshmen and students on academic probation may find a load of fewer than 15 credits advantageous, though signing up for just 12 credits has its own risks.

The maximum allowable load (without additional charge) is 18 credits of active work per semester. Students may register for more than 18 credits only by vote of the faculty. There is a fee for each credit in excess of 18, payable in advance (see Special Fees).

  Class Standing

The following are the number of earned credits generally corresponding to a student’s class standing:

  • 0 credits = Freshman 1
  • 12 credits = Freshman 2
  • 25 credits = Sophomore 1
  • 42 credits = Sophomore 2
  • 55 credits = Junior 1
  • 72 credits = Junior 2
  • 84 credits = Senior 1
  • 102 credits = Senior 2

Please note that class standing is also dependent upon Plan progress and credit distribution, as outlined elsewhere in the academic regulations (e.g., a student may have enough earned credits to qualify as a Senior 1 according to the above chart but not enough credits on Plan, so his/her status may actually be Junior 2). In addition, restrictions apply to credits transferred from other colleges, credits by examination, or credits earned through Advanced Placement. (See also Credit Placement.)

Students receiving VA benefits must consult the Registrar to make sure they are in compliance with VA rules.

International students must consult with the Office for International Services to be sure they are in compliance with their visa status.

  Dropping a Course

Students wishing to drop a course must submit to the Registrar the appropriate form (available outside the Registrar’s Office or on the web; see Forms) signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. Students may drop a course up to 2 weeks (or posted date) after final course selection without the course appearing on the permanent record. Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

  Withdrawing From a Course

If a student withdraws from a course after the deadline for dropping a course, a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) must be assigned by the instructor. Students must withdraw from a course by submitting completed paperwork to the Registrar, at least one week prior to the last day of classes to avoid receiving a letter grade (A-F). Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

Credits assigned to the course will still be counted in the total for the semester but will be considered inactive. Students are permitted a maximum of 18 credits of active course work. An extra charge will be assessed whenever a student is enrolled for more than 18 credits of active course work in a semester. (See special fees.)

  Adding a Course

Students wishing to add a course after final registration must submit to the Registrar, at least one week prior to the last day of classes, the appropriate form signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. (See special fees.)

  Changing Credits for a Course

Students may, with the consent of the instructor, increase or decrease the credits of a course, up to one week prior to the last day of classes, by submitting to the Registrar the appropriate form signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. Faculty reserve the right to change credits through the end of the semester. Other policies may apply for incompletes and in absentia work. Students are expected to maintain accurate registration schedules during the semester. Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

  Course Repeats

Some courses build skills or change in ways that make them repeatable regardless of grades given. Official descriptions for such courses include the statement “May be repeated for additional credit.”

For other courses, the following rules apply: 1) A student may repeat a course for credit, once only, if he/she has earned a grade of D or F. Both courses and their grades remain permanently on the transcript; however, the credits will be earned only in the course with the higher grade. 2) A course with a final grade of Permanent Incomplete (PI), WP or WF will count as one attempt and may be repeated only once for credit. 3) A student receiving an Unsatisfactory Plan grade may not enroll subsequently for the same or similar course if the initial U will convert to degree credits upon completion of the Plan.

  Incompletes

The Dean of Faculty may grant an Incomplete if extraordinary circumstances make it impossible for a student to complete work on time. A family emergency, medical crisis, or outside catastrophe beyond the control of the student may warrant an Incomplete. Incompletes are not granted in cases of time mismanagement or to relieve end-of-term pressures.

(1) A student requesting an incomplete must fill out an Incomplete Request Form (from the Registrar), which lists the work to be completed.

(2) The student must then meet with the Director of Academic Advising to discuss the request and options.

(3) The student must then speak with the Dean of Faculty, who may ask for corroborating evidence of the circumstances that warrant the Incomplete.

(4) Once the Dean has authorized the Incomplete, the Director of Advising will secure the signature of the faculty member in whose course or tutorial the Incomplete is sought.

(5) The faculty member certifies that it is possible for the student to complete the work given additional time and assigns a default grade, should the work not be completed.

(6) Finally, the Director of Advising will submit the form to the Registrar.

Requests for incompletes are accepted only during the week before the deadline for withdrawing from classes/adding credits. All requests must be submitted by the deadline for withdrawing from classes/ adding credits.

Work is to be completed and received by the faculty member within one month from the last day of classes. If work is not completed, the default grade will be entered on the transcript. Faculty members are asked to submit a revised grade to the Registrar as soon as work is completed, but no later than the second faculty meeting of the year. In rare cases, such as when coursework cannot be completed outside of the course or when the original justification for the incomplete persists beyond the deadline, it is possible for the student to receive a Permanent Incomplete.

Academic Standing

In order to be in good academic standing, a full-time student must earn at least 12 credits with grades of C- or better. (See Credit Load.) A full-time student who earns 9-11 credits will be liable for probation. A full-time student earning fewer than 9 credits is liable for dismissal. (See Academic Probation and Disciplinary Action.) A full-time student who has not submitted a Preliminary Plan Application by the end of the first semester of his/her junior year is liable for discontinuance. Transfer students who arrive in their junior or senior year must submit a Preliminary Plan Application by the end of their first semester at Marlboro or they will be eligible for discontinuance. (See Discontinuance and Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance.)

Academic Probation

A full-time student who earns fewer than 12 credits of C- or better is liable for academic probation. Academic probation is automatic at 9, 10, or 11 credits and must be voted by the faculty at 8 credits or fewer (see Guided Probation, below). Students who show a flagrant disregard for their academic responsibilities (for instance, by failing to attend classes regularly or by failing to submit required work) may be placed on academic probation by vote of the faculty prior to the end of the semester.

When a student on Plan receives a report of unsatisfactory (U) from his or her sponsor at the end of a semester, he or she will be liable for academic probation even if he or she earns 12 or more credits at C- or better.

To get off Academic Probation or Guided Probation, a student must meet the minimum requirement for good standing (12 credits of C- or better) by the end of the semester immediately following that which led to probation.

Academic Dismissal

Academic Dismissal

Guided Probation

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan

Appeal

Discontinuance

  Academic Dismissal

A full-time student who earns fewer than 9 credits at C- or better is liable for dismissal. A full-time student on academic probation who earns fewer than 12 credits at C- or better during the subsequent semester is liable for dismissal and is likely to be dismissed. Dismissal requires a vote by a majority of the faculty present at a faculty meeting. Faculty members are asked to inform the Director of Academic Advising of likely failures at least one week before the end of term. Any student liable for dismissal will be notified before the final faculty meeting whenever possible. The student may submit a statement to be read at the meeting by the Dean of Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, or by the student’s advisor.

Full-time students liable for dismissal but not previously on probation who have made serious efforts to meet their academic responsibilities (e.g., by attending classes regularly, participating constructively, and submitting work as required) are often placed on Guided Probation by faculty vote, rather than dismissed, especially during their first two or three semesters of college work.

Students liable for dismissal who have shown a flagrant disregard for their academic responsibilities are generally dismissed.

  Guided Probation

Students liable for dismissal will be dismissed or placed on Guided Probation, which requires signing a learning contract that has been developed with an academic support team, including the student’s advisor, the Director of Academic Advising, and others as appropriate. The learning contract, which is placed in the student’s official file, should include some or all of the following elements, tailored to individual circumstances.

  • Regular class attendance
  • Workshops in relevant areas, such as time management, study skills, or note taking
  • Peer tutoring or tutorial help in subject areas
  • Targeted skills training, such as writing, math, or research methods
  • LD testing, if appropriate
  • Regularly scheduled advisor meetings
  • Other support as identified in the learning contract

Students eligible for automatic probation also may choose Guided Probation; there is no obligation to do so.

  Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan in one semester who continues to do unsatisfactory work on Plan may be dismissed for academic failure at the end of the following semester. Students on Plan who are, in the faculty’s opinion, making no significant effort to meet their academic responsibilities may be dismissed for academic failure without the intervening semester on probation. However, such students may instead be asked to do an extra semester’s work, upon notice from the Dean of Faculty.

Part-time students are expected to earn C- or better in all academic work. Those who fail to do so are liable for academic probation or dismissal.

  Appeal

A student dismissed for academic failure may appeal the dismissal through an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Faculty, Director of Academic Advising and the student’s advisor or another faculty member of the student’s choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, such as eligibility for dismissal and/or faculty errors in grading. The ad hoc committee will report to the faculty at the meeting following the meeting in which the action took place, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee.

  Discontinuance

A student may be discontinued (as distinct from “dismissed”) from the College for three reasons: (1) failure to meet the Clear Writing Requirement (see English Discontinuance); or (2) failure to demonstrate adequate progress toward completing a Plan by outlining his/her ideas on a Preliminary Plan Application and to secure a Plan sponsor (see Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance) or (3) failure to complete a Plan of Concentration within the parameters of Extension #1 and #2. (See Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance.) A student on Discontinuance is considered withdrawn from the College for purposes of official reports and financial aid.

Policy on Academic Integrity

Preamble

Process: Faculty Member: Initial Determination of Infraction

Process: Committee on Academic Integrity: Case Hearing

Sanctioning Guidelines

Procedures for Appeal

Membership of the Committee on Academic Integrity 

References

  Preamble

Marlboro College community members have a commitment to living with integrity. The faculty, staff, and students strive to live and learn with honesty and respect for each other and each other’s work. It is the responsibility of all students to inform themselves of the content of Marlboro College’s Statement on Academic Integrity which describes students’ responsibilities in ensuring the academic integrity of their work. This Policy on Academic Integrity explains how Marlboro College deals with student plagiarism, a major infraction against the academic community, and the roles of students, faculty and the Committee on Academic Integrity in that process 

‘Plagiarism’ occurs when a student, with intent to deceive or with reckless disregard for proper scholarly procedures, presents any information, ideas or phrasing of another as if they were his/her own and/or does not give appropriate credit to the original source. Proper scholarly procedures require that all quoted material be identified by quotation marks or indentation on the page, and the source of information and ideas, if from another, must be identified and be attributed to that source. Students are responsible for learning proper scholarly procedures. 

  Process: Faculty Member: Initial Determination of Infraction

Initial Determination

A faculty member will determine whether student work submitted to them constitutes plagiarism, regardless of whether the infraction is deliberate, or arises from student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement. A faculty member may consult with colleagues during the process of evaluating an infraction, but must not identify the student to others.

A faculty member with reason to believe that student work that has been submitted may be plagiarized will meet with the student involved as soon as possible to notify the student of the work in question, to discuss the concern and inform the student of this policy. The faculty member should make a determination of plagiarism within five academic calendar working days. If the faculty member determines that no infraction occurred, he/she will notify the student of that determination, without reporting the suspected infraction to the Committee on Academic Integrity. If the faculty member determines that an infraction has occurred, he/she will decide upon a sanction and communicate that sanction to the student.

Sanctioning Guidelines

If a faculty member determines that the infraction arose as a result of student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement, the faculty member may deal with such infractions individually with the student without reporting the infraction to the Committee on Academic Integrity. In this case the faculty member is encouraged to require the student to resubmit the work.

If a faculty member determines that the infraction did not arise as a result of student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement, the faculty member will fail the work deemed to be plagiarized, and may fail the student for the course, depending on the severity and scope of the plagiarism. In order to aid the faculty member in this determination a record of previous infractions with their penalties will be kept. This record will not contain any information that will identify the student whose work it is but will give a record of the type and extent of the plagiarism and the penalty imposed. This record will be kept by the Director of Academic Advising.

If the sanction will render the student eligible for dismissal, the Director of Academic Advising will refer the case to the Committee on Academic Integrity for a case hearing.

Reporting to the Committee on Academic Integrity

If the faculty member has determined that plagiarism did occur, they will submit the Infraction Reporting Form to the Director of Academic Advising within five academic calendar working days of that determination. This form detailing the infraction, providing documentation, and indicating the sanction(s) will be signed by the faculty member. Infraction Reporting forms will be kept by the Director of Academic Advising in a file until a student’s graduation. If a student leaves the college without graduating he/she has the right to petition the Dean of Faculty to have the file removed after a period of not less than six years. Upon receiving the form, the Director of Academic Advising:

  • will notify the student that the form has been submitted, and offer the student the opportunity to submit a written statement to be filed with the form within five academic calendar working days. If the student submits a statement a copy will be given to the faculty member.
  • will determine if there have been multiple violations. If the student’s file contains at least two Infraction Reporting forms, the Director, in consultation with another member of the committee will initiate a case hearing by the Committee on Academic Integrity.
  • may initiate a case hearing with only one filed Infraction Reporting form that, after consultation with another member of the Committee, is agreed to be a sufficiently egregious case of plagiarism.

  Process: Committee on Academic Integrity: Case Hearing

A student or a faculty member involved in a case may also request the Chair to initiate a case hearing after the faculty determination of whether an infraction has occurred. The case hearing will be scheduled within 10 academic calendar working days of the decision to hold the hearing. A case hearing consists of the stages described below. The Chair will inform the student and faculty member when the Committee commences each of these stages.

  1. The Chair will distribute to the Committee members a copy of the faculty member’s Infraction Reporting Form, and a copy of the student’s statement if one has been submitted.
  2. The Committee will schedule a meeting with the student and with the faculty member separately. The student and the faculty member are entitled and encouraged to bring an advisor with them to their meeting. The advisor may recess the meeting for a short time to confer with the student or faculty member without the Committee present. The Committee’s deliberations will include: a discussion of the facts, a determination of responsibility, and assignment of a sanction other than dismissal.
  3. The Committee will communicate the determination of responsibility and the sanction imposed to the student and faculty member within two academic calendar working days of the last meeting with the student or faculty member. If necessary, the Committee will make a recommendation for action to the full faculty in the closed portion of the faculty meeting, and will communicate the faculty’s decision within two academic calendar days to the student and faculty member. The Chair will place a copy of the communication into the student’s Committee on Academic Integrity file.
  4. If the faculty member’s initial determination of an infraction occurs within two weeks of the end of a semester and timely scheduling of a case hearing process is not possible, or if the faculty member are unable to complete the determination of an infraction within two weeks of the end of a semester, the faculty member will assign the student involved a grade of M and provide the student with a written explanation that the grade is due to a potential plagiarism infraction under this Policy. The faculty member will complete the steps outlined above during the first week of the following semester. If the faculty member is, for any reason, not going to be present in that semester, he/she will designate a proxy to represent him/her in the hearing. If the student is not expected to be on campus then the hearing will take place immediately.

A student may choose not to participate in these proceedings. If this happens the process will go forward as outlined above, without him/her present.

  Sanctioning Guidelines:

The Committee may concur with the faculty member’s sanction.

The Committee may recommend guided probation or dismissal to the full faculty.

In the case of plagiarism on any part of the Work, with affected sections redone acceptably, shall not be resubmitted for examination for one year. Plan sponsors or the faculty may impose additional conditions or requirements.

If the Committee does not find plagiarism to have occurred, the Chair will report this to the faculty member and the student, and will destroy the Infraction Reporting form for the case.

  Procedures for Appeal

Appeal of the Finding by a faculty member

A student has the right to appeal the finding of plagiarism by the faculty member to the Committee on Academic Integrity within five academic calendar working days of the date on which the student is notified by the Chair that an Infraction Reporting Form has been submitted for his/her work. The student must make an appeal in writing to the Chair. The Chair of the Committee or the Director of Academic Advising may also request an appeal hearing on the finding of plagiarism or sanction imposed by the faculty member within five academic calendar working days of that date.

The Committee will schedule an appeal hearing within five academic calendar working days of receipt of a student’s written appeal, or the Chair’s or Director of Academic Advising’s request for an appeal. The hearing will be confidential. The student and faculty member may testify orally and present any evidence in writing they believe relevant to the appeal.

Within two academic calendar working days of the appeal hearing, the Committee will make a decision on the finding of plagiarism and communicate the decision to the student and faculty member. If the Committee finds that plagiarism did not occur, the Chair will destroy the Infraction Reporting Form filed by the faculty member. If the Committee upholds the finding of the faculty member, the file will be retained. The Chair will record such a decision to uphold the faculty finding of plagiarism, and what the final sanction will be in writing in the student’s Committee file.

The Chair of the Committee on Academic Integrity will provide written notification of its decision from an appeal hearing to the student, faculty member, and the Dean of Faculty. The decision of the Committee on Academic Integrity will be final.

Appeal of the Process

The student or faculty member involved in any aspect of the process covered by this Policy has the right to appeal directly to the Dean of Faculty if they believe that the process has not been followed as described. The student or faculty member must make an appeal in writing to the Dean within five academic calendar working days of the date on which they believe a deviation from this process occurred. The Dean, in consultation with concerned parties, will review the application of the process for the incident in question within five academic calendar working days of the appeal request, and will communicate the decision to the student and faculty member in writing. The Dean’s decision will be final.

  Membership of the Committee on Academic Integrity

The Committee on Academic Integrity consists of two faculty members appointed annually by the Dean of the Faculty, two students elected by Town Meeting annually, and the Director of Academic Advising.

In addition to overseeing this Policy and the processes contained within it, the Committee meets regularly to consider regulations of academic policy and issues of academic integrity. The Committee makes recommendations to the faculty either directly or through another committee.

Note: This policy was adapted, in part, from the policy of Willamette University with permission.

  References

  1. Pavela, Gary. “Applying the Power of Association on Campus: A Model Code of Academic Integrity.” Journal of College and University Law 24.1 (Summer 1997) http://www.academicintegrity.org/ai_model.asp.
  2. Office of Judicial Affairs, Duke University, 5 April 2007. http://judicial.studentaffairs.duke.edu/policies/policy_list/academic_dishonesty.html.
  3. Willamette University Policy on Plagiarism, 4 November 2006 http://www.willamette.edu/cla/catalog/2006/resources/policies/

Credit Placement

Advanced Placement Examinations

International Baccalaureate

Field Trips

  Advanced Placement Examinations

The Advanced Placement Program, sponsored by the College Board and administered by Educational Testing Service, offers secondary school students the opportunity to participate in challenging college-level course work while still in high school. Marlboro College will grant up to 4 credits per exam for Advanced Placement Examinations with a score of 4 or 5. No more than 16 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations. Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration. Students should be aware that adding AP or other exam and transfer credits to their record will accelerate their progress toward Plan-related requirements. AP credits are awarded only at the beginning of any semester and generally only through the Sophomore 2 semester; no exam or transfer credits may be removed from the transcript once added. 

  International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is a rigorous course of study leading to examinations. Marlboro College will award credit for higher level examinations with scores of 5, 6 or 7. Each course will be awarded four credits.

Important: No more than 24 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations. Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration.

  Field Trips

Marlboro encourages international field trips and supports efforts to develop them. All international group trips supported by College funds or staffed by College employees are Marlboro-sponsored trips and must be reviewed according to the process outlined below.

Credit for field trips may be awarded only by a regular faculty member or one who holds a continuing appointment, and should depend on the duration of the trip and activities pursued. In no case will a student earn more than 36 credits in one academic year without paying additional tuition. Students who have been enrolled for only one semester of an academic year will be charged additional tuition for any credits in excess of 18.

Trip organizers are encouraged to develop trips that are accessible and affordable to all students. All trips must be self-supporting, paid for with a combination of participant fees and grant funds, where available.

Early in the planning process, trip leaders must prepare a budget in consultation with the Student Accounts office. Following the trip, an expense ledger and receipts must be submitted to the Student Accounts office.

Review Process

Marlboro-sponsored trips that send students to foreign countries go through a review process. The Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students, as appropriate, approves non-curricular components of trips with the assistance of the Committee for Global Engagement. (Trips of 4 days or less may be arranged with the approval of the Dean of Faculty for academic trips or the Dean of Students for non-academic trips. Proposed re-runs of trips that have been approved in the past with the same leaders need not be reviewed by the Committee but may be taken directly to the Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students for approval.)

It is the responsibility of the trip leader to provide the following to the Committee for Global Engagement at least 2 months before departure:

  • A written description of the proposed trip, including dates, itinerary, housing arrangements
  • Maximum and minimum number of students who may participate, and preliminary indication of how many have expressed commitment
  • A description of how participants will be chosen
  • Health and safety risks in the destination
  • Any in-country contacts who will assist the group
  • A preliminary budget, noting sources of funding and cost to students
  • Names of all Marlboro and non-Marlboro staff who will act as leaders.

The Committee for Global Engagement reviews the materials and forwards comments to the trip leader and the Deans within 2 weeks of receiving the proposal. Either Dean may approve the proposal. Approval of a field trip destination does not signify that the College guarantees safe travel. Approval for field trips may be withdrawn should conditions in the destination deteriorate prior to departure.

Pre-Departure Orientation

All international trips must include a pre-departure orientation that includes:

  1. Group health and safety briefing with the Total Health Center (and individual session with each participant to review individual health concerns)
  2. Guidelines for functioning effectively and appropriately in the host culture
  3. State Department travel advisories and information about legal matters in which neither the U.S. government nor the College can intervene
  4. Review of logistics (departure and arrival times, packing list, map, telephone numbers, etc.)
  5. Required documentation (waiver of liability, emergency information, complete itinerary with in-country contacts, photocopies of passports and airline tickets).

The Office of International Services will arrange the orientation in cooperation with the trip leader and will provide all participants with CDC health information and State Department travel advisories for the destination. All participants are required to register with the US Embassy prior to the trip. This can be done on the web at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/. Due to the Privacy Act participants must individually register. The International Office can assist those who need help. Every trip must leave a detailed itinerary with in-country contact phone numbers on file with the Office of International Services (which will distribute copies to the Dean of Faculty, Dean of Students, and receptionist). All participants must be covered by College insurance (or document equivalent coverage), participate in the health and safety orientation prior to departure, and sign a waiver of liability.

In-Country Trip Management

Trip leaders should report regularly (via email or telephone) to the College on the group’s progress. All trips into wilderness and far from medical facilities must include a designated leader with a current First Aid/CPR or First Responder certificate.

Follow-Up

Trip leaders should prepare a report after the trip including suggestions for future trips to the region and in-country contacts who may be helpful. Reports should be filed in the Office of International Services.

Field Trips Within the United States

Faculty intending to lead students on an academic or course-related trip of any length off-campus should consult the Dean of Faculty for guidance. College employees planning non-academic student trips should consult the Dean of Students. Any field trip in which Marlboro students are taken off-campus must be approved by one of the two Deans

Internship/Field Study

Internship

An internship is defined as an experiential opportunity connected to a student’s field of study and is linked to an internship tutorial with papers or projects that document learning. Internships will be identified as such on the student’s transcript.

Credit for internships is only granted through internship tutorials as determined in collaboration with the faculty sponsor, not only for the hours spent in the field. Credit for internships is typically available for SO2s through SR2s and for up to 8 credits over the student’s career at Marlboro.

Students must submit the Internship Proposal Form during registration which will outline the learning outcomes of the internship, the type of duties that will be performed at the site and how the internship experience will be evaluated. (Instructions for registering and obtaining credit are available in the Registrar’s Office.)

Faculty are encouraged to visit with site supervisors to discuss expectations, scope of work and time commitments. Feedback from organization/sponsor should be solicited as part of the grading process. The Office of Career Development is available to assist with any contact with the site placements.

Field Study

Field study is defined as independent research away from an academic setting, not necessarily in connection with an organization or job. The student may gather data or conduct interviews, for example. Field Study can add a valuable “real world” perspective on theoretical issues in a Plan of Concentration.

Like all education at Marlboro, emphasis is on the independent, self-designed aspect of the internship or field of study. In most cases, students leave campus for a semester in order to have a significant amount of time for learning in the field. Students are expected to find their own placements with advice from the Director of International Services, the Director of Career Development and faculty sponsors. The College maintains files of internship possibilities, reference materials, and copies of past Absentia #1 internship proposals in the World Studies Program (WSP) office. Resources are also available from the Career Development Office. The courses Finding an Internship and Designing Fieldwork, are open to all students and can help with the internship search and design process.

Because of the level of independence and self-motivation required, Absentia #1 is recommended only for students on Plan. Arrangements for identifying a work site and getting faculty approval for independent research take a great deal of time—up to one year in some cases—so students should plan early if they are interested in doing off-campus research.

Absentia #1 internships and field study may be designed for any length of time and up to two semesters’ worth of credit. Students who want academic credit for their internships or fieldwork must submit a written proposal to the faculty sponsor(s), who will evaluate the work and award credit. Instructions for registering and obtaining credit are available in the Registrar’s Office.

Study Abroad

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to include study abroad in their academic program. International experience brings many benefits, among them second-language fluency, exposure to global issues, increased self-confidence, and new friends from diverse cultures. Many Marlboro students in recent years have found that such an experience added a valuable component to their Plans of Concentration. There are many ways you can study abroad while at Marlboro:

  • Field trips led by Marlboro faculty: These vary depending on student and faculty interest.
  • Independent research abroad: Plan students may design a semester of independent study abroad and complete credits on absentia status. Absentia proposals must be approved by faculty sponsors and the Dean of Faculty.
  • Study abroad programs through other institutions (such as The School for International Training are also available).

Marlboro accepts transfer credit only from accredited study abroad programs. Representatives from programs where other Marlboro student have studied successfully are invited to campus several times each year to meet with students over lunch in the dining hall. Catalogues and guides to study abroad programs are available from the Office for International Services. The Director of International Services also serves as the College’s study abroad advisor and can offer guidance on choosing a program.

Students studying abroad should consult the Financial Aid office well before departure to ensure that financial arrangements are in order. The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid if a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up with the school through which the student will be taking courses abroad. Institution-based aid (Marlboro Grant) is not awarded for study abroad outside the Absentia #1 model.

Policy For Requests For Foreign Travel On Absentia #1, #3, #4

Marlboro’s mission is to support independent learning and foster a global perspective. As part of that mission, we encourage a variety of experiences abroad. Given the variety of concerns students will face in preparation for travel, we have designed the following guidelines to help students prepare to travel abroad safely.

Marlboro College students often travel to a foreign country as part of their academic program. Students should be aware that the College may restrict travel to places the College deems to be unstable and unsafe. In order to assess safety concerns fairly and completely, we ask that students preparing to travel abroad write a proposal stating their intentions for travel and the precautions they have made to ensure safety. This proposal should demonstrate their awareness of the safety concerns specific to the host community they propose to visit and provide a detailed list of the precautions they plan to take to address these concerns. Students preparing to travel should then schedule a meeting to discuss this proposal with their Advisor as well as the Director of International Services and Director of World Studies.

The following material will be considered along with the student’s written proposal and the completed Absentia proposal:

  • Travel warnings and advisories issued by the U.S. Department of State;
  • Recommendations acquired by contacting the host country’s embassy;
  • Information garnered from other study abroad programs and other relevant organizations, such as the School for International Training, Living Routes, and Peace Corps, as well as the specific organizations the student proposes to work with;
  • Advisories from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization.

When considering proposals from students planning to travel as part of their academic program, the Advisor, the Director of International Services and Director of World Studies will consider the information available regarding the safety of the proposed travel. Marlboro may suspend approval for travel in locations it deems unsafe. Such decisions will be made by Marlboro College’s Dean of Faculty, the Director of World Studies and the Committee for Global Engagement, in consultation with the advisor and the faculty of students whose plans may be affected by such action. A student’s proposed travel to a place listed on the U.S. Department of State warning list will not be approved unless the student and their parents (or guardians) sign an Assumption of Risk and Release from Liability form, and a Special Waiver for Student Travel to “Travel Warning” Regions. Students studying abroad and earning academic credit assume all risks of that travel.

If the College becomes aware, after the initial approval of student travel on Absentia #1, #3 or #4, that circumstances in the host community (or destination) have deteriorated, the College reserves the right to relinquish approval and withhold academic credit.

Summer Academic Work

Students may undertake up to 8 credits of summer academic work with Marlboro College faculty by special arrangement. Charges are on a per credit basis (see Special Fees). Tuition is shared equally by the faculty member and the College. The student must register with both the Director of Student Accounts and the Registrar. Approval is through the Dean of the Faculty. Arrangements must be completed and the Dean of Faculty notified before the final Faculty Meeting of the spring semester.

The faculty member will be responsible for supervising and evaluating the student’s work according to usual academic standards. Upon completion of the summer course, the faculty member must submit a course title, a course description, credit and grade to the Registrar.

Grades

Marlboro College Grade Definition

Pass/Fail Option

Final Plan Grades on the Transcript

GPA

Reporting of Grades and Academic Status

Evaluations of Student Work

Auditing Courses

Deadline for Accepting Student Work

  The College defines its grades as follows:

A =

superb performance; unqualified recommendation for continued work in a particular field

B =

average to good work; a qualified encouragement for continued work in a particular field

C =

acceptable work

D =

unsatisfactory work; credit given toward graduation requirements, but not toward the minimum of 12 credits needed for good standing at the end of each term;

F =

failure, no credit

P =

Pass: equivalent to a C- or better

S =

Satisfactory progress (midterm or progress grade)

S- =

Less than satisfactory progress (midterm or progress grade). S and S- are equivalent to C- or better.

U =

Unsatisfactory (midterm or progress grade)

WD =

Did not complete work after medical leave

WP =

Withdrew from course passing

WF =

Withdrew from course failing

AU =

Audit

I =

Incomplete; temporary grade granted by Dean of Faculty for extenuating circumstances or Dean of Students for medical reasons

NC =

No credit; given in Brattleboro Music Center courses when the student fails to pay fees for lessons

* =

see Senior Grades, below

 

Thus, an A in an introductory course is an unqualified recommendation that a student go on to intermediate or advanced courses in that field. An A on a Plan should indicate a teacher’s willingness to write a letter of unqualified recommendation to a graduate school in that field. A student doing C work may do a Plan in that field if the Sponsor agrees, but he or she should be aware that his or her work will likely be undistinguished.

Uniformity of Grading

No faculty member may use a grading system different from that used by the rest of his or her colleagues, unless it has first won approval by means of faculty vote.

Changing or Appealing a Grade

Grades may not be changed after the final faculty meeting of a term without written permission from the Dean of Faculty. Such permission is appropriate in instances of acknowledged faculty error in determining the grade, where an error has occurred in reporting or recording a grade, or in instances of a belated discovery of cheating or plagiarism on work in the course.

A student who believes that his or her grade in a course is inappropriate must promptly discuss the grade with the faculty member or members involved - not later than the end of the second week of class of the next academic term. If the grade recorded was indeed an error, the faculty member(s) will submit an official grade change form to the Registrar through the Dean of Faculty.

A student who, after initiating such discussion with the grading faculty member(s), believes that the contested grade is unfair may appeal the course grade in writing to the Dean of Faculty, with a copy to the grading faculty member. The letter must state the grounds for appeal, that is the specific alleged unfairness or arbitrariness or departure from College procedures or standards, and must be lodged by the end of the fourth week of the semester following the one in which the grade was given.

The Dean will consult with the faculty member(s) and the student to determine whether the grade should be changed. In considering an appeal, the presumption is that the faculty member has graded appropriately, and clear evidence to the contrary must be established to justify changing a grade. If the faculty member agrees to a new grade, he or she will submit a grade change form to the Registrar through the Dean of Faculty. If the faculty member and the Dean cannot agree, but the Dean is nonetheless convinced that the contested grade is unfair, arbitrary, or inconsistent with College procedures or standards, the Dean may, after reporting the evidence for his or her findings to the Committee on Faculty, enter a new grade with the Registrar over the objection of the faculty member.

Junior Grades

During the first year on Plan, standard grades (A-F) are given in courses and tutorials.

Senior Grades

Seniors may receive progress grades (S, S-, U) or letter grades for Plan courses and tutorials taken in the two semesters of their senior year.

Progress grades appear on a student’s transcript until after the oral evaluation, at which point the Registrar replaces progress grades with asterisks (*) on the transcript. The “*” leads to a statement under the Final Plan Grade: “Applies to all senior year Plan courses and tutorials.” The progress grades of seniors who do not complete their Plans remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

Standard grades remain on the transcript after the oral evaluation (i.e., they are not replaced with asterisks as with progress grades).

The student may choose between progress or letter grades at the time of registration and may change that choice no later than the deadline for dropping a course. The Plan sponsor and instructor must agree where letter grades are specified. Plan courses and tutorials that continue for more than one semester must receive the same treatment both semesters.

Seniors under the cumulative grading system who do not complete their Plan will (for transfer purposes) receive a Pass in courses they have completed at a satisfactory level.

  Pass/Fail Option

After the first semester of the freshman year, a student may register on a pass/fail basis for up to two courses. These courses may not be taken in the same semester. The deadline for registering for a course on a pass/fail basis is two weeks after final registration.

This option is designed to encourage diversity and is available with the permission of the advisor. Advisors should grant such permission only in cases where the proposed course serves to introduce the student to new areas of study.

  Final Plan Grades on the Transcript

Under the heading “Plan of Concentration Description and Evaluation” there will appear on the transcript: (1) a descriptive title and abstract for the Plan; (2) a listing of the individual parts of the Work, along with the associated percentages and the individual grades assigned by the examining committee; and (3) the final or composite grade. (See also Grades under Plan of Concentration.

  GPA

The College does not use grade-point averages, nor does it assign class rankings. Students required to compute the GPA for transfer or graduate school applications should use the following method:

Use assigned letter grades for freshman, sophomore, and junior years and for senior year non-Plan courses; use final Plan grade for Plan credits in the senior year, regardless of whether those courses/tutorials have letter grades or asterisks.

A detailed guide for computing your GPA (“How to Compute Your Grade Point Average”) may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office.

  Reporting of Grades and Academic Status

Grades will be reported to the student. Upon the request of the student, grades will also be sent to parents and/or guardian. It is the student’s responsibility to inform his or her parents of academic progress.

  Evaluations of Student Work

Each instructor is responsible for seeing each of his or her students individually at least once a term, toward the end of the term, in order to evaluate the student’s work. At the student’s request, a summary of this evaluation may be placed in the student’s file.

Written evaluations of a student’s work, in whole or in part, shall be made available to the Dean of Faculty’s Office upon request of the Dean, student, or student’s advisor. This evaluation may remain in the student’s file but will not be part of his or her transcript.

  Auditing Courses

Students may register to audit a course only until two weeks after the final registration deadline. In order for an audit course to appear on the student’s permanent record (grade of AU), the faculty member must notify the Registrar’s Office of the student’s attendance throughout the term.

  Deadline for Accepting Student Work

The student deadline for turning in semester work is at faculty discretion, but no later that 4:30 p.m. on the Tuesday before final faculty meeting. The deadline for the submission of grades will be 48 hours before the final faculty meeting. No faculty member may accept work for the determination of term grades after the final deadline. Work submitted after the final deadline may be considered in faculty discussions concerning action on student performance but may not be used as a basis for changing student grades. The establishment of a final deadline for the submission of work shall in no way abridge the right of faculty members to set deadlines prior to the final deadline or to impose penalties for last submission.

Student Status & Change Of Status

Marlboro students are normally enrolled on a full-time, matriculated basis. The Dean of Faculty may grant requests from returning students who wish to enroll on a part-time and/or non-matriculated basis.

The faculty reserves the right to reclassify as non-matriculated any student who qualifies for dismissal.

In Absentia

Leave of Absence

Medical Leave of Absence

Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Policy of Students who have separated from the College

Exit Interviews

Readmittance

  In Absentia

A student is given this status while living away from campus and, in most cases, working on his or her Plan of Concentration. In Absentia status must be submitted for approval two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term. After this date, the Dean of Faculty will grant Absentia status only in cases of emergency and unforeseeable personal, family or medical hardship, or for reasons beyond the control of the student.

Students in Absentia must be in good academic standing in the semester prior to their departure, and all approvals are conditional on end-of-term standing. The College is not responsible for commitments made by students in anticipation of approval for Absentia status.

A student who anticipates that he or she may not qualify for Absentia by reason of good standing may, with the support of his or her advisor/Plan sponsor, apply for an exception to this policy by submitting a statement of appeal to the Committee for Global Engagement (for international Absentias) or to the Dean of Faculty (for domestic Absentias.) The Committee or the Dean will meet with the student, the advisor, and other faculty directly involved to assess the advisability of allowing the student to participate and will accept or deny the appeal. The eligibility of students whose good-standing is affected by incompletes or missing grades will be determined by the Dean in consultation with the student’s advisor.

There are five types of Absentia:

In Absentia #1

Field work with credit awarded by Marlboro College under the sponsorship of the advisor or Plan sponsor. The student is charged full tuition. Payment is due before the work begins. A student will be considered In Absentia #1 only after payment has been arranged and the registration form, with accompanying program description, has been filed with the Registrar. The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College according to the number of credits undertaken, and may continue to receive appropriate federal and state financial aid. The World Studies Program Internship is a special case of In Absentia #1; additional requirements may apply.

A student who wishes to apply for this status must work out a detailed program of study with his or her Plan sponsor well in advance of the end of the prior semester. This program must identify the academic components, their credit weighting, the work to be submitted for evaluation, and the timing of submission. The work must be designed so that the sponsor can assess progress at midterm and at the end of the term. Work must be turned in by the first Faculty Meeting of the following semester to ensure that full credit is earned. The sponsor may set earlier deadlines. (See Academic Credit.) When a student’s Absentia 1 program of study includes Marlboro faculty other than the Plan sponsor, the student must convene a meeting of participating faculty to review the proposal and assess maters of coherence, feasibility, and oversight. The Plan sponsor may not sign the Absentia 1 paperwork until this meeting has occurred. The World Studies internship proposal review is a special case of this process.

In Absentia #2

This status is granted to a Marlboro student enrolled as a non-matriculated or special student at another accredited degree-granting institution who seeks prior approval for credits to transfer to Marlboro. Prior approval also allows a student to maintain financial aid eligibility. Students must request that official transcripts from the visited institution be sent to the Registrar for transfer credit evaluation. A grade of C- or better is required in order for a course to transfer. Students should not elect Pass/Fail grading if given the option. See Consortium Agreement, below.

In Absentia #3

This is a study abroad status granted to a Marlboro student who wishes to enroll in an accredited (ministry of education approved) foreign institution and have a credit equivalency transfer to Marlboro. Since foreign institutions have different systems for measuring course work, a credit equivalency determination is needed to meet American credit standards. Information needed to evaluate an equivalency includes the length of a term or session, the number of weeks per session or term, the number of contact hours per week in each class, and what constitutes a full-time program at the institution. In addition, a definition of the grading system used and description of the type of official report which will be submitted as documentation of work completed are needed before approval can be granted.

In Absentia #2 and #3

The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid if a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up with the school at which the student will be taking courses. Institution-based aid (Marlboro Grant) is not awarded for in absentia work other than Marlboro’s direct exchange programs. Arrangements for the consortium/contractual agreement are made through the Financial Aid Office.

In Absentia #4

In certain exceptional cases, where a student on Plan wishes to enroll in a non-degree granting unaccredited program which the Plan sponsor and the Dean of Faculty deem equivalent to an accredited program, the student may petition for approval to have Marlboro credit granted by examination. The petition, with supporting detail (academic components identified with credits), must be approved in advance, both by the Registrar and the student’s Plan Sponsor.

The student must submit a document summarizing the program of study before the end of the term preceding in absentia. The fee for credit by examination is $658 per credit. (In unusual circumstances, the rate may be negotiated downward with the Dean of Faculty.)

In Absentia #5

This status is granted to a Marlboro student enrolled in a Marlboro College affiliated study away program. The student is considered enrolled at the full-time tuition rate at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid. Institution-based financial aid is available for In Absentia 5 students.

The student must apply for in absentia status through the Dean of Faculty and must submit the appropriate Plan application and academic registration form before the term(s) In Absentia. There is a $500 administrative fee for In Absentia #2, #3, and #4 status.

Application forms for an In Absentia status are available on the web or outside the Registrar’s Office.

Marlboro College Policy for Requests for Foreign Travel on Absentia #1, #3, #4 (see Study Abroad)

  Leave of Absence

Students in good academic standing (12 credits of C- or better) may apply to the Dean of Faculty for a leave of absence of up to one year. Application for leaves of absence must be submitted for approval two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term. After this date, the Dean of Faculty will grant Leaves of Absence only in cases of emergency and unforeseeable personal, family or medical hardship, or for reasons beyond the control of the student. Leaves of absence are not usually granted to freshmen, nor are they given during the semester, except in special hardship cases. Leaves are normally semester-long but may be granted for up to a year. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) or outside the Registrar’s Office. The applicant must be convinced (and convince the Dean) that the leave is necessary to his or her academic or intellectual development. He or she must have every intention of returning and must anticipate any re-entry problems which may be caused by the leave. Investigation of probable courses available to the student upon his or her return often proves useful. The student should also consult the Financial Aid Office, if he or she is receiving loans or other aid. Completed Leave of Absence forms must be filed in the Registrar’s Office.

To hold a place on their expected return date, students taking a leave of absence must pay a $400 enrollment deposit. Students who withdraw from leave will not receive a refund of the enrollment deposit.

A student who does not return to the College after an absence of one year (on leave or in absentia) will be withdrawn from the College. Once a student is withdrawn, he or she must apply for re-admission through the Dean of Faculty.

  Medical Leave of Absence

A medical leave of absence may be granted by the Dean of Students in consultation with the Medical Staff. A medical leave may be granted for no more than two consecutive semesters, including the semester in which such leave is first granted, before the student is considered to have withdrawn. The Dean of Students has the authority to grant readmission to the College from a medical leave after consultation with the Medical Staff. An approved application for a medical leave of absence is filed with the Registrar. Students granted or placed on medical leave of absence receive a grade of WD (withdrawn) for those courses they do not complete.

  Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Students who do not intend to return to Marlboro after their current semester must complete a Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College form and arrange for exit interviews with the Director of Academic Advising and the Office of Financial Aid, if receiving aid. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) and outside the Registrar’s Office; completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

  Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Students who wish to withdraw from the College after classes have begun (for whatever reason) must complete a Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College form and arrange for exit interviews with the Director of Academic Advising and the Office of Financial Aid, if receiving aid. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) and outside the Registrar’s Office; completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

  Exit Interviews

Students who leave the College (for whatever reason) must complete the appropriate withdrawal forms (see above) and arrange for an Exit Interview with the Director of Academic Advising. This interview is intended to give the College as much information as possible about the reasons for withdrawal and give the student an opportunity to express concerns about any phase of his or her time at Marlboro.

  Policy of Students who have separated from the College

Students who have withdrawn from the College or who have been separated from the College by dismissal or administrative withdrawal are no longer members of the Marlboro College Community. They are expected to absent themselves from campus and to visit only in compliance with the College’s guest policy established by Town Meeting. Any questions about this expectation should be directed to the Dean of Students. Failure to abide by this expectation may adversely affect a decision whether to readmit.

  Readmittance

A student who wishes to return to the College must apply for readmission, in writing, to the Dean of Faculty. Readmission will be determined by the Dean after consideration of the reasons for withdrawal. Readmission will be contingent on settling any past-due accounts with the College. There is no separate fee for readmittance.

Readmission following academic dismissal normally is predicated on 2 semesters of academic work elsewhere at C or better.

Disability Services

Marlboro College encourages academically qualified students with disabilities to take advantage of its educational programs. The College is responsible for ensuring that courses, programs, services, jobs, activities and facilities are accessible and usable in the most integrated and appropriate settings. Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 maintain that no qualified individual with disabilities shall, solely on the basis of his or her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity in higher education.

Accommodations

It is the responsibility of the student to make the college aware of a documented disability and the need for accommodation(s). There must be evidence that the disability substantially limits one or more major life activities related to learning. To allow reasonable time for arranging services, the student should provide appropriate documentation of his or her disability to the College as soon as possible (preferably 4 weeks prior to the beginning of classes or the requested accommodation is needed.) Accommodations cannot be retroactive. Reasonable accommodations are provided to ensure that all students have equal access to the educational opportunities at Marlboro College.

Documentation

Documentation of a disability must follow these general guidelines:

  1. Documentation of the disability must be from an appropriate health care provider (e.g., physician, psychologist, psychiatrist).
  2. Documentation materials must be up-to-date (evaluation of disability must have occurred within the last 3 years), on official letterhead, and signed by the health care provider.
  3. Documentation must include the following items:
    • type of disability;
    • functional limitations that arise from the disability;
    • specific statement of the duration of the functional limitations, as well as any distance limitations;
    • suggested recommendations for effective reasonable accommodations in a college setting.

The College reserves the right to judge the appropriateness, timeliness and source of the documentation materials.

Contact

Students requesting accommodations should contact the Coordinator of Disability Services.

First Year Seminars

All first-year students entering the fall semester at a class status of Freshman 1 or Freshman 2 are required to take a first year seminar. First year seminars introduce students to the three parts of Marlboro Promise and provide skill-building opportunities necessary for academic success at Marlboro. Connected to student life activities, the seminars are united by a common theme, on which the faculty teaching the seminars decide. Students will learn what constitutes a genuine question or problem and how they can address it in a creative and disciplined manner within Marlboro’s curricular model. Some classes and evening events linked to the seminar will introduce students to the variety of support services available (academic and otherwise) at Marlboro College. Students may only take it once, regardless of the result.

The Progression

Preamble

Overview

The Sophomore Portfolio

The Sophomore Review

The Sophomore Progression Meeting

The Preliminary Plan Application

  Preamble

The Sophomore Progression will go into full effect in the Fall of 2017, and will apply to new students admitted on or after Fall 2016. Students who complete their Sophomore year prior to Fall 2017 will be invited, at their own discretion and that of their advisors, to engage in the process described below: to create a Sophomore Portfolio and engage in a Progression Meeting. Until Fall 2017, students and their advisors may still choose to engage in Sophomore Review process as practiced prior to the institution of the policy described below.

  Overview

All students, in the second semester of their Sophomore year, must engage in the Progression in preparation for their transition to the Plan of Concentration. (Transfer students in their Junior year will have until the end of their first semester at Marlboro to finish the Progression.) The Progression will comprise three elements:

  • All students will compile a Sophomore Portfolio (see below) comprising various examples of the student’s academic work and community engagement in the first two years;
  • All students will write a Sophomore Review (see below), assessing the progress they have made in the First and Sophomore years and projecting toward the work they hope to do in the Junior and Senior Years;
  • The Progression will culminate in a Progression Meeting with the student, their current advisor, and a potential Plan Sponsor (or other faculty member teaching in an area of the student’s Plan interest). All students will conclude the Progression having completed, with their Plan Sponsor(s), a Preliminary Plan Application.

For Junior Transfers: Students who transfer to Marlboro as Juniors, and who plan on graduating within four semesters of their admission date, may engage in an expedited process of Sophomore Progression. In consultation with their advisors and teachers, such students should put together a Transfer Portfolio comprised of their work at Marlboro and their prior institution(s). The student’s advisor will be responsible for helping the student to create the Portfolio. It is understood that Transfer Portfolios may contain less material than some Sophomore Portfolios. It will be left to the discretion of the advisor and the potential Plan sponsor(s), within the general guidelines set out below, to determine on a case-by-case basis what a Transfer Portfolio should contain. Junior Transfers should present their Transfer Portfolio and go through the Progression process during their first full semester at Marlboro.

  The Sophomore Portfolio

During their first two years at Marlboro students will compile a portfolio representative of their academic and community life at the college. The portfolio is an opportunity for students to build habits of critical reflection on their learning as well as their engagement in the local and larger community.

The portfolio should include, but is not limited to:

A transcript.

  1. A collection of reflections on the student’s learning and growth in the first two years. This collection should include reflections on growth in particular courses and/or summations of significant experiences, academic or otherwise, in a given semester. Students should work with faculty and academic advisors to develop these reflections throughout their first two years.
  2. Examples, drawn from both the classroom and participation in the wider community, of the student’s growth and engagement. These might include papers or projects produced for classes, articles written for The Citizen or other publication, photos or other artwork, recordings or reflections on performances, or records of significant engagement in or beyond the Marlboro community. In compiling these examples, students and their advisors should take as guidelines the categories that frame the Sophomore Review (see below), as well as the College’s Mission Statement and the Statement of Educational Ideals.
  3. A Resume.

In order to support the development of the Sophomore Portfolio, advisors will guide the process during Dedicated Hour and faculty will recommend to students work that they think should be included in the portfolio. Also, the Director of the Career and Life Path Center, the Assistant Dean of Academic Advising and Support, and the Student Life staff will be available to help students produce portfolios.

  The Sophomore Review

Students at Marlboro are expected during the first two years to study broadly across the curriculum and, in so doing, to develop their interests and areas of focus; they should establish skills and background for the advanced and specialized work a Plan of Concentration will require. Throughout the first two years, students and their advisors will record and reflect on this process in compiling the Sophomore Portfolio (see above). During the second semester of the Sophomore year, students will work with their academic advisors to reflect broadly on the work in the Portfolio and assess their progress, in the form of a written Sophomore Review.

The goals of the Sophomore Review are:

  • To engage in a discussion of the structure and goals of the student’s education at its midpoint.
  • To assess the character and quality of the student’s education during the first two years.
  • To support the values of broad study, international perspective, and good writing.
  • To anticipate the needs of the Plan of Concentration.

With the help of their advisor, students will write their Sophomore Review no later than midterm of their Sophomore 2 semester, in preparation for their Sophomore Progression meeting. The review should reflect on four broad areas, with respect to the student’s education so far, the materials included in the Sophomore Portfolio and the work they wish to do in the next two years:

  • Breadth of study: How have you studied across the areas of the curriculum (Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences)? Have you taken courses that involve different kinds of learning that develop different kinds of skills? For instance, have you taken any courses that involve Quantitative Reasoning?
  • Developing a global perspective: How have you studied a culture outside your own or a foreign language? Have you traveled, or have you worked with people from other cultures?
  • Writing: How have you continued to strengthen your writing since meeting the Writing Requirement? Is your writing ready for the level of written work you propose on Plan?
  • Participating in Community: How have you engaged in work that reflects responsible action in the community? This might include anything from Town Meeting or Faculty Committee service, orientation or admissions work, to a wide range of other community-minded activities. How has the work integrated itself with your academic choices?

  The Sophomore Progression Meeting

At some point during the second semester of the Sophomore year, students and their advisors must schedule a Progression Meeting. The Meeting may be scheduled at any time, at the discretion of the student and the participating reviewers. But the following times will be set aside in the schedule for Progression Meetings:

One Wednesday afternoon in each Fall semester;

  • Two Wednesday afternoons in each Spring semester;
  • The Friday Reading Day at the ned of both the Fall and Spring semesters.

Early in the Sophomore 2 semester, the student, in consultation with their academic advisor, should finish compiling the materials for the Sophomore Portfolio and write a Sophomore Review (see above). The advisor will then schedule a Progression Meeting to include

The student;

  • The advisor;
  • A potential Plan sponsor. (In the event a particular Plan sponsor is unavailable, any member of the faculty may sit in, at the discretion of the student and the advisor. In such cases it is preferable that the alternate faculty member be chosen from the same academic area as the Plan Sponsor.)

To prepare for the Progression Meeting, the reviewing faculty members will consider the Sophomore Review and the Sophomore Portfolio. The committee will discuss with the student their progress thus far both in terms of academics and community engagement. Committee members will discuss the student’s goals for the Junior and Senior years, and together with the student will devise a plan to help the student fill in curricular gaps in the Junior year and prepare for a Plan in their area(s) of focus. The committee will then help the student complete the Preliminary Plan Application (see below), to be signed by the committee members before being forwarded to the Dean of Faculty for review.

  The Preliminary Plan Application

At their Progression Meeting (see below), students will complete their Preliminary Plan Application. This Application serves as the student’s formal entry onto the first year of the Plan.

The Preliminary Plan Application is available online. Students should fill out the Preliminary Plan Application with their advisor(s) before their Sophomore Progression Meeting, and then present it for review, amendment and approval at the meeting. (Students whose potential Plan Sponsor cannot attend the Progression Meeting can obtain the approval prior to the meeting, but the form should also be approved by the attending faculty members at the Progression Meeting as well.)

After the Progression Meeting, the Preliminary Plan Application will be forwarded to the registrar, who will forward it to the Curriculum Committee for approval, then to the Dean of Faculty, who will circulate a copy to the Faculty for review before final approval.

The deadline for completing the Progression is the preregistration deadline. Students will not be able to preregister until they have completed the Progression.

Clear Writing Requirement

General Information

The Clear Writing Program

Procedures for Meeting the Clear Writing Requirement

English Discontinuance

Reapplying After English Discontinuance

  General Information

Clear writing both promotes and reflects clear thinking; it is thus a skill essential to a Marlboro education. The College therefore requires all students to show that they can write clear, well-argued and correct expository prose, to help them succeed in courses and tutorials and, ultimately, in the Plan of Concentration. Students meet this requirement by presenting to the Faculty a 4000 word portfolio within three semesters of matriculation, except as provided below.

  The Clear Writing Program

The Clear Writing Program helps students develop the skills they need to meet the Clear Writing Requirement. Associated with the Program are the resources described below:

The English Committee is composed of the writing instructors and four other faculty members (one from each area of the curriculum). The committee

  • evaluates portfolios (see Evaluation of Portfolios),
  • makes recommendations to the faculty regarding discontinuance and extension of students who have not met the requirement,
  • makes recommendations to the Dean of Faculty regarding reinstatement of students who have been discontinued,
  • recommends policies regarding the Clear Writing Requirement to the faculty,
  • recommends writing and bibliographical handbooks to the faculty,
  • judges submissions in the Freshman-Sophomore Essay Contest.

The Chair of the English Committee is a full-time writing instructor. At the end of each academic year, the full-time writing instructors, upon consultation with the English Committee (and, if necessary, with the Dean of Faculty), decide which of them will serve as Chair in the coming year.

The Chair oversees the Committee’s administration of the Clear Writing Requirement regulations and, in association with the other writing instructors, coordinates the day-to-day operations of the Clear Writing Program. Further, the Chair attends to the administrative details surrounding

    • placement,
    • submission and evaluation of Clear Writing Requirement portfolios,
    • discontinuance of students who have not met the Clear Writing Requirement,
    • examination of the reinstatement portfolios of discontinued students.

The Chair, upon consultation with the English Committee (and, when necessary, with the appropriate Dean), grants exceptions to the regulations governing the Clear Writing Requirement when individual cases warrant.

The Writing Instructors are faculty members whose primary academic responsibility is to teach courses that enable students to develop their writing skills. In addition to serving as permanent members of the English Committee, the Writing Instructors, in concert with the Director of Academic Support Services, appoint and train the Writing Tutors.

The Designated Writing Teachers are faculty members who teach Designated Writing Courses, thus enabling students to work on their writing skills in all areas of the curriculum. Generally, each division of the curriculum provides at least one Designated Writing Course per semester, but no faculty member is expected to teach more than one Designated Writing Course per year.

The Learning Resource Center provides information, workshops, and assistance to the college community in matters relating to study skills, learning and teaching strategies, and learning styles. Accommodations granted under the ADA and Section 508 are made through the Dean of Students office. Students can receive regular academic support tutorials through the Learning Resources Center. These tutorials focus on the development of an effective writing process, strategies for managing large amounts of reading, and organizing time, materials, and ideas.

The Student Writing Tutors are Work-Study students of sophomore standing or above who are selected by the Writing Instructors and trained to help other students improve their writing. The Writing Tutors report to the Writing Instructors, with whom they meet periodically during the semester.

  Procedures for Meeting the Clear Writing Requirement

Orientation Week

During Orientation the writing instructors will meet with all incoming students at the Preliminary Writing Workshop to explain the Clear Writing Requirement and the support available for students who are attempting to pass it. Students are encouraged to ask questions about Clear Writing at the Workshop. The Writing Instructors will also be available throughout the first week of classes to meet with students and their advisors as they plan their approach to writing in the first semester. Students should discuss their plans to meet the Clear Writing Requirement with their advisors in their first advising meeting, before Introductory Classes start. (See “Planning to Meet the Requirement and the Timetable for submissions” below.)

There are no exemptions from the Clear Writing Requirement. All student, must submit a portfolio for the Clear Writing Requirement by the end of their second semester of enrollment.

The First Year: the Writing Courses

Designated Writing Courses (“DWCs”) are regular courses in a variety of disciplines in which students must write at least 4000 words per semester. It is assumed that students in designated writing courses will write several short papers over the course of the semester, so they can work with their teachers on whatever weaknesses affect their writing.

Any course not already designated a writing course may be so designated for an individual student by arrangement with the instructor and the Chair of the English Committee.

Until they are writing at Plan level, students who have passed the Clear Writing Requirement are expected to take one course requiring substantial and regular writing per semester between the time they meet the Requirement and the time at which they submit a Preliminary Plan Application.

Writing Links are 4-credit writing courses that are linked to other courses in the curriculum (usually Designated Writing Courses). Students in writing links draw the content of their papers from their “linked” courses; in the writing link itself they work intensively on the writing of those papers. For the purposes of the Clear Writing Requirement, taking a Writing Link and as associated DWC is equivalent to taking a Writing Seminar. Students taking writing links may also take Elements of Style or a second Designated Writing Course during the same semester.

Writing Seminars are 4-credit, topic-based courses designed for students who need to work intensively on their reading and writing skills in order to meet the Requirement. Students who take a Writing Seminar may also take a Designated Writing Course during the same semester.

Elements of Style is a 3- or 4-credit course that focuses on grammar and style. The course is designed for students who already have a grasp of the basic elements of argument and structure but who need to work further on style. Students taking Elements of Style may also take a Designated Writing Course or a Writing Seminar in the same semester.

  1. Planning to Meet the Requirement and the Timetable for Submissions

All students will meet with their academic advisor in the first week of classes to develop a strategy for meeting the writing requirement within three semesters. The student and the advisor should take into account the student’s score on the writing placement exam, the student’s past experience with writing and the student’s academic interests. The student should plan on taking either a Designated Writing Course or a Writing Seminar in his or her first semester.

All students must submit a portfolio to the English Committee by the end of their second semester (see “Submission of a Portfolio,” below); they are encouraged to submit a portfolio at the end of their first semester. Students who either

  1. do not submit a portfolio in their first semester, or
  2. submit a portfolio but do not pass the Clear Writing requirement in their first semester

are expected to take a Writing Seminar, Designated Writing Course or Elements of Style in each subsequent semester until they pass.

  1. Submission of a Portfolio

A writing portfolio consists of 4000 words of expository writing assigned in Marlboro classes. (See Guidelines for Portfolio Submission below for details.)

Full-time freshmen and sophomores are required to submit a writing portfolio for evaluation by the English Committee by the end of their second semester of full-time enrollment. Students are encouraged to submit a portfolio by the end of their first semester in order to better assess their strengths and weaknesses. Students should consult with their writing instructors and their academic advisors about submitting in their first semester.

Full-time transfer students have the same rights and responsibilities regarding portfolio submission as entering freshman do. Students transferring as juniors or seniors, however, must submit a portfolio at the end of their first semester of enrollment, and every semester thereafter until they have met the requirement. Junior and Senior transfer students who do not meet the Clear Writing Requirement by the second semester of their senior year will not be allowed to work further on Plan until they meet the Clear Writing Requirement.

Part-time freshmen and sophomores must submit a portfolio at the end of the first semester by which they have earned 30 Marlboro credits; they are urged to submit at the end of their first semester. Part-time students whose portfolio does not meet the Requirement in their first submission must submit a portfolio each semester thereafter; if they have not met the Requirement by the time they have accumulated 45 credits, they will be subject to discontinuance.

Part-time junior and senior transfers must submit a portfolio at the end of the first semester by which they have earned 15 Marlboro credits; they are urged as well to submit at the end of their first semester. Part- time juniors and seniors who do not meet the requirement in their first submission must submit a portfolio each semester thereafter. Part-time juniors and seniors who do not meet the writing requirement by the time they have reached “Senior 2” status will not be allowed to work further on Plan until they meet the writing requirement.

Students who submit portfolios as required but do not meet the Clear Writing Requirement by the end of their second semester (or, in the case of Junior and Senior transfers, by the end of their first semester) will be allowed to submit again at the end of the following semester.

  1. Guidelines for Portfolio Submission

Portfolios that do not comply with these guidelines will be disqualified, and students submitting them in the second semester will not be allowed a third semester in which to meet the Requirement.

Content

  1. All papers submitted must be non-fiction, and all must have been written for Marlboro classes or tutorials.
  2. If a paper has not yet been graded by a Marlboro instructor, its authenticity must be validated by the instructor’s signature.
  3. At least one essay must incorporate research. Research papers should show substantial consultation of at least three different sources (not including the primary text(s) the paper discusses); they should also exhibit standard bibliographical form: i.e., either footnotes or parenthetical references, depending on the discipline, and a bibliography or list of works cited.

Page Requirements

  1. The portfolio must contain at least 4000 words of text. Pages of footnotes, bibliography, or charts, are not counted in the total
  2. A student may submit one 4000 word paper or several essays. At least one of the essays submitted must exceed 1250 words in length.

Format

  1. All the submitted essays must be placed in a folder (not an envelope). The front of the folder must clearly display the following information:
    • student’s full name
    • student’s home address
    • advisor’s name
    • student’s class standing (e.g., first semester freshman)
    • number of the submission (e.g., first submission to the English Committee)
  1. All submissions must be printed in an appropriate typeface and dark print, double-spaced on 8 1/2 X 11 inch paper with 1-inch margins.
  2. Each essay should be stapled in the upper left hand corner and the pages numbered.
  3. Each essay must have a title page which displays, in addition to the title of the paper, the student’s name, the course title, the course instructor’s name, the date the paper was submitted to the instructor, and a brief description of the assignment.
  4. Printed papers that have been neatly corrected in ink may be submitted; papers which would be difficult to read because of corrections should be reprinted. If there is any doubt, revise and reprint.
  5. If the submitted essay is reprinted or rewritten, the student must clip it to the original, graded essay.

Evaluation of Portfolios

Portfolios are evaluated by the English Committee, with the assistance of other members of the faculty. No reader may evaluate portfolios that contain papers assigned in his/her class; the student’s papers, therefore, must stand on their own as pieces which can be understood by an intelligent reader in any field. Each portfolio is evaluated by two readers; if evaluations differ, the portfolio is given to a third reader.

One of the two readers for portfolios submitted by students who have not met the Clear Writing Requirement in the previous semester must be a member of the English Committee. All six members of the committee read portfolios of students subject to discontinuance before the recommendation to discontinue is made.

Portfolio Scores

The faculty readers each fill out a Writing Profile Evaluation of the portfolio in which they evaluate, on a scale of 1 to 4, the papers’ rhetorical/conceptual strength, structure, grammar, syntax, punctuation, diction, and bibliographical accuracy. The scale appears below.

  1. Numerous, flagrant problems demonstrate need for immediate remedial study.
  2. The pattern of errors indicates that the writer has an uncertain grasp of indicated elements.
  3. The writing is fundamentally sound, but the pattern of problems suggests careless editing and/or breaches of formal precision.
  4. The papers demonstrate clear and consistent grasp of writing skills. There may be occasional errors in judgment, but overall the papers demonstrate a masterful command of both the subject and the writing.

A score of 3.0 indicates the achievement of writing skills that will allow the student to continue successfully at Marlboro. A score of 3.5 or above indicates that the student is approaching the minimum level of expertise required for Plan.

Results of the evaluation

Students who receive evaluations of 3.0 or higher on their portfolios have met the Requirement, but they should work on problems noted by their readers. These students should continue to take courses and tutorials that require them to write, so that they will not lose their skills as they progress toward Plan.

Students who receive an evaluation below 3.0 on either a first- or second-semester submission must compile a new portfolio that demonstrates their writing progress; to this end, students must take the backup course for which they have contracted. These students are required to submit a portfolio by the end of the next semester.

Second- and third-submission portfolios must contain a minimum of ten pages of writing from the current semester, and the writing included from previous submissions should show signs of substantial recent revision.

  English Discontinuance

All students who have not received an evaluation of 3.0 or better on their portfolios by the end of their third semester are subject to discontinuance upon faculty vote, unless the English Committee, the academic advisor of the student in question, the Dean of Faculty and the Director of Academic Advising jointly recommends a fourth semester and the faculty approves the recommendation.

Students will be discontinued automatically if

a) they do not submit a portfolio at the end of their second semester;

b) they submit a portfolio at the end of the second semester which is disqualified by the English Committee; or

c) they submit a failing portfolio at the end of their second semester but have not taken either a Writing Seminar or a Designated Writing Course in each of their first two semesters.

Exceptions will only be granted if the student receives a Dean’s Excuse, and if that excuse is received by the English Committee BEFORE the portfolio due date. When students are notified of their discontinuance, they receive instructions to help guide them through the reinstatement process. In no case will a student be granted more than a total of four semesters to pass the Requirement.

  Reapplying After English Discontinuance

As the Clear Writing Requirement Contract for Reinstatement indicates, after not less than three months and not more than two years from the date of discontinuance, students who have been discontinued and wish to be reinstated must submit a reinstatement portfolio that consists of ten pages of new writing to the English Committee for evaluation.

To produce their reinstatement portfolios, discontinued students must enroll in a composition course at an accredited community college or college other than Marlboro. Academic credit may be transferred to Marlboro if a grade of C-or better has been earned.

The reinstatement portfolio may also be the product of a private tutorial taken with a faculty member of an accredited community college or college other than Marlboro.

Both the student and the instructor must sign the Contract For Reinstatement. The student’s tutor or composition course instructor must also sign the cover page of each submission in the reinstatement portfolio.

If the English Committee judges the reinstatement portfolio to be of sufficient quality, the student must then take an on-campus writing evaluation to confirm the integrity of the submission. The Chair of the English Committee reads the writing evaluation.

  • If the writing evaluation does not seem to confirm the reinstatement portfolio, the Chair refers the writing evaluation to the English Committee for review. After the review, the English Committee recommends either reinstatement or further discontinuance to the Academic Dean.
  • If the evaluation confirms the reinstatement portfolio, the Chair, on behalf of the English Committee, recommends reinstatement to the Academic Dean.

Students who are readmitted re-enter Marlboro College for one conditional semester. At the end of that semester, they must submit a 4000 word Clear Writing Requirement portfolio to the English Committee for review. (See Submission of a Portfolio.) The ten pages of new writing used in a student’s reinstatement portfolio may not under any circumstances be used in the portfolio submitted to the English Committee for completion of the Clear Writing Requirement.

Students who remain discontinued for 2 years or longer will be considered withdrawn from the College. These students must apply to the College through the Dean of Faculty, who will consult with the English Committee. Students thus readmitted must follow the regular procedure for readmittance after discontinuance: i.e., submit ten pages of new writing, and submit a 4000 word portfolio at the end of the semester.


Plan of Concentration

Credit and Residency Requirement

Definition

Field of Concentration

Preliminary Application

Final Plan Application

Work to be Evaluated & Proportional Weights

Grades, Junior Year

Grades, Senior Year

Tutorials with Non-Members of the Faculty

Oral Evaluation

Honorarium for Outside Evaluator

Duplication Costs

Written Evaluation

Senior Plan Written Assessment

Copy of the Work

Plan Grade

Satisfactory Progress

Unsatisfactory Progress

Extensions

Extension 1

Extension 2

Discontinuance

Reinstatement

Student-Taught Courses

  Credit and Residency Requirement

The Plan of Concentration consists of a minimum of 45 credits and a maximum of 60 credits. Plan credits typically will be advanced work in the student’s area(s) of study.

Normally, students are expected to be in residence during the senior year, although sponsors may occasionally recommend a non residential term. Such terms must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Students are required to register as full-time for the final senior semester.

  Definition

The Plan of Concentration is a two-year, coherent program of study of at least 45 credits, designed by each student in consultation with his or her faculty sponsor(s). The Plan allows students to develop a breadth of knowledge, depth of analysis, sophistication of perspective, and creativity of expression within some area of focus; unlike a traditional major, the coherence of a Plan need not be determined by disciplinary boundaries.

The first year of a Plan is typically devoted to courses, tutorials and associated research that constitute a foundation for the production of the Work by the end of the second year.

The Work represents the educational objectives achieved on Plan; its elements may include a major research paper or set of research papers, a presentation in the performing or creative arts, a set of written examinations on clearly defined topics, a public lecture, or any other effort appropriate to the focus of the Plan.

The elements of the Work are defined and assigned percentage weights on the Final Plan Application. These elements may be arranged and configured in various ways, but at least one element should be assigned a percentage larger than 25% (but less that 50%, except in conditions described below.) The Independent portion of the Work allows the student to demonstrate competence in the Plan area of focus, independent of faculty feedback or guidance. The Interdependent portion of the Work provides students an opportunity to demonstrate their ability to work and communicate with others in the service of meeting shared goals.

  Field of Concentration

The Field of Concentration specifies the area or areas for the Plan of Concentration. The Field of Concentration should be broad enough to encompass most or all components of the Plan of Concentration. It does not need to encompass the scope of a traditional major, although some areas of the study will look more like traditional majors than others. Additionally, each Plan will have a set of subfields that identify the narrower topics of student specialization. In choosing and describing their field, students may use several criteria:

In discussion with their Plan Sponsor(s), students will identify and describe their preferred Field(s) of Concentration. On the Preliminary and Final Plan Applications, students will provide a justification and description of how their chosen Field of Concentration functions as a coherent area of study. This will likely involve reading about how fields and concentrations work at other colleges and universities. In choosing and describing their field, students may use several criteria: There are several criteria that students should use when choosing and describing their field:

  • How does the Field of Concentration describe the student’s expertise to people outside of Marlboro College?
  • What is the body of scholarship that provides a foundation for their academic work?
  • What are the methodological backgrounds that inform the Field of Concentration?
  • What course and tutorial work will provide the basis for the student’s research?
  • Are there programs of study at other universities that the student can point to as an example?

Plans may use recognized categories to describe the field; the faculty specialties represent a list of easily definable fields [link]. For a list of other fields the faculty currently support well, click here.

The faculty member named on the first Plan application is the Plan Sponsor of record for administrative purposes. The primary Plan Sponsor should be appropriately related to the student’s field of concentration as described above. It is appropriate to have co-sponsors if other faculty members make major contributions to the Plan. Visiting faculty and retired members of the faculty may serve as Plan Sponsors only at the discretion of the Committee on Faculty, which may consult with faculty members in related disciplines.

The first year of the Plan normally concentrates on course work in the area of the Plan, leading to a precise definition of the Work at the end of the junior year. The senior year is usually spent in tutorials and independent work necessary for the Work. All current rules for good standing, satisfactory progress and academic probation apply to Plan students.

  Degree Field (valid for students who will be a JR1 or later in fall 2019)

The Degree Field indicates the area of concentration for Plan. A Plan must demonstrate both breadth and depth in addressing a problem or set of problems, but it need not necessarily encompass the scope of a traditional major. Plans integrating two (or more) degree fields may generally be regarded as constituting a single interdisciplinary field rather than a “double major”. However, each degree field listed requires a demonstrable engagement with that field’s materials and methods. Fields must be selected from the list of degree fields (see below) adopted by the Faculty. The degree field may be followed by descriptive specializations, e.g., ART HISTORY/Renaissance Painting; BIOLOGY/Ornithology; HISTORY and LITERATURE /Shakespeare. Students proposing a degree in LIBERAL STUDIES may, with the approval of their Plan sponsor(s), specify interdisciplinary concentrations such as Medieval Studies, Visual Studies, Latin American Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Organizational Studies.(Students considering Liberal Studies please use the new Field of Concentration model above.)

American Studies

Languages

Anthropology

Liberal Studies

Art History

Literature

Asian Studies

Mathematics

Astronomy

Music

Biochemistry

Painting

Biology

Philosophy

Ceramics

Photography

Chemistry

Physics

Computer Science

Politics

Cultural History

Psychology

Dance

Religion

Economics

Sculpture

Environmental Studies

Sociology

Film/Video Studies

Theater

Gender Studies

Visual Arts

History

Writing

 

In addition, World Studies Program students may select the following field:

Development Studies

Students who meet the requirements may also undertake a Plan in Liberal Studies.

The faculty member named first on the Plan application is the Plan sponsor of record for administrative purposes. It is appropriate to have co-sponsors if other faculty members make major contributions to the Plan. Visiting faculty and retired members of the faculty may serve as Plan sponsors only at the discretion of the Committee on the Faculty, which may consult with faculty members in related disciplines.

The first year of the Plan normally concentrates on course work in the area of the Plan, leading to a precise definition of the Work at the end of the junior year. The senior year is usually spent in tutorials and independent work necessary for the Work. All current rules for good standing, satisfactory progress and academic probation apply to Plan students.

  Preliminary Application

This Application serves as the student’s formal request for permission to embark on the first year of the Plan. The first year is normally devoted to courses which lay the foundation for the Work.

The deadline for submission of the Preliminary Plan Application is before the end of the semester in which the student will have earned 55 credits or more.

Any student who does not have a Preliminary Plan Application on file by the end of the semester in which he or she has earned 55 credits must, in the next semester, submit a Preliminary Plan Application at the time of registration. The Application must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Copies of the Preliminary Plan Application are then circulated so that faculty may register any misgivings.

  Final Plan Application

The Final Plan Application specifically defines the specifically defines the Field of Concentration, Descriptive Title, Abstract, and the various components of the Work (see Forms, Final Plan Application). It lists the courses and tutorials to be completed in the junior year and the courses and tutorials projected for the senior year. The deadline for submission and distribution of the Final Plan Application is two semesters prior to the anticipated date of completion of the Plan. Applications submitted at the end of the semester must be distributed to the faculty no later than two weeks before the final faculty meeting. Students who fail to submit Final Plan Applications on time may be required to spend an extra semester at Marlboro before they can graduate.

The Application must first be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Copies of the Final Plan Application are then circulated to all faculty for final approval.

  Work to be Evaluated & Proportional Weights

Technically, all work on Plan is subject to final evaluation. Typically, minor parts are not evaluated; they often provide essential background for the Work or papers, which are evaluated. Major elements must be evaluated: for example, if a student takes three tutorials in Irish History but writes a thesis on the Tudors, an examination or paper (listed under Other Plan Components) should be written on some aspect of Irish History.

Percentages assigned to Plan elements should be roughly consistent with the time spent on each element. Every Plan needs to meet the following (one component may fulfill more than one requirement):

  • One element should be weighted between 25% and 50%; a single element can exceed 50% (up to a maximum of 75%) only with written justification from the Primary Plan Sponsor and permission of the Dean of Faculty.
  • One element of the Work must consist of formal written prose and must comprise at least 20% of the weighting.
  • At least 10% of the material presented for evaluation must be in a form prepared by the student independently of faculty guidance, and all independent work must be available to the Outside Evaluator. Such independent work or examinations normally cover aspects of the major fields of study or areas of the Plan not addressed explicitly by other Plan elements or supporting work. Independent work must be supported by coursework or tutorials taken on Plan.
  • At least 10% of the Work must involve sustained engagement with at least one other individual or organization. This Interdependent Plan component should include: communicating with one or more other people over a sustained period of time; contributing meaningful work to a shared project; and learning about and taking into account the goals, needs, and values of the collaborators in the project. In order to facilitate assessment of the Interdependent Plan component, each student will include a reflection (in writing, podcast, video, etc.) addressing: their role in the project; the goals/needs/values of their collaborators as the student came to understand them; and the particular successes and challenges of the collaboration.

Changes to percentage weights must be made by the Friday before midterm faculty meeting of the final semester on Plan. Changes must be approved by the Dean of Faculty and Plan sponsor(s) and communicated by the student to the Registrar by this deadline. Clarifying changes in wording may be made after this deadline only as deemed appropriate by the Dean of Faculty in consultation with faculty sponsor(s). Students on extension are completing Plans already subject to final modification; no further substantive changes may be made.

  Grades, Junior Year

Standard grades (A-F) are given in courses and tutorials.

  Grades, Senior Year

Seniors may receive progress grades (S, S-, U) or letter grades for Plan courses and tutorials taken in the two semesters of their senior year.

Progress grades appear on a student’s transcript until after the oral evaluation, at which point the Registrar replaces progress grades with asterisks (*) on the transcript. The “*” leads to a statement under the Final Plan Grade: “Applies to all senior year Plan courses and tutorials.” The progress grades of seniors who do not complete their Plans remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

Standard grades remain on the transcript after the oral evaluation (i.e., they are not replaced with asterisks as with progress grades).

The student may choose between progress or letter grades at the time of registration and may change that choice no later than the deadline for dropping a course. The Plan sponsor and instructor must agree where letter grades are specified. Plan courses and tutorials that continue for more than one semester must receive the same treatment both semesters.

Seniors under the cumulative grading system who do not complete their Plan will (for transfer purposes) receive a Pass in courses they have completed at a satisfactory level.

  Tutorials with Non-Members of the Faculty

Students on Plan and their sponsor(s) may arrange for Plan-related tutorials with non-members of the faculty. The Plan sponsor is responsible for notifying the Registrar of such an arrangement at the start of each term, for the evaluation of the work, and for submitting grades. The student is responsible for any additional expenses incurred as a result of such work unless other arrangements are made in advance with the Dean of the Faculty in extraordinary cases.

  Oral Evaluation

The Board of Evaluators consists of the Plan sponsor and co-sponsors, a second faculty member if there are no co-sponsors, and an outside evaluator. Marlboro faculty who participate in major portions of a Plan should be on the committee. The Dean of Faculty appoints an outside evaluator upon recommendation of the Plan sponsor; students are encouraged to suggest names of possible outside evaluators.

At least one week before the oral evaluation, the outside evaluator must have copies of all exams, papers, journals, and other material which constitute the Work with the understanding that the evaluator will typically witness all exhibitions and performances. The outside evaluator should have the opportunity to evaluate all elements of the Plan and must have the opportunity to evaluate at least 90% of Plan work, including all work prepared independently of faculty guidance. However, when a student teaches, performs, or gives a public lecture, the outside evaluator may not be available. Therefore, all independent work, and elements with weightings of more than 10% must be documented for the outside evaluator. Weightings for a public lecture or class teaching must be kept to 10% or less. Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the Dean of Faculty, upon advice from the Curriculum Committee.

  Honorarium for Outside Evaluator

The College pays a $500 honorarium to the outside evaluator upon receipt of an evaluation of the Plan and oral evaluation. This covers travel expenses. However, for outside examiners who must travel long distances or who must make a second trip to the College to view a performance or exhibit, there may be travel funds available. If the outside evaluator must stay overnight, such arrangements and their cost are the student’s responsibility.

  Duplication Costs

The College pays the cost of photocopies of the Plan paper for the library and outside evaluator. If copying is done off campus, the College will reimburse the student for these “free” copies to a maximum of 10 cents/page. Receipts showing number of pages copied, number of copies made of each page and cost must be presented to the Plant and Operations Office prior to reimbursement.

  Written Evaluation

Plan sponsors and the outside evaluator must submit a written evaluation of the student’s work to the Registrar as soon as possible after the oral exam. All written evaluations will be made available to the student and retained in his or her permanent file for future reference.

  Senior Plan Written Assessment

Faculty members who have taught courses in the student’s senior year but who do not sit on the Board of Examiners will submit a written assessment of the student’s work to the Board of Examiners.

  Copy of the Work

All graduating students must submit both a final printed copy and a digital copy of the Work to the Registrar, including appropriate documentation of non-written work. Students are not required to submit undocumented components comprising less than 10% of the Work.

  Plan Grade

Upon the Plan’s completion, the evaluating board assigns a grade which covers the entire Plan.

  Satisfactory Progress

It is assumed that the student will make satisfactory progress on Plan. However, the faculty reserves the right to take action up to and including dismissal for academic failure, upon recommendation of the student’s Plan sponsor and the Dean of Faculty.

  Unsatisfactory Progress

When a student on Plan receives a report of unsatisfactory (U) from his or her Plan sponsor at the end of a semester, he or she will be placed on probation. If, at the end of the following semester, he or she is still doing unsatisfactory work, he or she may be dismissed from the College for academic failure.

When a student on Plan is, in the faculty’s opinion, making no significant effort to meet his or her academic responsibilities, he or she may be dismissed for academic failure. The student may instead be asked to do an extra semester’s work upon notice from the Dean of Faculty.

  Extensions

 There are two kinds of extensions for Plan work that are outlined below. Extensions for Plan work may be granted by the Dean of Faculty. The Plan sponsor must concur. The Director of Academic Advising may be contacted for help working out individual situations.

  Extension 1

For Scheduling Final Plan Evaluation:

If Plan work is complete, an extension of up to three months beyond the scheduled completion date may be granted for scheduling and taking written and oral examinations. There is no fee for this extension.

A student may not choose this category if,

  1. at the end of this semester, he or she has received unsatisfactory grades which would drop earned credits below the minimum of 45 credits required on Plan or 120 credits required for graduation;
    OR
  2. he or she needs further faculty assistance, including reading and commenting on drafts of the Work, regardless of credits earned.

  Extension 2

For Completing Plan Work:

If the student does not complete Plan work on time, and further faculty assistance is needed, he or she must register for further instruction or be discontinued.

(This is valid for the next spring semester for students scheduled to finish in December and for the next fall semester or the intervening summer for students scheduled to finish in May.)

The number of credits may range from 1-18, depending on the proportion of work needed to complete the Plan, and will be set by the Dean of Faculty after consultation with the student and the Plan sponsor. Students are charged on a per-credit basis for any remaining work.

If the work is not completed on time under Extension 2, further extension under Extension 1 is possible. A further extension under Extension 2 is possible, but only if the student submits a new Final Plan Application which the faculty must approve.

  Discontinuance

Marlboro’s curriculum depends on each student forming an individualized plan of study with his or her designated faculty sponsor for the junior year. These plans are expressed first in the Preliminary Plan Application and without it a student cannot successfully progress. Therefore it is part of the definition of good academic standing at Marlboro for students in their junior year to have completed the Preliminary Plan Application in a timely way. Failure to do so may result in the student being discontinued.

If the student fails to complete Plan work on time, he or she may elect to be discontinued by faculty vote. The student may complete (and is encouraged to complete) Plan work while discontinued, as long as the work does not require faculty assistance.

  Reinstatement

If a student has been discontinued in the junior year, the student may be reinstated by vote of the faculty once the student has secured a Plan sponsor and completed a Preliminary Plan Application. Reinstatement may only take place prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to return to Marlboro.

If the student finishes work independently (while discontinued), he or she must be reinstated by faculty vote for the purpose of final evaluation. The student has two years to show satisfactory progress on Plan and be reinstated by vote of the faculty. The student must pay a reinstatement fee in accordance with the current Marlboro College tuition and fee schedule. A student must be reinstated on Plan no later than three weeks prior to the date of Commencement.

If two years have passed, the student must petition the faculty for reinstatement. In this case, new requirements may be imposed.

  Student-Taught Courses

In exceptional cases, where the student has demonstrated mastery of the material, a student on Plan may teach a course for credit at the College under the supervision of the Plan sponsor. Typically, such courses will not exceed two credits. The student teacher must present a completed application including a course description and syllabus in advance of the deadline to the sponsor, then to the Curriculum Committee for review and approval. The sponsor is responsible for evaluating the work of students and for granting credit. The sponsor is expected to monitor the course by meeting regularly with the student teacher and by attending the course at least occasionally.

Students who are not on Plan may participate only in cooperative team-teaching with faculty members. The Curriculum Committee defines “team-teaching” as direct and continuous participation in the course by the faculty member.

The Dean of Faculty and the Registrar must be notified by the supervising faculty member about any course taught by a student.

Research Policy

Research Policy 

Review of Research with Human and Animal Subjects

Review Procedure

Expedited Review

Full Board Review

Classroom Activities 

Final Considerations 

Journalism 

Oral Histories

  Research Policy

Marlboro College upholds the principles of the Belmont Report[1] in assuring that human research subjects are treated with dignity, respect, and consideration for their welfare. All students, faculty, and staff conducting research with human subjects are expected to submit research proposals to the IRB before their research begins. For the purpose of institutional review, Marlboro College defines “research” as a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. This definition includes research development, testing, and evaluation. A “human subject” is defined as a living individual about whom an investigator obtains: a) data through intervention or interaction with the individual, or b) identifiable private information. Faculty are expected to guide students in the selection of topics, research design, the responsible gathering and reporting of data, and ethical considerations. All students who work with human or animal subjects – even when that work is not defined as ‘research’ for the purposes of IRB review (see below) – are required to be familiar with ethical and procedural standards appropriate to their academic discipline(s) and should be ready to affirm that their work with human and animal subjects has been conducted in accordance with those principles.

The College sponsors annual workshops on research principles and practices. Details on IRB procedures, research issues, and sample forms can be found on our website (link to website).

  Review of Research with Human and Animal Subjects

All Marlboro faculty, staff, and students who undertake College-sponsored research using human or animal subjects are required to comply with the guidelines for ethical practices established by their discipline(s), and to submit a research proposal to the IRB, except in the specific circumstances outlined below. “College-sponsored research” is defined as any research conducted for credit or using College resources.

The College retains the authority, as part of its institutional research and assessment, to collect and review data about students, instructors, and staff and will use such data responsibly. Outside individuals and groups wishing to use the Marlboro faculty, staff or students as subjects of research, even in an anonymous survey, are required to submit a written proposal to the IRB outlining the nature and proposed use of the research.

  Review Procedure

Some proposals may qualify for expedited review. The guidelines below indicate which type of review, expedited review or full board review, is appropriate. Contact the Chair of the IRB with questions about these guidelines. Student proposals must have a signed endorsement from a faculty sponsor. Full Board meetings occur on a schedule – research proposals requiring full board review must be submitted a month ahead of the meeting at which the research is to be reviewed. The meeting schedule is listed here: (link to website)

  Expedited Review

The Chair of the IRB, or a member of the committee designated by the Chair, may examine and approve proposals involving the following types of research:

  • Studies that do not involve vulnerable populations;
  • Studies that involve only minimal risk, such as surveys and interviews on non-sensitive subjects;
  • Unobtrusive observation of manifestly public behavior;
  • Participant observation where all participants are aware of the investigator’s role;
  • Survey research in which subjects remain anonymous;
  • Record research where the subjects are not identified by name.

  Full Board Review

Any research activity with human subjects which involves any of the following must go through full review by the IRB.

  • Vulnerable populations as participants (including but not limited to: children, prisoners, pregnant women and fetuses, decisionally impaired individuals, Marlboro College students or college employees, institutionalized individuals, economically or educationally disadvantaged individuals, HIV-positive individuals);
  • Sensitive subject matter - including but not limited to:
    • Sexual orientation, incest, rape, sexual molestation, deviant sexual behavior or attitudes regarding sexual conduct (pedophilia, bestiality, etc.), practices of contraception, abortion, and/or pregnancy;
    • Substance use and/or abuse (including but not limited to: alcohol, marijuana, steroids, amphetamines, narcotics, and any prescription medication legally or illegally obtained);
    • Questions about mental health (e.g. suicide, depression, obsessive compulsive behaviors like smoking, eating, gambling, etc.);
    • The traumatic experiences of an individual, including war or combat experiences of veterans.
  • Risk that exceeds the ordinary risk of daily life
  • Deception
  • Invasive Techniques

  Classroom Activities

Projects conducted solely to teach students research techniques or methodologies are not research, and therefore have a different level of scrutiny. Classroom activities are classified as instructional and not as research – as such they do not need IRB review, if the following conditions are met:

  • The project involves minimal risk to the subjects (i.e. the anticipated risks are akin to the risks ordinarily encountered in daily life);
  • The project does not involve sensitive topics or confidential information that could place a participant at risk if disclosed;
  • The project does not involve people from vulnerable populations (as described above, with the exception of Marlboro College students) as participants;
    • The main concern with students is that they not feel directly or indirectly coerced to participate. In the classroom it is the instructor’s responsibility to make sure that students are conducting the classroom activities in a way that is not coercive.
  • The results of the project will never be distributed outside the classroom and/or institutional setting, or used for publication. Results may be presented to instructors or peers for educational purposes only as part of a class assignment.
  • No one receives financial compensation for collecting, organizing, analyzing, or reporting the data.

  Final Considerations

  1. All research with children under the age of 18 must be reviewed by the IRB. Children are considered a vulnerable research population. They are less able to give fully-informed consent with respect to the research involved. Safeguard procedures and considerations are, therefore, required by the Federal regulations for the review of research involving children. In almost all cases, written consent from a parent or legal guardian must be obtained if the research involves children under the age of 18.
  2. Even in projects not subject to review, the instructor/faculty member is responsible for upholding the ethical guidelines for research in their field.
  3. It is the responsibility of the supervising instructor/faculty member to determine whether projects are subject to review. It is always best to seek consultation from the IRB if a question arises regarding human subjects, research and classroom activities.

  Journalism

Most activities considered journalism – i.e., investigations and interviews that focus on the collection, verification, reporting and analysis of information or facts on current or past events, trends or newsworthy issues – do not require IRB review. For the purposes of the IRB, “research” refers to “systematic investigation[s] designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” While journalists may engage in a systematic investigation, the end result of their interviews is simply reported (or quoted), and synthesis or interpretation of what was said is not offered and no attempt is made to generalize. This differs from research that attempts to synthesize information in order to apply the newfound knowledge to others or for the benefit of others.

When journalists do engage in activities normally considered scientific research intended to produce generalizable knowledge (e.g., systematic research, surveys, and/or interviews that are intended to test theories or develop models), these activities may be subject to IRB review. In such cases student researchers and their sponsoring faculty members should consult with the IRB. Marlboro expects all journalistic projects to be conducted only after training in journalistic methods, and in accord with the Code of Ethics established by The Society of Professional Journalists.

  Oral Histories

The IRB recognizes two types of Oral History projects. The purpose for which information is gathered and the researcher’s approach to conducting interviews determine whether an oral history project is subject to IRB review. Whether or not a project is determined to be exempt from review, ethical principles should govern all research activities.

Idiographic Oral Histories involve information-gathering activities, such as open ended interviews, that only document a specific historical event or the experiences of individuals, without intent to draw conclusions or generalize findings. Idiographic Oral Histories DO NOT constitute “research” and are EXEMPT from IRB review. However, the treatment of participants in oral history projects must conform to the standards of the Oral History Association. For Oral History projects that fall into this category, please complete the Oral History Project Registration Form (a link to the form will be created here) instead of a full IRB application.

Nomothetic Oral Histories are systematic investigations which

  • incorporate data collection (either quantitative or qualitative) and data analysis to answer a research question; and/or
  • are designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge – i.e., to draw conclusions, inform policy, or generalize findings (for example, where knowledge gained from a study might be applied to populations outside of the specific study population).

Nomothetic Oral Histories DO constitute “research,” and are therefore subject to regular IRB review.

All questions about this policy or its applicability to proposed research should be directed to the chair of the IRB.

[1] “The Belmont Report.” Human Subjects Research (45 CFR 46). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. April 18, 1979. Web. Accessed 12/2/2014. http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/belmont.html

World Studies Program

Admission to the World Studies Program

Curriculum Overview

International Expertise

The Internship Process

Assessing Readiness for Internship 

WSP Plan of Concentration

Language Requirement

 Admission to the World Studies Program

Students gain admission to the World Studies Program by submitting an essay in the fall semester of their first year on campus. Students complete the essay in November at the end of a one credit course - the World Studies Colloquium - that introduces new students to the program courses, goals and requirements. In the essay students describe how they intend to fulfill the goals of the program and how those goals coincide with their own for international work and study. Students who transfer into Marlboro in their sophomore year and Marlboro students who wish to transfer in the program in their sophomore year are also required to take the colloquium and submit an essay. In addition to the goals essay these students will be required to explain their plans for meeting all the WSP requirements. Transfer juniors into Marlboro will be required to take a non-credit-bearing tutorial with the Director World Studies before submitting their essay.

 Curriculum Overview

World Studies Program students are expected to gain a general education through the liberal arts and to develop skills as international citizens. These general goals include:

  • an introductory knowledge of world history and cultures;
  • an understanding of contemporary issues of global significance;
  • competence in cross-cultural communication, including proficiency in a second language, recognition of differences in cultural values, and experience working and learning in another culture;
  • a basic knowledge of one world region (geography, economic and environmental systems, culture, and history);
  • a grasp of one or more academic disciplines, and an ability to apply the concepts and methods of these disciplines to a particular problem or issue;
  • an integration of academic and experiential learning, with practical application of academic learning as part of an internship;
  • an ability to communicate clearly in writing and speaking.

 International Expertise

Students in the World Studies Program also seek international expertise as a part of their undergraduate education. Their studies include:

  • An introduction to work in international fields, through the World Studies Colloquium and other events;
  • Knowledge of world history, differences in cultural values, and global issues. An introductory background is offered in the WSP Freshman and Sophomore Seminars. Students may pursue further work in a wide range of courses.
  • Knowledge of a world region. The goal is to learn how to develop a functional knowledge of a region and how different disciplines contribute to an understanding of the multiple dimensions of a single region. Skills in learning about any region can be applied to the area where an internship is located.
  • Contemporary issues of global significance. Students are expected to develop an understanding of contemporary issues and phenomena which have global impact, at least in the area of the student’s individual interest. Faculty sponsors of senior year work are encouraged to include in the final evaluation process some exercise insuring that the student considers the global context of his or her work.
  • Second Language Proficiency. Languages are essential to international work, and WSP students are encouraged to pursue language study throughout their education to discover the significance of language, to learn the skills of language acquisition, and to develop proficiency. Students are required to achieve functional proficiency in at least one language other than their native language. In applying for Plan work, students will review progress in language acquisition with the Plan sponsor and plan any additional language study to prepare for internship, Plan work, and the language proficiency requirement.
  • Access to an international campus. WSP students take a graduate-level course at the SIT Graduate Institute with permission of the instructor. They are also encouraged to participate in networking, social, and extra-curricular academic activities on this internationally oriented campus.

 The Internship Process

The WSP internship, which comprises a major part of the Plan of Concentration, is the means by which ideas and theories studied in the classroom are put to the test of practice and experience in the “real” world. The internship is required of all WSP students and is normally undertaken during the second semester of the junior year. Students live and work in a culture other than their own for 6-8 months. Interns work beside the people of the host country and learn first-hand about their cultural values. At the same time, they develop a greater understanding of themselves as cultural beings. They gain professional skills, improve foreign language proficiency, and gain field experience to incorporate into their academic work during the senior year.

Students design their own internships to fit their individual needs. They conduct the internship search with guidance from faculty and staff. They generally seek positions with organizations doing work in a field related to their academic discipline and to the career they hope to pursue.

Preparation for the internship usually begins in the second semester of the sophomore year, with the selection of an academic discipline and Plan sponsor. The student-sponsor relationship is the keystone for a successful internship. Working in close cooperation the student and sponsor begin to identify long-term learning goals, needed skills and academic preparation for field work and a Plan of Concentration in the chosen discipline.

Two required courses, Finding an Internship and Research Methods, provide the basic preparation for internship. Finding an Internship includes self-assessment of skills and interests, resume writing, interview skills, identification of potential overseas employers, setting goals that grow out of intellectual interests, and writing proposals to fund overseas study.

In the semester before their internship, students must work closely with faculty sponsors in pre-internship tutorials. This requirement can be met in one of two ways:

  1. A one-credit tutorial with the primary faculty sponsor focusing on internship goals and projects and background readings on the internship site.
  2. One credit’s worth of work on internship goals, projects, and background readings folded into an existing tutorial with the primary faculty sponsor. The faculty sponsor must so notify the Director of International Services of World Studies.

In Research Methods, the student writes an internship proposal demonstrating a solid knowledge of the area of the world and the academic discipline in which the student expects to work. Working closely with the Plan sponsor and the Director of International Services, the student establishes learning objectives, designs field projects, and chooses appropriate methodologies to support academic, personal, and professional goals.

While abroad, interns produce independent study projects for which they receive a semester’s worth of credit (12-18 per semester). They are expected to keep in touch with faculty sponsors through monthly submissions of work in progress. In addition, they send back to the Director of International Services three self-evaluations.

Students participating in WSP internships will receive progress grades for all tutorials undertaken during the internship semester. Academic credit for the internship will be awarded at the end of the semester but the letter grade will take the place of a progress grade on a student’s transcript only when the 6-month internship experience is completed. Progress grades must be replaced by letter grades no later than the first faculty meeting of the following semester. The progress grades of students who do not complete their internships remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

 Assessing Readiness for Internship

In addition to an approved Internship Proposal, the following factors demonstrate a student’s readiness to take on the unique challenges that present themselves on internship:

  • good academic standing,
  • awareness of how to maintain health, safety, and well-being,
  • history of working well independently and meeting deadlines,
  • successful completion of internship preparation courses,
  • written job description or some other form of demonstrated understanding by host organization of intern’s role there,
  • adequate orientation to the host country including:
    • knowledge of the language
    • familiarity with the cultural values
    • familiarity with current political and social issues as seen from within the culture
    • interview of a “cultural mentor”

Experience has shown that a number of components contribute to success on internship: preparation, realistic expectations, focused independent projects that are accomplishable in the field, placement in an organization that is related to the student’s Plan of Concentration, regular submission of work to faculty sponsors, and an ability to monitor one’s own progress.

The Program may recommend postponing the internship for the student who needs more time to meet the above criteria.

 WSP Plan of Concentration

Like all Marlboro students, WSP students pursue advanced study in a discipline and independent work addressing a particular issue or set of issues in a field. A WSP Plan of Concentration follows Marlboro guidelines, with these distinctions:

  • A Plan topic with an international or cross-cultural dimension.
  • An internship in another culture, usually for the second semester of the junior year. Internships are intended to provide experiential learning in relation to the general direction of the student’s Plan of Concentration, with these additional guidelines:
    • The internship situation must involve frequent contact and cooperative work with host-country nationals.
    • The internship situation should involve structured activity and some supervision by a resource person in the student’s field of interest.
    • The internship situation ideally includes some contribution or service to the host community.

Re-entry from internship to academic work in the senior year is addressed in a seven-week Senior Seminar. Among the tasks of the seminar is the completion of a statement reconciling the differences between the internship proposal and what the student actually accomplished and documenting the achievement of program goals with respect to the internship. WSP seniors are strongly encouraged to offer a public lecture to build their own presentation skills and to contribute to education on international affairs in the community.

World Studies Program students earn a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in International Studies, awarded by Marlboro College in association with the SIT Graduate Institute.

 Language Requirement

Competence in a foreign language is an integral part of the World Studies Program. To fulfill the World Studies Program language requirement, students must do one of the following:

  1. Pass an oral proficiency exam in a foreign language at the intermediate or advanced level as measured by ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Students must pass the oral proficiency exam one month prior to their graduation date. Testing is arranged through the international office by request of the student.
  2. Successfully complete intermediate (second-year) language study. At least two semesters of this work must occur at Marlboro and must conclude with a grade no lower than a B.

Staff-Taught Courses

The Faculty recognizes that many members of the staff have areas of academic competence that may support a teaching role in our curriculum or in support of the academic work of particular students. Where appropriate, and when such teaching will not impinge upon their staff responsibilities, staff may propose teaching in accordance with the following provisions.

  1. Staff who are members of the Faculty ex officio may teach courses or tutorials in an area of their academic competence.
  2. Staff who are not members of the Faculty may participate in cooperative team-teaching with faculty members. “Team-teaching” implies direct and continuous participation in the course by the faculty member.
  3. Staff who are not members of the Faculty may propose to the Dean of Faculty and the Curriculum Committee teaching a course in an area of their academic competence. Such a proposal should outline the proposed course, with a course description and a syllabus. The proposal should describe the relation of the proposed course to the curriculum and should specify any coordinating work with members of the Faculty. The proposal should also have the support of the staff member’s supervisor. Once the Dean and the Curriculum Committee approve the course offering, the staff member teaching it serves as the faculty of record for that course and may attend closed Faculty Meeting. Members of the staff may offer tutorials only in compliance with college policy on tutorials by non-members of the Faculty.
  4. Other staff with demonstrated mastery in a particular area may teach a course for credit under the supervision of a Faculty member. Typically, such courses will not exceed two credits. The staff teacher must present a completed application, including a course description and syllabus to the Faculty member, then to the Curriculum Committee for review and approval. The Faculty member is responsible for evaluating the work of students and for granting credit. The sponsor is expected to monitor the course by meeting regularly with the staff teacher and by attending the course at least occasionally.
  5. Teaching support staff may offer tutorials to students on Plan in the areas of their expertise. They may offer courses with the approval of the Dean of Faculty in consultation with area faculty and may attend closed Faculty Meeting when offering instruction for credit

All proposals for courses must be made sufficiently in advance for the Dean and the Curriculum Committee to complete their approval process by the deadlines for course descriptions. A previously-taught course, successfully reviewed, may be approved for re-offer by the Dean of Faculty, with the acquiescence of the Curriculum Committee.

Reviews of Staff-Taught Courses

The teaching in all courses is subject to review by the Committee on the Faculty. Courses taught by staff who are Faculty members are reviewed by the Committee. Those taught by staff who are not members of the Faculty are reviewed by the Dean of Faculty, with the acquiescence of Committee. Those taught by staff under the supervision of or in collaboration with a Faculty member are reviewed by the Dean of Faculty with the supervising or collaborating Faculty member, with the acquiescence of Committee.

Master’s Degree

Although Marlboro College’s facilities and resources are limited, our capacity for accommodating the individual interests of strong, independent students, and the particular interest and circumstances of some members of the faculty have occasionally made it reasonable for the College to offer a Master’s degree. These regulations clarify the conditions and requirements under which Marlboro will grant a Master’s degree.

The Marlboro program for the Master’s is designed to supplement and support the College’s mission in undergraduate education, rather than to be an independent program in its own right. The steps outlined below are designed to enable those members of the faculty for whom working with Master’s-level students would represent an opportunity for professional development to do so; these steps in no way confer an obligation upon any member of the faculty to offer Master’s level study.

Program Regulations

  1. Applicants to the Marlboro Master’s program must first write a letter of inquiry to the Dean of Faculty, stating their general interests and background and including a copy of their transcripts.
  2. Through consultation with the Dean of Faculty, the applicant must next find a Marlboro faculty sponsor and co-sponsor to serve on his or her Graduate Committee. The applicant must then submit transcripts, letters of recommendation, writing samples, proposed general course of study, and any other information deemed relevant by the faculty sponsors and the Dean of Faculty. After consulting with other faculty members in their area, the sponsors and the Dean may admit the applicant as a candidate.
  3. With the sponsors’ aid and approval, the candidate must secure from outside the College a third Graduate Committee member, who is an expert in the proposed field of study and whose position or experience qualifies him or her to evaluate Master’s-level work, and who is willing to serve as an Outside Examiner in the final evaluation of the candidate’s work. The outside member of the Graduate Committee may change, with the approval of the sponsors and the Dean of Faculty, as appropriate to developments in the candidate’s work.
  4. Preferably before study begins, but in any case no later than mid-term of the first term of study, the candidate, together with the sponsors, develops a detailed, coherent, and rigorous course of study, which the Committee certifies in writing as appropriate for Master’s-level work. The sponsors circulate the proposed course of study among colleagues in their area or in any related area in which the candidate is likely to study, for comment.
  5. The candidate submits to the Curriculum Committee a description of the proposed course of study, including the field of study and area of the degree; a description of proposed courses, tutorials, and teaching; a description of the thesis and any major related papers; an overall statement of purpose; and supporting letters from the Graduate Committee, including the outside member.

Letters from the Marlboro members of the Committee should comment not only on the appropriateness and feasibility of the course of study, but also upon their own professional interest in supervising it; the outside member should indicate in particular his or her own expected role. The Curriculum Committee reviews the proposal to insure its rigor and that it can be accomplished in a reasonable period, normally from one-and-a-half to three years.

  1. The proposal is then circulated to the faculty, for at least two weeks, with the supporting materials on file for interested faculty members. Faculty members may address comments or objections to the sponsors and the Dean of Faculty; if there are no unresolved objections to the proposal after two weeks, the proposal is considered accepted. Changes in the program of study must be reported to the Dean of Faculty; for major shifts in the program or a change of sponsor, the Dean may require resubmission and re-approval.

Program Requirements

  • Candidates must have completed a BA/BS degree or its equivalent, as attested by official transcripts from the other institution/s.
  • In general, the program of study is defined as 30 credits of course work (in residence) followed by one or two semesters in preparation of the thesis.
  • All work toward the Master’s, whether done independently, in tutorial, or in regular Marlboro courses, is evaluated according to standards appropriate to graduate work, as determined by the sponsors. Courses and tutorials within the plan of study must be passed with grades of B or higher.
  • The program of study must include a comprehensive examination appropriate to the field, normally taken at the end of the second semester in residence. The candidate must ordinarily pass examinations in a foreign language, or math, or technical subjects, as appropriate to the field.
  • The entire program, including thesis and examinations, is evaluated at the end of the program in an oral examination by the candidate’s Graduate Committee.

Fees: Tuition during each term of Master’s work, whether in residency or in thesis preparation, is paid at the rate of 83% of regular, undergraduate tuition. Financial aid is generally available. Some Master’s candidates may serve as interns or teaching assistants, but such arrangements are not assumed to be part of the Master’s program and must be arranged.

Detours

(a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)