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Campus Policies

Policy statements from throughout the college are collected here. 

Policies can also be found on individual college administrative sites, the Staff Handbook, and the College Handbook.

About the Policy

The majority of this policy was approved by the Board of Trustees in the form outlined below in March, 2015. Ministerial changes to the policy (for example, changes to contact information for individuals identified in the policy) have been made at the recommendation of the Title IX Compliance Committee. Changes to certain definitions have also been made in accordance with final regulations promulgated to implement changes to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (“VAWA”). This Policy has been reviewed and revised by the Title IX Coordinator, Dean of Students and Survivor Advocate and Title IX Policy Review Committee during the Spring 2018 term.

The Policy is overseen by the President and the Board of Trustees and therefore must go through one or more of these bodies for approval of substantive language changes. The Policy will be reviewed every three years by a task force comprising of the Dean of Students, the Title IX Coordinator, the Survivor Advocate, and three to five community members (ideally staff, faculty, and students), appointed by the Dean of Students in consultation with the President, Title IX Coordinator, and Survivor Advocate. The Title IX Coordinator’s Committee on Policy and Procedure will assist the Title IX Coordinator and others in making smaller edits as needed that do not affect the policy procedures overall, unless the edits were made to maintain compliance with federal and/or state law.

Academic Advising

Dedicated Hour

Responsibilities of the Student

Responsibilities of the Advisor

Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

Advising at Marlboro is central to the mission of the College: to “teach students to think clearly and to learn independently within a structured program of liberal studies.” Its success depends on three important components: the student, the faculty advisor, and, in support of both, the Director of Academic Advising.

  Dedicated Hour

The Dedicated Hour is one of the advising mechanisms by which students and advisors meet on a regular basis on Wednesdays. Advising groups may discuss academic matters and issues of community import and/or engage in context-related activities. Advising groups contain students from each year, and coalesce around a general academic interest.

  Responsibilities of the Student

The student’s active participation in the advising relationship is crucial to the development and achievement of his or her educational goals. The responsibilities of the student are outlined below.

  • To attend, participate, and engage fully in the Dedicated Hour.
  • To develop academic goals by taking advantage of appropriate college resources such as consultation with the advisor, Plan workshops, the Course Book & Plan Guide, and the Handbook.
  • To become familiar with graduation requirements and all other academic policies as well as to meet all registration and Plan application deadlines.
  • To take responsibility for academic choices.
  • To consult with the advisor concerning changes (adds and drops) to an already approved registration.
  • To consult with the advisor when in academic difficulty and especially after receiving a letter of academic warning at mid-term or being placed on academic probation at the end of the semester.
  • To keep appointments.
  • To change advisors if there is not a good fit or if the advisor is going on sabbatical.
  • To seek additional help from other College resources when necessary.

  Responsibilities of the Advisor

The faculty advisor plays a vital role in the intellectual growth of the Marlboro student. The advisor is not only an experienced guide to the curriculum and the institution but is active in helping the student to set educational goals and to work toward meeting them. The advisor’s help occurs in different ways at two distinct times during the student’s undergraduate years: (1) in the first two years when the student is discovering new avenues of learning, sharpening skills, and building a foundation for advanced work; and (2) in the final two years when the student is on Plan, committed to a narrower and more focused study.

While the advisor is expected to introduce, inform, and offer advice, the most critical part of the advisor’s role is to listen, discuss, challenge, assist, collaborate, and model activities that are a natural extension of teaching. The responsibilities of the advisor are listed below.

  • To facilitate the collaborative functioning of the Dedicated Hour.
  • To introduce the student to the academic program by explaining the principles informing the organization and the aims of the curriculum.
  • To work with the student in planning his or her academic program, paying particular attention to Marlboro’s goals that each student:
    • study broadly each semester of the first two years, including courses in several different disciplines;
    • become acquainted with the interests, methods and teaching styles of as many faculty members as possible; and
    • develop and improve fundamental skills including clear writing, careful reading, critical analysis, and numeracy.
  • To approve the student’s course registration for the semester, including any “drops” or “adds.”
  • To encourage the student to follow the recommendations of the English Committee after the Writing Placement Exam and to help the student understand and prepare for meeting the Clear Writing Requirement.
  • To provide preliminary information about the nature of the Plan and the role of the first two years in preparation for going on Plan.
  • To be available for consultation during posted office hours or by appointment.
  • To encourage advisees to meet with the advisor regularly and to notify the Director of Academic Advising when difficulties arise.
  • To refer the student to other College resources to meet individual needs. Advisors are not expected to be counselors.
  • To assist the student in changing advisors when appropriate.

  Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

The Director of Academic Advising coordinates all aspects of academic advising, including:

  • Assigning incoming students to academic advisors,
  • Working with faculty on agendas for Dedicated Hours,
  • Assisting faculty and students with academic issues,
  • Following up academic concerns raised by faculty,
  • Providing information sessions on the Plan,
  • Overseeing the Peer Advising Program.

Academic Credit

General Information

Credit Load

Class Standing

Dropping a Course

Withdrawing From a Course

Adding a Course

Changing Credits for a Course

Course Repeats

Incompletes

  General Information

One academic credit corresponds to approximately 45 hours of work, inside and outside of class, over the appropriate time period.

  Credit Load

The normal full-time course load is 15 credits. In order to meet the graduation requirement of 120 credits, a student must average 15 credits per semester over 4 years. The minimum allowable load for a full-time student is 12 credits per semester. Entering freshmen and students on academic probation may find a load of fewer than 15 credits advantageous, though signing up for just 12 credits has its own risks.

The maximum allowable load (without additional charge) is 18 credits of active work per semester. Students may register for more than 18 credits only by vote of the faculty. There is a fee for each credit in excess of 18, payable in advance (see Special Fees).

  Class Standing

The following are the number of earned credits generally corresponding to a student’s class standing:

  • 0 credits = Freshman 1
  • 12 credits = Freshman 2
  • 25 credits = Sophomore 1
  • 42 credits = Sophomore 2
  • 55 credits = Junior 1
  • 72 credits = Junior 2
  • 84 credits = Senior 1
  • 102 credits = Senior 2

Please note that class standing is also dependent upon Plan progress and credit distribution, as outlined elsewhere in the academic regulations (e.g., a student may have enough earned credits to qualify as a Senior 1 according to the above chart but not enough credits on Plan, so his/her status may actually be Junior 2). In addition, restrictions apply to credits transferred from other colleges, credits by examination, or credits earned through Advanced Placement. (See also Credit Placement.)

Students receiving VA benefits must consult the Registrar to make sure they are in compliance with VA rules.

International students must consult with the Office for International Services to be sure they are in compliance with their visa status.

  Dropping a Course

Students wishing to drop a course must submit to the Registrar the appropriate form (available outside the Registrar’s Office or on the web; see Forms) signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. Students may drop a course up to 2 weeks (or posted date) after final course selection without the course appearing on the permanent record. Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

  Withdrawing From a Course

If a student withdraws from a course after the deadline for dropping a course, a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) must be assigned by the instructor. Students must withdraw from a course by submitting completed paperwork to the Registrar, at least one week prior to the last day of classes to avoid receiving a letter grade (A-F). Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

Credits assigned to the course will still be counted in the total for the semester but will be considered inactive. Students are permitted a maximum of 18 credits of active course work. An extra charge will be assessed whenever a student is enrolled for more than 18 credits of active course work in a semester. (See special fees.)

  Adding a Course

Students wishing to add a course after final registration must submit to the Registrar, at least one week prior to the last day of classes, the appropriate form signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. (See special fees.)

  Changing Credits for a Course

Students may, with the consent of the instructor, increase or decrease the credits of a course, up to one week prior to the last day of classes, by submitting to the Registrar the appropriate form signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. Faculty reserve the right to change credits through the end of the semester. Other policies may apply for incompletes and in absentia work. Students are expected to maintain accurate registration schedules during the semester. Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

  Course Repeats

Some courses build skills or change in ways that make them repeatable regardless of grades given. Official descriptions for such courses include the statement “May be repeated for additional credit.”

For other courses, the following rules apply: 1) A student may repeat a course for credit, once only, if he/she has earned a grade of D or F. Both courses and their grades remain permanently on the transcript; however, the credits will be earned only in the course with the higher grade. 2) A course with a final grade of Permanent Incomplete (PI), WP or WF will count as one attempt and may be repeated only once for credit. 3) A student receiving an Unsatisfactory Plan grade may not enroll subsequently for the same or similar course if the initial U will convert to degree credits upon completion of the Plan.

  Incompletes

The Dean of Faculty may grant an Incomplete if extraordinary circumstances make it impossible for a student to complete work on time. A family emergency, medical crisis, or outside catastrophe beyond the control of the student may warrant an Incomplete. Incompletes are not granted in cases of time mismanagement or to relieve end-of-term pressures.

(1) A student requesting an incomplete must fill out an Incomplete Request Form (from the Registrar), which lists the work to be completed.

(2) The student must then meet with the Director of Academic Advising to discuss the request and options.

(3) The student must then speak with the Dean of Faculty, who may ask for corroborating evidence of the circumstances that warrant the Incomplete.

(4) Once the Dean has authorized the Incomplete, the Director of Advising will secure the signature of the faculty member in whose course or tutorial the Incomplete is sought.

(5) The faculty member certifies that it is possible for the student to complete the work given additional time and assigns a default grade, should the work not be completed.

(6) Finally, the Director of Advising will submit the form to the Registrar.

Requests for incompletes are accepted only during the week before the deadline for withdrawing from classes/adding credits. All requests must be submitted by the deadline for withdrawing from classes/ adding credits.

Work is to be completed and received by the faculty member within one month from the last day of classes. If work is not completed, the default grade will be entered on the transcript. Faculty members are asked to submit a revised grade to the Registrar as soon as work is completed, but no later than the second faculty meeting of the year. In rare cases, such as when coursework cannot be completed outside of the course or when the original justification for the incomplete persists beyond the deadline, it is possible for the student to receive a Permanent Incomplete.

Academic Dismissal

Academic Dismissal

Guided Probation

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan

Appeal

Discontinuance

  Academic Dismissal

A full-time student who earns fewer than 9 credits at C- or better is liable for dismissal. A full-time student on academic probation who earns fewer than 12 credits at C- or better during the subsequent semester is liable for dismissal and is likely to be dismissed. Dismissal requires a vote by a majority of the faculty present at a faculty meeting. Faculty members are asked to inform the Director of Academic Advising of likely failures at least one week before the end of term. Any student liable for dismissal will be notified before the final faculty meeting whenever possible. The student may submit a statement to be read at the meeting by the Dean of Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, or by the student’s advisor.

Full-time students liable for dismissal but not previously on probation who have made serious efforts to meet their academic responsibilities (e.g., by attending classes regularly, participating constructively, and submitting work as required) are often placed on Guided Probation by faculty vote, rather than dismissed, especially during their first two or three semesters of college work.

Students liable for dismissal who have shown a flagrant disregard for their academic responsibilities are generally dismissed.

  Guided Probation

Students liable for dismissal will be dismissed or placed on Guided Probation, which requires signing a learning contract that has been developed with an academic support team, including the student’s advisor, the Director of Academic Advising, and others as appropriate. The learning contract, which is placed in the student’s official file, should include some or all of the following elements, tailored to individual circumstances.

  • Regular class attendance
  • Workshops in relevant areas, such as time management, study skills, or note taking
  • Peer tutoring or tutorial help in subject areas
  • Targeted skills training, such as writing, math, or research methods
  • LD testing, if appropriate
  • Regularly scheduled advisor meetings
  • Other support as identified in the learning contract

Students eligible for automatic probation also may choose Guided Probation; there is no obligation to do so.

  Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan in one semester who continues to do unsatisfactory work on Plan may be dismissed for academic failure at the end of the following semester. Students on Plan who are, in the faculty’s opinion, making no significant effort to meet their academic responsibilities may be dismissed for academic failure without the intervening semester on probation. However, such students may instead be asked to do an extra semester’s work, upon notice from the Dean of Faculty.

Part-time students are expected to earn C- or better in all academic work. Those who fail to do so are liable for academic probation or dismissal.

  Appeal

A student dismissed for academic failure may appeal the dismissal through an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Faculty, Director of Academic Advising and the student’s advisor or another faculty member of the student’s choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, such as eligibility for dismissal and/or faculty errors in grading. The ad hoc committee will report to the faculty at the meeting following the meeting in which the action took place, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee.

  Discontinuance

A student may be discontinued (as distinct from “dismissed”) from the College for three reasons: (1) failure to meet the Clear Writing Requirement (see English Discontinuance); or (2) failure to demonstrate adequate progress toward completing a Plan by outlining his/her ideas on a Preliminary Plan Application and to secure a Plan sponsor (see Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance) or (3) failure to complete a Plan of Concentration within the parameters of Extension #1 and #2. (See Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance.) A student on Discontinuance is considered withdrawn from the College for purposes of official reports and financial aid.

Academic Fees and Billing

See the Marlboro College website for current year Academics Fees and Student Accounts.

Academic Probation

A full-time student who earns fewer than 12 credits of C- or better is liable for academic probation. Academic probation is automatic at 9, 10, or 11 credits and must be voted by the faculty at 8 credits or fewer (see Guided Probation, below). Students who show a flagrant disregard for their academic responsibilities (for instance, by failing to attend classes regularly or by failing to submit required work) may be placed on academic probation by vote of the faculty prior to the end of the semester.

When a student on Plan receives a report of unsatisfactory (U) from his or her sponsor at the end of a semester, he or she will be liable for academic probation even if he or she earns 12 or more credits at C- or better.

To get off Academic Probation or Guided Probation, a student must meet the minimum requirement for good standing (12 credits of C- or better) by the end of the semester immediately following that which led to probation.

Academic Qualifications

A student may be judged as not making satisfactory progress toward graduation if, as a junior, he or she has not yet embarked on a Plan of Concentration, despite having enough credits to do so. Students should refer to the Standards of Progress and Academic Standing sections of the Handbook for more specific information.

In order to be considered for financial aid, a student must be accepted for enrollment, or be enrolled and making satisfactory academic progress. In general, Marlboro College defines “satisfactory academic progress” as being continued and making progress toward graduation. The College’s financial aid policy for Satisfactory Academic Progress is below.

Academic Standing

In order to be in good academic standing, a full-time student must earn at least 12 credits with grades of C- or better. (See Credit Load.) A full-time student who earns 9-11 credits will be liable for probation. A full-time student earning fewer than 9 credits is liable for dismissal. (See Academic Probation and Disciplinary Action.) A full-time student who has not submitted a Preliminary Plan Application by the end of the first semester of his/her junior year is liable for discontinuance. Transfer students who arrive in their junior or senior year must submit a Preliminary Plan Application by the end of their first semester at Marlboro or they will be eligible for discontinuance. (See Discontinuance and Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance.)

Academic Year

Marlboro College follows a calendar of two semesters each year.

Accident – College Owned Motor Vehicle

Step 1

Dial 911. The 911 System is linked to fire, rescue and police departments.

Step 2

If possible, secure vehicle, position flares at a safe distance from crash scene and display other appropriate warning devices.

Step 3

Ensure passengers remain in vehicle if it is safe to do so or move passengers away from the scene of the collision.

Step 4

Page the Director of Plant Operations at 802.742.1653 and call the Fleet Manager at 802.579.9321

Step 5

Get names and addresses of any witnesses to provide to campus and law enforcement officials. If the accident involves another vehicle, collect insurance information if applicable.

Additional Voluntary Benefits

Voluntary Life, Voluntary Accidental Death & Dismemberment (AD&D), Voluntary Accident, and Voluntary Critical Illness Insurance are available to eligible benefited employees to purchase at the employee’s own expense. Spouse and children are eligible to be covered according to guidelines.

Voluntary Accident Insurance is designed to help covered employees, spouses, and children meet the out-of-pocket expenses and extra bills that can follow an accidental injury, rather minor or catastrophic. Indemnity lump sum benefits are paid directly to the employee based on the amount of coverage listed in the schedule of benefits.

Voluntary Critical Illness Insurance is designed to help employees offset the financial effects of a catastrophic illness with a lump sum benefit if an insured is diagnosed with a covered critical illness. Employees, spouses and children are eligible for this benefit.

Alcohol and Other Drug Policy - FULL

Preamble: Marlboro College has the responsibility as a community to make public and maintain an alcohol and drug policy. This policy must reflect federal and state laws, while also remaining sensitive to the character of the Marlboro College community and the values that this Community upholds. While employees of Marlboro College are held to specific standards and expectations regarding the enforcement of the College’s policy, responsibility for upholding the spirit and the terms of the College alcohol and drug policy is shared by all members of the College community, including faculty, staff and students. Students are adults and are expected to obey the law, and take personal responsibility for their actions. Educational efforts that increase knowledge and understanding will be provided on a regular and ongoing basis by the health center, the psychological counseling office and various academic departments.

Abuse of alcohol and drugs, either illicit or prescribed, threatens individual health, compromises educational development and undermines community integrity. This policy was developed through the joint participation of students, faculty and staff. It has been approved by the President and Town Meeting with the expectation that all community members will be familiar with and abide by the principles and particulars of this statement. This policy will be reviewed biennially by the dean’s advisory committee.

ALCOHOL

Vermont State Law

Vermont State law forbids the sale or serving of alcoholic beverages to persons less than 21 years of age. The law states that it is illegal for a person under 21 to misrepresent his/her age in order to under the influence, to any degree, however slight, of alcohol, drugs, either illicit or prescribed or a combination of the two. The law forbids the sale or serving of alcohol to an intoxicated person.

College Regulations

As required by federal statute, Marlboro College prohibits the unlawful possession, use, distribution or working under the influence of alcohol by students and employees on College property or as a part of any of its sponsored activities.

  1. The sponsors of College social events at which alcohol is served are responsible for adhering to state law and for meeting the general requirements outlined in this policy.
  2. No alcoholic beverages will be served to persons less than 21 years of age at College events or events funded by Town Meeting. Sponsors of events are therefore required to check the ages of those being served alcohol.
  3. Sponsors of College social events at which alcohol is served are responsible for ensuring that the amount of alcohol served does not lead to excessive drinking. The College urges sponsors of such events to keep all alcoholic beverages behind the bar so that only those assigned to pour, do so. The College prohibits serving alcoholic beverages to anyone who is intoxicated.
  4. Sponsors of any College social event that serve alcohol will also serve a nonalcoholic beverage and food, both in an amount that will last the duration of the event.
  5. Sponsors of any College social event that serve alcohol will provide transportation home to individuals requiring or wanting it.
  6. The College forbids the coercion to drink or indulge and discourages any kind of group pressure to drink alcohol.
  7. Individuals or groups that wish to purchase kegs for non-social committee or nonofficial College events at the College (such as a private party in a common room) must register the party with the dean’s office at least two working days before the event. The purpose of the registration process is to ensure that the sponsors of the event fully understand the law regarding alcohol distribution and the serious liability that is involved with sponsoring such an event.
  8. Consumption of alcoholic beverages in the dining hall during mealtimes shall be restricted to the stage area, unless such beverages are served as part of an event registered in advance with the dean of student’s office.
Individual and Community Guidelines
  1. The College encourages application of the specific College regulations and the general spirit of the policy at all privately held events.
  2. In an effort to further the College’s dedication to personal growth and responsible, safe living, the College encourages persons concerned about their own behavior to seek advice or assistance through the resident assistants, the student life advisors, the medical staff (counseling and health offices) or the deans. Furthermore, the College encourages persons concerned about the behavior of another to communicate with the other urging him or her to seek advice or assistance through College support offices. Counseling and medical resources are available on a confidential basis.
  3. The College encourages all efforts to provide education and information regarding alcohol and drug related issues and will publish and distribute local alcohol counseling and guidance resources. The College will arrange transportation when necessary for individuals seeking help outside the College area.
College Action

Alcohol related behavior that causes or can reasonably be expected to cause physical harm to persons, or damage to property, or is unreasonably disruptive will be subject to College discipline through the community court. Individuals found to be in violation of the terms of this policy will be referred to the dean of students’ office, where they will be assessed a fine and required to complete a self-assessment regarding their substance use. Fines for each violation shall be equal to the value of two hours of the state minimum wage. Fines will be paid at the student accounts office. Failure to pay the assigned fine (s) may result in community court action. The funds accumulated from fines will be used to support the sober driver program and to subsidize educational programming.

Violators of the terms of this policy will also be subject to community court action. Sanctions that the community court may impose range from formal warning through fines, community service, suspension, to expulsion and referral for prosecution. Employees who violate the standards of this policy are subject to sanctions levied through the personnel procedures and their supervisors, and these sanctions range from formal warning to termination of employment, and referral for prosecution.

At the discretion of the dean or other appropriate supervisory staff members and in consultation with the medical staff (health and/or psychological counseling offices), individuals may be referred to AA and/or required to seek out other counseling or guidance, or assistance programs off campus.

ILLICIT DRUGS

Vermont State Law

Marlboro College supports Vermont state laws pertaining to the possession and distribution of illicit drugs. These laws prohibit the use, sale or possession of regulated substances without a prescription. In the event that a member of the community becomes subject to legal action for the violation of these laws, the College will review the individual’s status, and will take appropriate disciplinary action.

College Regulations

Marlboro College views the use, possession, manufacture of, distribution or working under the influence of non-prescribed narcotics, amphetamines, barbiturates, hallucinogens, cannabis or other controlled substances as a threat to the health, safety and welfare of the individual, the College community and the educational mission of the College. Abuse of alcohol and drugs, either illicit or prescribed, threatens individual health, compromises educational development and undermines community integrity.

Individual and Community Guidelines

The College encourages individuals needing help as a result of their drug use, to contact a resident assistant, a student life advisor, a member of the medical staff (health and psychological counseling offices), or the deans. Further, the College encourages persons concerned about the behavior of another to communicate with the other, urging him or her to seek advice and/or assistance through appropriate College support offices. Counseling and medical resources are available on a confidential basis.

The College supports all efforts to provide education in the area of drug abuse, and supports individuals seeking help with drug related problems. Information on local drug counseling and assistance programs is available through the health center, and the College will arrange transportation when necessary for individuals seeking help outside the College.

College Action

The College will take action, including requiring individuals to leave the College community and/or get professional help, when situations involving drugs occur in which the individual or the community is adversely affected. Offenses involving the use, possession or distribution of drugs will be subject to disciplinary action by the College, with sanctions ranging from formal warning to expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution.

Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy

Substance abuse is of great concern to the Marlboro College community. Among the many health risks attendant to substance abuse is accidental overdose, physical and/or psychological dependence, organ damage, depression and increased susceptibility to accidents leading to serious injury. Because the College stresses the importance of preventative measures in dealing with any potential health problems, and in order to comply with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the College has adopted the following policy.

The unlawful or improper use of alcohol within the workplace and on all campus property is prohibited. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of illegal drugs within the workplace and on all campus property is prohibited. Such action shall result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment. No employee may be under the influence of alcohol or any illegal drug or controlled substance while in the workplace, while on duty or while operating a vehicle or equipment owned or leased by the College.

College Penalties for Violation of the Policy. Failure to abide by this policy will lead to disciplinary action, which could include:

  • Referral to the Employee Assistance Program for evaluation and treatment, including required participation in a drug/alcohol rehabilitation program
  • Written warning
  • Suspension
  • Termination
  • Referral for prosecution

Legal Sanctions. Employees are responsible for obeying all local, state and federal laws concerning alcohol and other drugs. Legal sanctions, as a result of conviction for unlawful possession, use or distribution of illegal drugs or alcohol, could include fines, community service work, required participation in a local, state or federally approved rehabilitation program and/or imprisonment.

Available Resources for Treatment. The primary interest of the College is in the well-being of its employees. For that reason, we urge any employee who may be suffering from substance abuse or related problems to seek appropriate counseling and rehabilitation immediately. Such counseling is available through the College’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP), through the College’s health insurer and through public and private drug and alcohol agencies throughout Windham County and surrounding areas. The human resources office maintains a list of specific resources. Please refer to the appendix for a more detailed description of College policy regarding alcohol and other drugs.

Alternative Format Books

Students with disabilities who have difficulty with printed material may receive their books and handouts in an alternative format. Eligibility for this accommodation is determined on an individualized basis, and students must be able to demonstrate a substantial visual or learning disability. As it can take many weeks to provide alternative format texts, it is the student’s responsibility to get all relevant information to the Assistant Dean of Academic Advising & Support, as soon as possible after class registration.

Alternative format texts can be requested using this linked form.

Amendments to Academic Regulations

Proposed changes in the academic regulations of the College must be presented to the faculty in writing, with sufficient copies so that all those present at the meeting can read them. Where proposals are for the amendment or elimination of provisions, the text of the regulations to be amended or eliminated, together with all relevant context, must also be presented. Complex or substantial proposed changes should also be circulated one week prior to the meeting in which they will be discussed. This requirement that changes be presented in writing may be waived with the unanimous consent of the faculty. Nothing in this provision is intended to prevent the Faculty Meeting from further amending a proposal so presented.

Appeal Procedure

The complainant or respondent may appeal a Panel’s finding of no responsibility and/or a Panel’s finding of responsibility and/or sanction imposed by the responsible individual by delivering a written statement of appeal to the Dean’s Advisory Committee  [3] (for decisions made by the Dean of Students) or the President (for decisions made by the Chief Human Resources Officer or the Dean of Faculty, as chair of the Committee on Faculty) within five (5) business days from the date of the Panel’s finding of responsibility or the responsible individual’s sanctions decision, whichever comes later. If the President has a conflict of interest, a faculty appeal will be considered by the Chair of the Board of Trustees. The statement of appeal must detail the specific reason(s) for the appeal. The recipient of the appeal will notify the other party of any submitted appeal. The other party may submit a written response to the appeal to the President within five (5) business days of delivery of the statement of appeal. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the formal investigation and/or the Panel’s consideration of the matter; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Investigator, the Title IX Coordinator or the Panel; or (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct violating the Policy. The designated committee or individual considering the appeal shall not conduct a new fact investigation but may consult with the Investigator, Title IX Coordinator, Panel and/or responsible individual, and shall have the authority to affirm, reverse or modify the decision and/or the penalty imposed, or to remand the matter to the Investigator, the Title IX Coordinator, the Panel, or the responsible individual for further consideration. The decision on the appeal is the final appeal available internally at the College. Appeal determinations will generally occur within twenty (20) business days from the receipt of the appeal.

 [3]A student who is a party may request that no students sit on the Dean’s Advisory Committee

Appearances Before the Trustees

A faculty member may request of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees the privilege of appearing before the Board.

Application Procedure

Students must apply for financial aid each academic year. It is the student’s responsibility to complete and return, as necessary, the required forms as noted below:

  1. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Comply with all federal loan requirements, when borrowing educational loans, including completing master promissory notes and entrance counseling and the College’s loan processing form when required.

Appointed Positions

Some positions at Marlboro require an appointment. The Board of Trustees appoints the president and the president serves at the will of the board, subject to the provisions of the bylaws of the College. The president appoints members of the senior staff. Appointments become effective upon confirmation by the board of trustees. The president may terminate these appointments after notifying the board.

Appointments

The President

The President is appointed by the Board of Trustees and serves at the will of the Board, subject to the provisions of the law and the charter.

Members of the Senior Team

Members of the Senior Team are appointed by the President. Appointments become effective upon confirmation by the Board of Trustees. The President may terminate these appointments after formally notifying the Board.

Appointments and Re-Appointments

New Appointments

Terms of Appointment

New Appointments

Re-appointments

  New Appointments

The College subscribes to AAUP guidelines, as follows, on new faculty appointments:

The total period of full-time service prior to the acquisition of continuous tenure will not exceed six years, including all previous full-time service with the rank of instructor or higher in other institutions of higher learning, except that the probationary period will be a minimum of four years, even if the total full- time service in the profession thereby exceeds six years.

The probationary appointment schedule is:

Probationary Years
At Marlboro

Appointment
Schedule

6
5
4

2,2,2
2,2,1
2,1,1

  Terms of Appointment

  1. An initial appointment to the faculty shall normally be for a term of two years.
  2. The initial two-year term may be followed by two successive terms, if the College and faculty member agree.
  3. The two successive terms may be followed by an appointment for an indefinite term. The College incurs no contractual liability for failure to renew any of the term appointments, or for failure to appoint to an indefinite term.
  4. Faculty members on a term appointment for the following academic year or faculty members on indefinite term shall notify the College prior to March 1 if they plan to leave at the end of the current academic year. Otherwise, they are under contractual obligation to the College.
  5. All appointments of part-time faculty who are not tenured members shall be on an annual basis.

  New Appointments

New Appointments to the faculty are made by the President, with approval of the Board of Trustees, after recommendation by the Committee on Faculty. The President and the Dean of Faculty may, in extraordinary circumstances, make faculty appointments of up to one term without prior Board action, but such appointments shall be reported to the Board at the next regular meeting. It is the sense of the faculty that the President should not make appointments contrary to the advice of the Committee on Faculty or of the Dean of Faculty.

  Re-appointments

Re-appointments shall be made by the President, after recommendation by the Committee on Faculty.

Article I: Fire and Safety Commission

  1. The Fire and Safety Commission will be composed of six (6) members: the Dean of Students or their delegate; the Director of Plant and Operations (Maintenance); the College’s Master Electrician; a Fire Chief appointed by the Select Board with the consent of the Director of Plant and Operations; and two Deputy Fire Chiefs appointed by the other members of the Commission.
    1. The Fire Chief shall be compensated by a salary equivalent to a current student employment position consisting of ten hours a week. This will be paid from the Town Meeting budget.

    2. The Fire Deputies shall each be compensated by a salary equivalent to a current student employment position consisting of five hours a week. This will be paid from the Fire and Safety Commission’s fund if the fund has enough money at the beginning of the school year to pay the Fire Deputies for the year and from the Town Meeting budget if the fund does not have sufficient funds to do so.

    3. The Fire Chief will serve as Chairman of the Commission;

    4. The Fire Chief or one of their deputies will be on duty during all non-business hours. The person on duty must be on campus, in Cottage Land, in Whittemore or Red House, or at Marlboro North, and will respond to any fire alarms. The Fire Chief must live in college housing;

    5. The Fire Chief shall be trained in CPR and first aid;

    6. Appointments to the Commission will be made annually in the spring;

    7. The Appointing Authority will have the power to remove for cause or to replace a Commission member;

    8. The Commission may hold open or closed meetings at its discretion;

  2. The Commission will promulgate and enforce the Town Meeting regulations regarding fire, motor vehicles, firearms, and pets;

  3. The Commission will see that adequate fire prevention measures are taken by the Community.

  4. The Commission can submit any case of violation to Community Court. Serious violations of municipal, state, or federal law can be brought to the criminal justice system.

  5. The Commission will review all pieces of proposed legislation concerning fire prevention, motor vehicles, firearms, and pets that are to come before Town Meeting and give its recommendations. The Commission may also initiate legislation.

Article II: Fire Regulations

  1. It will be unlawful to:
    1. Disobey the Fire Chief, their deputies, or members of the Fire and Safety Commission in matters regarding fires, fire safety, or fire drills;
    2. Park within a thirty foot radius of a fire hydrant, or in any other established and posted fire lane;
    3. Tamper with or misuse any fire equipment or electrical fixtures;
    4. Remove or use any fire equipment, including the extension ladders around the Dining Hall, without express permission of the Fire and Safety Commission;
    5. Use candles or any type of open flame burners, or store flammable liquids or chemicals (except alcohol under 100 proof) in dormitories, except when approved by the Fire Chief during an emergency;
    6. Use any electric appliances with exposed heating elements such as space heaters, hot plates, or toaster ovens;
    7. Use any non-metal wastebaskets;
    8. Possess or use all fireworks deemed illegal by the state of Vermont on college property;
    9. Turn in a false alarm;
    10. Cause a fire alarm through negligence or easily avoidable circumstances.
  2. The Fire Chief and their deputies are empowered to enforce these regulations. All violations will lead to the initiation of a Community Conduct process. A determination of guilty in cases under subsection A-H will result in a fine of not less than $50.00 or a work job as the Coordinator or a Restorative Justice conference see fit. Those found guilty of violating subsection I will pay a fine of not less than $150.00 to the Volunteer Fire Company of the Town of Marlboro. Those found guilty of violating subsection J will pay a fine of not less $100.00 to the Volunteer Fire Company of the Town of Marlboro.
  3. Fines accumulated through violations of the fire regulations will be deposited in the Fire Department Fund.
  4. Fire regulations will be posted in each dormitory and members of the Community will be responsible for informing their guests of these regulations.
  5. The Administration and Town Meeting shall institute changes to Fire Regulations to conform to the instruction of insurance inspectors, the State Fire Marshall’s Office, and similar outside authorities.
  6. All fines shall be paid within two (2) weeks of their being levied. If fines are not paid within two (2) weeks, the case will lead to the initiation of a Community Conduct process.

Article III: Motor Vehicle Regulations

  1. It shall be unlawful to:
    1. Exceed the campus speed limit of 10 mph in any vehicle;
    2. Drive off established roads of the campus without permission of the Director of Plant and Operations;
    3. Drive while intoxicated;
    4. Drive a motorcycle or other motorized two-wheeled vehicle on the campus without helmets worn by all persons on the vehicle;
    5. Drive the vehicle of another person without that person’s explicit consent.
  2. It is prohibited for any vehicle at any time to park:
    1. Within a thirty foot radius of a fire hydrant;
    2. In designated handicapped parking zones, except by vehicles displaying handicapped license plates or having a temporary handicap permit issued by the Fire Chief, the Director of Plant and Operations, or the THC;
    3. So as to obstruct or inhibit access to campus buildings or roadways.
    4. Vehicles found in violation of the above regulations may be towed at the owner’s expense.
  3. Students living in dormitories on the main campus shall park their vehicles in either the Back Lots located behind Whittemore Theater or the lot across from Persons Auditorium. Vehicles may be brought on campus for loading or unloading as necessary. In this event hazard lights must be used.
  4. Commuters (students, faculty and staff) shall park in the Lower Theater Lot. The lot across from Persons Auditorium may also be used if desired or in the event of insufficient space in the Lower Theater Lot. There shall be no parking in the Lower Theater Lot between the hours of 3:00 a.m. and 7:30 a.m.
  5. Those visiting the college either through Admissions or on other official College business may park in the Visitor’s lot during the daytime hours provided their vehicles display a temporary visitor’s parking pass. All visitors must check in at Admissions or the Reception Desk. Commuters may park their vehicles in the Visitor’s lot after business hours and during the weekend. No one may park in the Visitor’s lot between the hours of 3:00 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. Vehicles in violation of the above are subject to immediate towing, preferably to the Person’s lot.
  6. Only College owned vehicles may park behind Mather House.
  7. Persons who live in on campus housing whose duties might require their using their vehicles in an emergency (SLCs, Safety Officer, among others) may park near their buildings. Cars displaying Marlboro Volunteer Fire Company license plates may park in any designated parking space on campus. Special permits will be made available to persons (disabled, contractors, etc.) as necessary. These permits will be provided by Plant and Operations or the Fire and Safety Commission. One will not issue permits without notifying the other. The Fire and Safety Commission may authorize other people or entities, such as the THC, to issue permits in its name.
  8. All vehicles will display a college registration sticker in the lower left hand corner of all faculty, staff, or student vehicles.
  9. Fines: Motor vehicles in violation of these regulations may be ticketed by members of the Fire and Safety Commission. With the approval of the Selectboard, the Fire and Safety Commission may designate other community members to enforce these regulations. Fines for each violation shall be equal to the value of two hours of the state minimum wage and will be charged to the community member’s account. Fines are payable to the accounting office. Eighty (80) percent of revenue from such fines shall be allocated to the Fire and Safety Commission for the improvement of community safety. Ten (10) percent of revenue shall be held by the Selectboard, to be used for Work Day projects. Ten (10) percent of revenue shall be allocated to the Plant and Operations, to be spent on improvements to the college van service and for the purchase and maintenance of equipment and supplies. The Fire and Safety Commission shall be responsible for presenting a clear budget to the Selectboard no less than twice a semester.
    1. Registered vehicles: Any member of the community who accumulates more than three (3) parking tickets within one academic year will have all of their vehicles banned from campus. The Fire and Safety Commission will notify individuals in writing that their vehicles are banned from campus, and the vehicles will be banned for 120 days in which college housing is open to all students, beginning on the date of written notification. Upon notification, banned vehicles parked at any campus location other than the Persons Lot may be towed at the owner’s expense or their owners fined an amount equivalent to the cost of towing.
    2. Unregistered vehicles: The Fire and Safety Commission may immobilize or tow any unregistered vehicle.
    3. Members of the Fire and Safety Commission may immobilize, through use of a boot, any vehicle the Commission finds it necessary to tow, as per the regulations in the Bylaws, until the tow truck arrives. A booted vehicle will be clearly marked to prevent the owner from damaging it.
  10. No student may own or maintain more than two (2) motor vehicles on campus.
  11. Vehicles and engines may not be placed or operated in any college building without the explicit permission of the Director of Plant and Operations and the Director of Housing and Residential Life.
  12. Off-campus complaints from residents of Windham County may lead to the initiation of a Community Conduct process.
  13. Individuals contracted to work for the corporation of Marlboro College are considered by Article III to be commuters and staff. Contracted workers are liable for all consequences of their violation of Article III. It is the responsibility of the hiring authority to inform contracted workers of their obligation to these Bylaws.

Article IV: Firearms Regulations

The Plant and Operations staff, in consultation with the Fire and Safety Committee, will establish a clearly marked and advertised Safety Zone.

  1. It shall be unlawful to:
    1. Discharge firearms on college property within the Safety Zone;
    2. Carry or possess loaded or unloaded firearms on college property within the Safety Zone;
    3. Possess explosives or ammunition on college property within the Safety Zone.
  2. Violations of the Statutes of the State of Vermont with respect to firearms, by the students of Marlboro College, may be considered as violations of the Firearms Regulations of Town Meeting.
  3. Disciplinary action for violation of the above regulations may be determined by a Community Conduct process.
  4. The President or their designee may move to immediately bar any violator of the Firearms Regulations from campus pending a Community Conduct process.
  5. Those community members who wish to have firearms may be referred to the Director of Plant and Operations as to where to store their firearms off campus.

Article IX: Guest Policy

  1. For the purposes of this policy, a visitor is any person who is neither a currently enrolled student nor an employee. It is intended that this policy provide a means for regulating the behavior of all persons who may be present on Marlboro College property who are not otherwise subject to the jurisdiction of the Community Constitution and Bylaws or disciplinary processes applicable to students and employees.
  2. Every visitor to the Campus must have a host. All overnight visitors must have a sleeping accommodation in a dormitory room. The host is responsible for the actions of all his or her guests, including visitors who do not stay overnight. No guest may stay overnight on campus if his or her host is absent from the campus.
  3. The host must notify an Office of Housing and Residential Life staff member that a guest will be present and for how long they will be on campus (which includes guests of students in group housing units). Guests are permitted to stay overnight only if all occupants of the room/apartment agree to the visit.
  4. A ten ­day limit for guests will be enforced by the Dean’s Office and the Board of Selectpersons.
  5. The Board of selectpersons has the right to declare any non­member of the community persona non grata and deny visiting privileges to that person for a stated period. For the purposes of this policy, persona non grata means that a visitor has exhibited behavior deemed detrimental to the Marlboro community and thus the visitor is no longer permitted to be present on the Marlboro Campus. Behavior detrimental to the College community includes but is not limited to actions by a visitor which result in offenses against persons or property, disruption of Marlboro processes or programs, violation of a previous legitimate order given by a College official, a continuing pattern of violation of the Community Constitution and Bylaws after notice of the rules has been given, falsification of documents submitted to College staff, or misrepresentation of oneself or of other information to College office or official.
    1. Procedure: A current community member(s) must submit a written statement to the Selectboard re questing a non-community member be declared persona non grata. Upon receiving the request, the Selectboard will deliberate over evidence submitted by the community member(s) in a closed meeting and may consult with said non­member before making a decision. The Selectboard will ensure that anyone declared persona non grata and the community are notified of the decision.
    2. Appeals Process [to Selectboard’s designation of persona non grata]: A current community member may appeal the decision to the Selectboard on th[e] evidence. Should the Selectboard fail to follow these procedures, a community member may bring the case to Community Court. The Court will determine whether the Selectboard followed the appropriate procedure with respect to the evidence. If their process is found inadequate, the case will return to the Selectboard for completion.
  6. Since prospective students are here to see and experience as much of Marlboro College life as possible, the only limitations that may be imposed on them, therefore, must be that they obey the laws of the nation, state, county, and city and the rules and Bylaws of the Marlboro College Community. Should a prospective student go beyond the bounds of what is appropriate behavior, all members of the Community are responsible to inform or remind the prospective student of community rules.
  7. Any non­ community member bound by a court ­issued restraining order against a member of the Marlboro College community will automatically be considered persona non grata by the board of Selectpersons.
  8. During periods when academics are not in session, the President may declare a non­community member persona non grata. Any such action must be presented to the Selectboard at the first possible meeting. Selectboard has the power to review such action.
  9. The current list of people designated persona non grata shall be maintained by the Selectboard and shall be available from the Selectboard and the Dean of Students.

Article V: On-Campus Animal Regulations

  1. For the purposes of this article:
    1. Service animals are defined as dogs (and sometimes miniature horses) that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task an animal has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Animals whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The on-campus rights of service animals are protected under the ADA.
    2. Assistance animals are defined as an animal that works by providing emotional support that alleviates one or more identified symptoms or effects of a person’s disability. An assistance animal is not a pet. The on-campus rights of assistance animals are protected under the Fair Housing Act.
    3. Pets are defined as a domestic or tamed animal or bird kept for companionship or pleasure and treated with care and affection. The on-campus rights of pets are not protected by federal legislation.
  2. Animals will not be allowed on campus, in the cabins, cottages, or student apartments except under the following conditions:
    1. Service and assistance animals will be permitted on campus when deemed a reasonable accommodation for a student by the ADA Committee. When such an accommodation is made the Director of Housing and Residential Life will be notified.
    2. All community members who are required to live on campus as a condition of their status as full time student, employment, or for whom compensation in the form of room and board is required by the financial necessity of the College, may keep pets under the following conditions
  3. Standards of Service and Assistance Animal Owner Conduct
    1. Regardless of the circumstances, the pet owner is ultimately responsible for the actions of the animal;
    2. All dogs must wear identification and current rabies vaccination tags at all times. It is recommended that cats also wear these tags;
    3. All pets must live with their owners;
    4. Visiting pets are not allowed to stay overnight on campus, unless approved in advance by the Fire and Safety Commission;
    5. All animals must be housebroken before arriving on campus. Pets and assistance animals are not allowed inside academic buildings, administration buildings, the dining hall, the gym, upstairs in the campus center, or the library. Any exception to this must be granted by the Fire and Safety Commission. All animals must be on a leash at all times, and all animals must be under vocal command. Under no circumstances are animals allowed to run around outside unsupervised. Dogs may run off leash in the following off leash areas: Zimmerman Field (the Soccer Field) and Maintenance Hill (Below the Visitor’s Parking lot). Pets are not permitted in residence hall bathrooms;
    6. Owners must clean up after their pets;
    7. All dogs and cats must be neutered;
    8. All dogs must be licensed by the Town of Marlboro;
    9. Maintenance staff may choose to not enter a room if a pet is inside. Pet owners should call the Maintenance Department to make arrangements in this case.
    10. Owner negligence or mistreatment of an animal will not be tolerated. In the case of negligence or mistreatment, the Fire and Safety Commission reserves the right to place owners on probation or remove animals from the care of the owner if needed. The Fire and Safety Commission will have the authority to remove any animal left unattended for more than twenty four (24) hours, except in instances where the animal’s life is in immediate danger. In those instances, the Fire and Safety Commission may remove the animal immediately. The Fire and Safety Commission will work with the Animal Control Officer of the Town of Marlboro in cases where an animal may need to be removed from campus and/or to investigate cases of abuse and/or neglect.
    11. Animals attacking other animals or humans will not be tolerated. The Fire and Safety Commission reserves the right to ban animals from campus in the case of violent behavior toward other animals or humans.
    12. Failure to comply with this policy and/or requests of the Fire and Safety Commission may result in a $300 fine, a Community Conduct process, or additional action deemed necessary by the College. All fines collected for violation of these standards will be contributed to the Shelter Fund or the Windham County Humane Society.
    13. The Fire and Safety Commission must be informed before the pets appear on campus;
    14. Any community member wishing to lodge a complaint concerning an on-campus animal based on health hazards, property damage, annoyance, neglect, abuse, or failure to comply with the above conditions should bring those complaints to the Fire and Safety Commission on an individual basis.
  4. Off-campus students, staff, and faculty members who occasionally must bring their pets on campus must first obtain clearance from the Fire and Safety Commission. They must maintain the pet under direct control whenever the pet is on campus. The privilege of bringing a pet to campus granted to off-campus students, faculty, and staff may be revoked if the behavior or presence of the pet is judged by the Fire and Safety Commission to be a nuisance.

Article VI: Dining Hall

The Dining Hall Crew Chief(s), hired by the Selectboard, will be responsible for ensuring that the dining hall is a healthy and welcoming place in which to eat. This includes maintaining a system for the return of dishes, mugs and so on that are taken from the Dining Hall. The Crew Chief(s) will serve one semester. The Chief(s) will be supervised by the Selectboard and paid $2000 per semester ($975 from the Town Meeting Budget and $1025 from the Alumni/Development Office).

  1. One Chief must be on duty after every scheduled meal in the dining hall. In the event that a Crew Chief is not available to supervise the cleaning of the Dining Hall after a meal, they must designate a replacement. This replacement will be compensated by the Crew Chief(s).

  2. The Chief on duty may solicit participation in the cleaning from members of the community. This may be done in any manner the Crew Chief(s) sees fit except by illegal or immoral means. The Chief(s) may form and maintain dining hall crews appointed from all students on meal plan, staff, and faculty. Exceptions may be made at the discretion of the Crew Chief.

  3. If the Chief(s) choose to assign students on meal plan, staff, or faculty to dining hall crew duty, they must inform them in writing (email is also acceptable) at least one week before they are expected to serve. Additional notification measures may be used and are encouraged.

  4. The Crew Chief(s) on duty is expected to educate those who are cleaning about the location of cleaning equipment and the cleaning routine.

  5. The Crew Chief(s) are required to meet with Selectboard on a monthly basis to ensure successful completion of the position’s requirements. It is a responsibility of the position to arrange that meeting.

  6. The Crew Chief(s) is ultimately responsible for meeting these requirements and the requirements listed under section D of this article.

C. Seniors on plan are exempt from serving on Dining Hall Crew. However, seniors who missed their shift when they were second semester juniors will still be responsible for making up the shift as described in Section D, clause 5.

D. Crew Responsibilities:

    1. The Dining Hall Crew must begin cleaning the dining hall no later than fifteen (15) minutes after every meal;

    2. Every dining table must be cleared of dishes and trash and wiped down with warm water and a cleaning solution such as soap or bleach. Personal belongings left in the dining area should be placed on the lost and found table. All chairs should be pushed in and the room should be generally tidy;

    3. The Dining Hall Crew is responsible for collecting and replacing dish-bins from various locations around campus as directed by the Crew Chief.
    4. After some meals, hired or work study crews clean the dining hall floors. After these meals, the Dining Hall Crew shall gather up the salt and pepper shakers and stack all folding chairs on the dining tables;

    5. The Dining Hall Crew is not responsible for cleaning the dining hall after community dinners and other community activities held in the dining hall;

    6. Community members who do not come to their shift during a semester are responsible for making up the shift within two weeks time while classes are in session according to the official Academic Calendar. Their responsibilities will be determined by the sensible discretion of the Crew Chief(s);

    7. If a Community member fails to make up their shift as described in Article VI, Section D, clause 5, they will be subject to a penalty of three (3) hours of community service.

      1. Penalties outlined in this clause may be appealed to the Community Court through the Public Advocate or Coordinator of Student Conduct.

E. Use of the dining hall for community activities must be cleared with the Dining Hall Crew Chief(s). A sponsor for the activity must sign up with the Chief(s) to secure the time and to insure that an organized group will set up before and clean up after the activity.

Article VII: Library Regulations

  1. In order to ensure the most fair and efficient use of the Library’s resources, the following types of library materials will not circulate and must remain within the library building at all times:
    1. Periodicals;
    2. Reference books;
    3. Student plans;
    4. Individually specified items in the Special Collections.
  2. Library users are expected to respect the needs of others for a clean, quiet, study environment. People using any of the Library’s facilities should not infringe on the rights of others by creating undue or inappropriate noise and clutter.

Article VIII: Rooming Policy

  1. Only with the consent of all parties will roommates of differing gender identities or sexes be allowed to live together.
  2. Marlboro College will not assign incoming students, to live with roommates of differing gender identities or sexes , unless they are married or have been granted permission to live together in student apartments or at the discretion of the Director of Housing and Residential Life.
    1. Definition of terms: A gender identity is the way in which an individual self identifies with a gender category, for example, as being either male, female, transgender or in some cases choosing not to specify, which can be distinct from biological sex.
  3. Rooming Priority
    1. Priority for dormitory room assignments will be determined by the following:
      1. Seniors with final plan applications on file;
      2. Students with preliminary plan applications on file;
      3. Credits toward graduation;
      4. By lot within categories, priority shall be determined by credits toward graduation.
    2. Priority for group housing units shall be determined by the sum of credits of the applying group. Credits of students in excess of the minimum occupancy for any unit will not count in determining priority.
    3. Priority for group housing units will be given according to the following order of general guidelines:
      1. Married students (or students w/children);
      2. Married faculty (or faculty w/children);
      3. Faculty Fellows;
      4. Single students;
      5. Single faculty.

    4. Prospective tenants may be reviewed by the Housing Committee with respect to their suitability.

  4. All campus accommodations for students returning to campus during the fall semester will be assigned anew in the spring semester prior to that academic year. Students will be required to submit the appropriate housing form to the Director of Housing and Residential Life by the established deadline. Forms submitted after the deadline established by the Director of Housing and Residential Life will result in the loss of priority.

  5. Students who will be on absentia (or will be on another type of leave) for the fall semester will be provided instructions on how to request on campus housing from the Director of Housing and Residential Life.

  6. Should students find themselves the single occupant of a double room (any room designated as such by the Administration prior to the student’s occupancy of it) for any reason during the year, they should reasonably assume that they will have a roommate the following term. During the course of the term in which they find themselves single in a double accommodation, the Administration may, at its discretion and based on priority, move another student into the room to fill the extra bed or ask the occupant to move to another room. Changes of this sort will be subject to appeal and review by the Housing Committee

  7. During the semester, room changes may be effected with the consent of all parties and the Director of Housing and Residential Life.

  8. Room changes need to be completed by the deadlines provided to the student(s) by the Director of Housing and Residential Life. Vacated rooms must be cleaned and readied upon moving out of the old room and prior to the new occupant(s) moving in. The College will not be responsible for personal belongings left in a room after the deadline for moving out.

  9. Each year the Housing Committee will designate housing to meet the needs of students

  10. Variances to the rooming policy may be made by the Housing Committee.

  11. Within the first two weeks of each semester, each dormitory is responsible for creating a dormitory charter. These charters shall:

    1. Be considered an extension of the Town Meeting Bylaws.

    2. Be clearly posted in their most recent versions near the entrances of the dormitory to which they apply.

    3. Be limited in scope and jurisdiction to actions within the dormitory and immediate vicinity.

Article X: Town Meeting Scholarships

  1. Definitions and Responsibilities
    1. Governance: The Committee on the Town Meeting Scholarship Fund (herein “the Committee”) will manage the Town Meeting Scholarship Fund (TMSF). The Committee will consist of five members. Three members will serve one year terms beginning after the final faculty meeting of the fall term. Two shall serve one year terms beginning following the Final Faculty meeting of the spring semester. Committee members may not apply to the TMSF, but may apply to the Reserve Fund (see A, 3).
    2. Amount of the Fund: The TMSF will be not less than ten (10) percent of the Community Activity Fund. Each spring, the Committee will make a recommendation to the Treasurer as to the size of the TMSF.
    3. The Reserve Fund: The Reserve Fund will be an amount equal to twenty (20) percent of the TMSF, to be drawn from the Town Meeting Fund. The Reserve Fund shall be managed by the Selectboard. This fund is set aside for urgent, unforeseen (and unforeseeable), and time sensitive needs that arise between TMSF application deadlines. It may also be used for emergency needs that do not serve the purpose of the TMSF as defined below (see B). Members of the Committee may also apply to the Reserve Fund. Any funds left in the Reserve Fund at the end of one semester will be included in the TMSF for the next semester. (There have been changes to this language that are pending official language, but amount to the reserve fund being dissolved, and the funds added back into TMSF, which will receive more funds request, as the general fund is no longer able to be used for personal requests.)
    4. Financial Reporting: The Committee will make a detailed financial report to the Selectboard once each semester and to the Town Meeting once each year. The Committee will also make a report available to the Selectboard within 48 hours of a request by the Selectboard to do so, or to the community at large within 48 hours of having been presented with a petition to do with the signatures of three community members.
    5. Effect on Financial Aid: With the exception of the replacement of Federal Work Study Funds by Town Meeting Scholarship Funds, Town Meeting Scholarship Funds are to be considered over and above any Financial Aid Committee grants. Town Meeting Scholarship Funds are not to be considered by the Financial Aid Office in its appropriations.
    6. Misappropriation and Misuse of Awards: Applicants who receive TMSF money may only use that money for the purpose stated in their application. Any money not needed for that purpose must be returned to the TMSF as soon as it is clear that such money will not be needed. Failure to return unused TMSF money, or misuse of TMSF money, is considered a major violation of Community Conduct and will lead to the initiation of a
      Community Conduct process.
  2. Mission and Purpose: The TMSF exists to serve the College’s Mission. The Committee will grant funds based on the principles of the College Mission. It may also give consideration based on class standing, contribution of the applicant to the College community, and demonstrated financial need.
  3. Applications and Privacy: The Committee will accept applications for the Scholarship Fund at regular, publicized intervals. If unforeseen and time sensitive needs arise between deadlines, students may apply to the Selectboard for money from the Reserve Fund.
  4. Privacy and Public Good: In general, the Committee will publish the names of all recipients, the amounts each received, and the nature of the requests. However, applicants may request that their application remain private. The Committee will consult with the Dean of Students on such requests, and will ordinarily respect these requests. If the Committee decides that it cannot grant a request to keep an application private, it will give the applicant an opportunity to withdraw their application.
  5. Appeals and Disputes: No disbursements should be made until at least 48 hours after decisions have been announced. Applicants may request an appeal within 48 hours of announced decisions. If an appeal is requested, disbursements should not be made until after any appeals have been resolved. To request an appeal, an applicant should contact the Public Advocate or the Associate Advocate (if the Public Advocate has a real or perceived conflict of interest). The Advocate will speak with both the Committee and the Applicant to see if a satisfactory resolution can be reached. The two parties may commit to binding arbitration, by a mutually agreeable party. Except in the case that binding arbitration has commenced, the applicant may request that the Selectboard hear their appeal at any time. The Selectboard must hear all appeals that are requested. The Board will consult with the Committee, the applicant, and the Advocate. If the Selectboard affirms the Committee’s decision, it should explain its reasoning, in writing, to the applicant. If the Selectboard find that the Committee made an error, it may use money from the Reserve Fund to resolve the issue.
  6. Reconsideration, Amendment, or Repeal of Article X: Article X may be reconsidered, amended, or repealed by the Town Meeting at any time. However, Article X must be reconsidered, amended, or repealed at any time when the College’s Mission Statement is modified.

Article XI: Town Meeting Committees

  1. Town Meeting will have three representatives to the Board of Trustees: the Head Selectperson, and two student representatives, elected in May for a one year term.
  2. Town Meeting will have at least two student representatives on each policy shaping committee of the faculty, elected in May for a one year term. These representatives are full members of the Committee with voting privileges. The responsibilities of the Town Meeting Representatives include:
    1. Attending regular Committee meetings
    2. Advertising open meeting times
    3. Informing the community on Committee matters by reporting in Town Meeting, ensuring the distribution of open meeting minutes, and any other appropriate means
    4. Gathering and reporting community feedback on topics relevant to the Committee
  3. Task forces may be appointed by the Selectpersons or by Town Meeting for any purpose not normally covered by a Committee. They shall be short term, lasting no longer than one academic year.
  4. Town Meeting Project Committees (“Project Committees”) include the following Committees: Community Service, Environmental Quality, Events, Food, and Public Art.
    1. Project Committees are budgeted from the Community Activities Fund.
    2. Project Committees are composed of three elected members: a Chair, a Assistant Chair, and a Clerk.
      1. The term for elected positions is one year, from the Fall through the Spring semester. Should an elected member resign, the Selectpersons will solicit interested applicants and appoint a replacement. Should the Selectpersons be unable to make a fair decision, a special election will be held. Town Meeting will have veto powers, by two-thirds majority, over any appointment by the Selectpersons.
      2. Town Meeting members wishing to be elected to Project Committees must be nominated in Town Meeting and then elected following the pattern of the Australian ballot. Elections for Project Committees shall be held by the end of the Spring term for the following academic year.
    3. Selectboard shall appoint one of its Selectpeople to serve as a liaison to the Project Committees.
    4. Any community member may sign up for involvement in a Project Committee but are not elected.
      1. Members who sign up are on the committee roster and have voting privileges for decisions.
    5. Elected members of Project Committees shall attend Committee Summits. There will be three Summits in the academic year: in September, January, and April. Selectboard will organize and coordinate the Committee Summits. The Summits shall be organized in the following manner:
      1. At the September Summit, Project Committees will determine their project(s);
      2. At the January Summit, Project Committees will report on the status of their project(s);
      3. At the April Summit, Project Committees will review the outcome of their project(s) in addition to offering recommendations to the next elected body.
    6. All Project Committees shall participate in a Committee Fair the week following the Committee Summit. At the Committee Fair, each committee will:
      1. Present their project(s) for the semester;
      2. Allow interested community members to sign up.
    7. All Project Committees will update the community on the status of their projects at every Town Meeting.
    8. Project Committees shall keep regular meeting times. These meeting times will be announced to the community and inputted into the community calendar.
    9. Project Committees shall publish and distribute the following on Nook forums:
      1. Minutes from their regular meetings;
      2. Monthly updates on their project.
    10. Each committee will be responsible for a bulletin board in the Dining Hall. The bulletin board must contain the following information:
      1. Committee roster;
      2. Semester project;
      3. Meeting times;
      4. Group email address.
  5. Events Committee shall:
    1. Be responsible for organizing and providing for cultural events such as lectures, readings, concerts, and performances open to the community without charge.Be responsible for Apple Days in the Fall semester and Mayfest and the Senior Send-Off Party in the Spring semester. No one of these events shall absorb more than fifty percent (50%) of the funds for the semester without receiving consent from the Selectboard.
      1. Be responsible for all arrangements for events listed in Section ii, including choosing time and place, setting up and cleaning up, advance advertising (including recording events on the Community Calendar in Mather), and providing supplies (extra help— either volunteer or paid with Events Committee Funds—may be recruited, if need be). Be aware of, and abide by, the Alcohol Policy, i.e., by providing only non alcoholic beverages and food when refreshments are supplied.
  6. Environmental Quality Committee
    1. The Committee on Environmental Quality will create, enact, and sustain programs that reduce campus resource consumption and improve campus environmental quality. An additional duty will be to inform and educate.
  7. Community Service Committee
    1. Community Service Committee will be charged with developing and maintaining community service opportunities for the Marlboro College community. The committee will focus its work in the surrounding communities, and yet will not be limited to the immediate geographic area.
  8. Health and Wellness Committee
    1. The Committee shall advise on health care policy and order of operations of the Total Health Center, initiate legislation as necessary, address health related student issues and develop educational programs, discussions and events to meet the needs of the current campus population.
    2. The committee shall advise and work with the Total Health Center, including conducting periodic review of the Health Services and working to improve or revise these services as necessary. The Director of the Total Health Center shall appoint a representative to the committee to facilitate this communication.
    3. The committee shall have four members, two elected at the start of the Fall semester and two elected at the start of the Spring semester for terms of one year. There shall always be at least two students on the committee.
  9. Public Art Committee
    1. The Public Art Committee shall be responsible for the development, advancement, and encouragement of Marlboro community art in appropriate public spaces on the Marlboro Campus.
  10. Gym Monitor:
    1. The athletic equipment kept in the gym will be managed and maintained by a community member appointed to the position of gym monitor. The Gym Monitor shall manage the stereo cord so that it is available only when the THC is closed; post and uphold Gym rules; keep weights orderly and accounted for; advise people on the correct use of the equipment; ensure availability of sanitizing spray bottle; wash gym towels; and be available for consultation on matters of personal training, form, and routine. Selection The Gym Monitor shall be appointed by the THC staff by the end of Spring Semester. The position is for a full school year. The Monitor may be removed by a majority vote in a ballot held after a recall petition to the selectpersons signed by ¼ of the college community. THe salary of the Gym Monitor will be paid from Town Meeting funds at a rate set at VT minimum wage, for up to 10 hrs/wk.
  11. Community Newspaper:
    1. The Citizen is a vehicle for the communication of news, opinions, letters, reviews, and related information among members of the Marlboro College Community. As such, it represents no official position either of the College or of Town Meetings. Its pages and production process are open to any member of the College Community who wishes to participate, within the bounds of practicality and at the editor’s judgment. The Community encourages conscientious and constructive participation, but grants broad latitude to contributors in the spirit of experimentation, humor, and open debate.
      1. Production Policies:
        1. The editor and staff are responsible for soliciting and selecting or producing material for the paper. Editorial oversight in the interests of well written, thoughtful journalism is appropriate, but contributors should be allowed to accept or reject any substantial changes in their work, and the publication of letters in particular should be judged in a context of encouraging debate;
        2. All contributions (except straightforward announcements of events) must ordinarily be signed. The editor may choose to run a piece without a by line for a stated reason accompanying the piece;
        3. The paper appears on a regular basis, every two weeks at least, whenever possible, and is available to all members of the Community.
      2. Newspaper Staff: The formal description of positions is not intended to restrict the working organization of the paper. The Editor and staff are free to divide, share, or exchange specific production responsibilities, or to establish collective processes, in short, to experiment with various ways of putting out a paper.
        1. The Editor: The Editor is elected following the last Town Meeting of the spring semester following the format of Australian Ballot for a one year term, beginning the following fall, or whenever the position is unfilled, to complete a term. Each candidate shall post a descriptive statement of interest within twenty four hours of nomination. The editor may be removed by a majority vote in a ballot held after a recall petition to the Selectpersons signed by one quarter of the College Community; If the Editor is eligible for a Work Study position, the position will be paid instead from Town Meeting funds at a rate not to exceed the amount of a Work Study grant per year; The Editor is responsible for organizing and maintaining the staff from among interested and qualified vo lunteers and in consultation with the Work Study Coordinator. The editor is the Work Study supervisor for any Work Study staff members.The editor is required to meet with Selectboard on a monthly basis to ensure successful completion of the position’s requirements. It is a responsibility of the position to arrange that meeting.
        2. Additional Staff: Those interested in working on the paper, whether on a regular or an occasional basis, meet with the Editor to establish staff responsibilities and positions. The College typically supports the paper by making available the equivalent of at least two Work Study staff positions.
      3. Ethics and Rights:
        1. The Citizen shall, at the beginning of each semester, produce a code of ethics. This code of ethics must be published in the first edition of the semester and held to by the Citizen staff.
  12. Literary Magazine:
    1. Literary Magazine: At least once a year, the Literary Magazine will publish works of literature and art by members of the Marlboro College community. An individual’s publication in a given issue will be at the discretion of the editorial staff. The staff will consist of three main positions a general editor, a business editor, and a layout editor ú for which any member of the College community will be eligible. The general editor will be elected annually from nominations taken at the first Town Meeting of the year. This editor’s job will involve scheduling, organizing, and overseeing the entire project. The general editor will appoint the other two editors for business and layout. The business editor’s job will involve keeping the budget and contacting people. The layout editor’s job will involve directing the actual construction of the magazine. The editors will maintain these responsibilities unless/until cause arises to transfer certain jobs due to an unfair balance of work. However, basic participation on the literary magazine staff, not including work for the said editorial positions, is open to any interested person; this form of participation is not dependent on nomination or appointment.
  13. Food Committee:
    1. The Food Committee will discuss campus food offerings with the dining service, maintain a system for soliciting feedback concerning dining service, and communicate feedback with the kitchen staff. The committee will also work with the Compost Coordinator, the Farm Committee, the Environmental Quality Committee, and the Real Food Challenge to advance their common interests. The committee consists of five community members. A member of the dining service will be invited to be a member of the committee.

Article XII: Housing Committee

  1. The Housing Committee will consist of the Director of Housing and Residential Life, ex officio; A Resident Assistant, ex officio; four students; one staff or faculty member. The committee will assist the Director of Housing and Residential Life in housing policy and administration, to an extent decided by the Director and the committee, and perform duties as specified in article VIII: Rooming Policy.
  2. Elections for the Housing Committee shall take place at the start of the Fall semester (two students) and start of the Spring semester (two students and one staff or faculty member). Terms are one year.

Article XIII: Admissions Committee

  1. Town Meeting members will elect student representatives to the Admissions Committee. The number of student representatives will equal the number of faculty members on the Committee. The Australian ballot and checklist pattern will be followed. Students shall be elected by the Town Meeting for a term of one year. The yearly election will held following the last Town Meeting of the spring semester.
  2. Students who accept their nomination should write a brief statement explaining why they wish to be on the Admissions Committee. This statement will be posted during elections, to be referred to by those voting to help them make a decision.
  3. All Town Meeting representatives to the Admissions Committee must give a two week notice in the event of their wishing to leave the Committee. The Selectpeople will appoint a replacement.

Article XIV: Farm Committee

  1. The Farm Committee will consist of six Town Meeting Members, which includes preferably one student, faculty, and staff member. Three members will be elected at the start of each semester. Terms will be for one year. The Farm Committee will guide, plan, and organize the pursuit of small scale agriculture at Marlboro. They will be responsible for providing leadership and knowledge to the wider community, for coordinating both the physical farm work and the extensive long term planning necessary to create and maintain a sustainable farm. To these ends, the committee will appoint a Farm Manager and Apprentice Farm Manager at the beginning of each Spring semester to coincide with a new growing cycle. Each year, barring exceptional circumstances such as incapacity or incompetence, the Apprentice will be appointed to the position of Farm Manager and a new Apprentice will be selected.
    1. The Farm Manager is appointed by and serves at the discretion of the Farm Committee. The position is limited to faculty, staff, and currently enrolled students(excluding graduating seniors, who would be unavailable in the fall)preferably living on campus. The position would be ideal for students wishing to incorporate the study of farming into their Plan. The responsibilities of the Farm Manager may include but are not limited to: Providing leadership to the farm community at Marlboro College; planning, in collaboration with the Farm Committee, the long term goals of the farm and greenhouse both physically and ideologically; providing a detailed budget in collaboration with the Farm Committee each semester; defining and delegating tasks necessary to the smooth function of the farm; generating and maintaining a detailed map of the farm site; procuring and maintaining necessary tools, equipment, and supplies; organizing the labor of interested community members into Work Crews; organizing the regular harvest of crops and transporting them to the Dining Hall or Campus Center; informing the community of the state of the farm and greenhouse at each Town Meeting; using Farm Committee or other funds to invite and encourage guest speakers; working with the Environmental Quality Assistant to maintain and integrate the compost system into the farm and greenhouse; compiling a running manual of farming techniques and resources; educating interested community members in the use of tools and the knowledge necessary to run the farm; and educating and preparing the Apprentice Farm Manager to take on the role of Farm Manager. The Farm Manager is strongly encouraged to work on the farm during school vacations and r.is required to maintain the farm during the summer, provided that the college can provide hourly compensation and either nearby housing or a housing stipend. If the Farm Manager declines these tasks, the Farm Committee will advertise the position and select the most qualified applicant(s).
    2. In compensation for their responsibilities and work during the spring and fall semester, the Farm Manager will receive a one year salary equivalent to one work study position.
    3. The Apprentice Farm Manager is appointed by and serves at the discretion of the Farm Committee. The Apprentice will assist and learn from the Farm Manager with the expectation that they will take on the full responsibilities of the Farm Manager position the following year. The Apprentice is strongly encouraged to work on the farm during school vacations and during the summer, again contingent on hourly compensation and either housing provisions or a housing stipend provided by the college. If the Apprentice declines these tasks, the Farm Committee will advertise the position and select the most qualified applicant(s).

Article XIX: Sound Equipment

  1. Two people shall be appointed by the Select People as Sound System Curators. Their term shall be one year and they will be paid $150 per semester. The requirements of this position are that each coordinator have a car or some means of transporting the equipment to the requested location. Coordinators shall also have a means by which they are contactable and must publicize that means to the community at the very start of their term. Their duties shall be:
    1. Maintain the equipment; keep supplies of expendable equipment stocked, inventory the equipment once a month and report to the Select People on the use and condition of the sound equipment. If a malfunction with the equipment is detected, report to selectboard immediately.
    2. Make recommendations to the Select People for the purchase of new equipment;
    3. Hold the key to the closet where the equipment is stored
    4. Assure that all equipment is returned to a proper storage location within twelve (12) hours of the cessation of its use.
    5. On Friday evening and Saturday evening the coordinators must be available for contact from 7-10pm. This means that they must have a phone or some means of being contacted on their person during this time.
    6. The coordinators must be aware of the last known location of the sound system. During the 12 hours that the system is checked out for, the curators shall not be held responsible for the well being of the equipment.
    7. The curators must be available to report the last known location of the sound system.
    8. In order to ensure that the curators know who is responsible for the equipment during the 12 hours that they are checked out, the curator must obtain a signature from the person checking out the equipment upon arrival to the requested location. The log will be accessible to selectboard and the curators.
    9. Both curators are required to meet with Selectboard on a monthly basis to ensure successful completion of the position’s requirements. It is a responsibility of that position to arrange that meeting.
  2. Failure to complete these duties will result in the withholding of pay and removal from the position.
  3. A key to the closet where the equipment is stored will also be held by the Head Select Person and the Chairperson of Events Committee.
  4. The Selectboard treasurer shall keep an updated inventory of the Town Meeting sound equipment.
  5. The budget for the maintenance and expansion of the Town Meeting sound system will be set by the Selectpeople.
  6. Borrowers of the sound equipment shall be responsible for the replacement of lost items and damage to the equipment.
  7. Each curator is required to train the newly appointed curator at the beginning of their term. The training should include how to set up the system so that its ready for use once it is delivered to the location.

Article XV: Identity Resource Centers

  1. Living In Color (LIC) is a student-run minority resource group for people of color (POC). It is comprised of 2-3 main coordinators elected by town meeting annually, with at least one being elected is in January and at least one being elected in September, and LIC strongly encourages those leadership positions to be held by POC. However, organizational responsibilities will not be limited to LIC coordinators. All members of the Marlboro community will have many opportunities to contribute. The group will have a faculty advisor who will be appointed by the coordinators as needed. LIC has two main, independent goals:
    1. Community education: Holding events/discussions at least once a month; Bringing noteworthy speakers to give talks on campus. Educational LIC events typically cover a range of themes including race, class, culture, LGBTQA issues and anything else pertaining to the identities of POC at Marlboro College.
    2. Providing safe spaces for POC to share their experiences: Social events for POC may be held on or off campus Above all else, LIC strives to create spaces where people can dissect challenging topics in a mindful and respectful manner.
  2. The Marlboro College Women’s Resource Center aims to recognize oppressive power structures and work against them through intentional dialogue. The WRC provides an accountable space in which individuals present strive not to reproduce oppressions. The WRC also provides a dedicated space for female socialized and/or identified students, staff and faculty of Marlboro College. The WRC aims to empower all community members to reconstruct a sense of community and equality, be an institutional advocate for women, trans people, and women’s issues, and trans issues and be an educational leader on issues of gender, sexism and oppression. The WRC celebrates the exploration of people’s differences and encourages all community members to engage in dialogue with the Center. The Women’s Resource Center’s advisory board will consist of six town meeting members, preferably two staff members, two students, and two faculty members. Members will be elected through Town Meeting and serve one year terms three starting in the fall and three starting in the spring. These town meeting members should serve as community educators and organizers on issues of gender, sexism, and oppression. They will also manage the WRC space.
  3. The Marlboro College Queer Resource Center will endeavor to provide a safe and inclusive space for queer identified individuals within the community. It will also provide educational resources to queer community members, and all community members who wish to learn more about queer culture and identity. The QRC will act as an advocate for those who are questioning, or find themselves in a state of conflict over their gender identity, sexual or romantic orientation. It will advise related policy made through Town Meeting, and have a role in ensuring safety and accessibility in the wider community for all those who identify as queer.
    1. Membership to the QRC will not be determined by election. Rather, all those who wish to be on the QRC shall notify the Moderators. This ensures privacy of queer-identified individuals who may not wish to be ‘out,’ but are in need of a secure and supportive space.
    2. Two QRC Moderators will be elected at the beginning of each fall semester and serve a term of one year. The Moderators are responsible for setting regular meeting times, and calling ad hoc meetings as needed. The Moderators will hold the key to the QRC space.
      1. The Moderators, at the start of each semester, will help the QRC to set guidelines to establish a safe and inclusive space. They will publish these guidelines both in the space itself, and online.
      2. The Moderators will be responsible for maintaining the safety and health of the QRC.
      3. The Moderators may be impeached by petition to the Selectboard. Selectboard will come to a determination with ample voice from the community. If impeachment occurs, Selectboard will hold elections to replace the Moderator(s) immediately.
  4. The Spiritual Life Center shall help to address and facilitate the spiritual and religious needs of students, faculty and staff by providing a Space on campus for the general practice of religious and spiritual activities. The Spiritual Life Committee does not promote the views of any one religion or spiritual tradition; instead, our objective is to allow a space for religious and spiritual life in a secular institution.
    1. The Spiritual Life Center’s advisory board will consist of six town meeting members, two staff members, two students, and two faculty members. Members will be elected through Town Meeting and serve one year terms three starting in the fall and three starting in the spring These members shall be responsible for encouraging discussion about spiritual life, organizing programming, as well as providing links to the greater religious and spiritual community in a manner demanded by the student body.They will also manage the Spiritual Life Center space.

Article XVI: Representatives of Business, Government, Education, and Social Action Groups

  1. The Marlboro College campus shall be open to all representatives from business, government, education, and social action groups, provided that there is a demonstrated community demand.
  2. In the event that the College is contacted by such a representative, a notice to that effect will be posted for one week. If one or more students indicate interest, the representative will be invited and hospitably received.
  3. The school will initiate contacts with representatives from any group or organization if students show interest in talking with a representative.

Article XVII: Smoking Ban

  1. In accordance with state statutes, the possession of lighted tobacco products in any form and use of tobacco substitutes (e-cigarettes and other vaping devices) is prohibited in all indoor places with public access and in all indoor workplaces. These include, but are not limited to, the Graduate Center, Marlboro College Technology Center, the Rice Aron Library, the Campus Center, the Dining Hall, Whittemore Theater, Ragle Hall and Serkin, Persons Auditorium, all buildings where classes are held, and all buildings with administrative offices.
  2. Smoking shall be permitted outdoors, provided that it is not within 25 feet of any campus building and in any space specifically designated as a “Smoking Permitted Area.” This shall be defined as any space with an independent ventilation system where College employees and non smokers are not required to visit on a regular basis. Smoking will not be permitted in Whittemore House, Red House, or cabins and cottages unless all residents agree to permit it.
  3. Violators of these prohibitions who fail to comply upon request may be referred to the Community Conduct process.

Article XVIII: Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy

Note: The following policy was approved in Town Meeting 12/06/2017, and approved by of the Board of Trustees in 06/17/2018.

  1. Preamble: Marlboro College cultivates self-discovery and community awareness through rigorous conversations and energetic debates We recognize that more significant learning takes place when students are given the opportunity to explore, to experiment, to take risks and to change one’s opinion after self-reflection. At the same time, we believe that students benefit from a culture that provides realistic consequences for poor decision-making. Therefore, the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy strives to balance autonomy with accountability. We assume that all students want to enhance their intellectual and social capabilities. We believe that abuse and dependence on alcohol and other drugs restricts those capabilities. The goal of this policy is to provide public health education and support to students who choose to use alcohol or other drugs, and intervention and consequences, where appropriate, for students who abuse that privilege.

    The Office of the Dean of Students is charged with ensuring that the community receives necessary education and support to help both prevent and address consequences of alcohol and other drug abuse. The Community Conduct process is intended to ensure that the community abides by the Alcohol and Other Drugs policy. The Dean of Students in conjunction with the Dean’s Advisory Committee will review this policy biennially.

    Abuse of alcohol and other drugs, either illicit or prescribed threatens individual health, compromises educational development, and undermines community integrity. For detailed information on the short and long term effects of alcohol and other drugs, contact the Total Health Center.
  2. Alcohol
    1. Relevant Vermont State Law
      1. Persons under 21 years of age may not possess or consume alcohol, nor may they falsely represent their age in order to procure alcohol. (7 V.S.A., § 656).
      2. No person may knowingly create a direct and immediate opportunity for a person under 21 years of age to consume alcohol. (7 V.S.A., § 658).
      3. Individuals are liable under the law if they furnish alcohol to another individual either apparently under the influence of alcohol (defined as, ―a state of intoxication accompanied by a perceptible act or series of actions which present signs of intoxication‖) or reasonably likely to be under the influence of alcohol as a result of the amount of alcohol served to that person. This person furnishing the alcohol is liable whether they have caused intoxication in whole or in part (7 V.S.A., § 501).
      4. Operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or other substance with a BAC of 0.08; enhanced penalty for BAC of 0.16 or more (23 V.S.A., § 1201).
    2. College Regulations
      1. As required by federal statute and in order to maintain federal funding, Marlboro College prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol by students and employees on or in all college-owned properties, or as a part of any of its sponsored activities. In particular individuals under the age of 21 are prohibited from possessing or using alcohol and no Marlboro College community member may distribute alcohol to other community members except in a manner consistent with State Law.
      2. Individuals seeking to host a party or social gathering at which alcoholic beverages will be consumed and 12 or more community members will attend are required to register the event with Residence Life in writing at least 48 hours in advance of the event. Requests received inside the 48-hour requirement may be considered at the discretion of Residence Life.
      3. Sponsors of events or social gatherings at which alcohol will be consumed must provide the following: date of event, location, specific hours of event, approximate numbers expected, the type(s) of alcohol, non-alcoholic beverages, and food options that may be available to participants, the name(s) and contact information for the sponsor(s) of event, as well as the names of 2-4 event monitors who are responsible for assisting the sponsor(s) with overseeing that the event.
      4. All sponsors and monitors may be held responsible for the behavior of those attending the event. Sponsors and monitors are strongly encouraged to abstain from or significantly limit their consumption of alcoholic beverages and to contact on-call Student Life staff in a timely manner should they become concerned that a party or social gathering is becoming unmanageable. On-call Student Life staff in conjunction with community members will act to ensure the success and safety of the event or social gathering.
      5. Sponsors of parties or social events at which alcoholic beverages will be consumed are responsible for taking reasonable precautions to prevent excessive drinking.
      6. Smaller gatherings (less than 12) may be held, but such gatherings must not adversely affect other residents or the surrounding environment. Small gatherings of this sort do not need to be registered, unless they are likely to draw attention due to noise or other circumstances. Such gatherings, however, are subject to all regulations regarding alcohol use described in this policy.
      7. No social gatherings can exceed the legal capacity of the room or facility in which they are held.
      8. Sponsors of any college social event at which alcoholic beverages will be consumed will provide similar amounts of popular non-alcoholic beverages and substantial high-protein food options.
      9. The college prohibits any coercion or group pressure to consume alcoholic beverages. This includes all drinking games such as beer pong, quarters, flip cup, etc.
      10. Possession and use of kegs or common containers (e.g. punch bowls) is not allowed.
      11. Alcohol-related behavior that causes or can reasonably be expected to cause physical harm to persons or damage to property or is unreasonably disruptive to the campus community or its neighbors will be considered a violation of this policy.
      12. The college encourages persons concerned about their use of intoxicants to seek advice or assistance through the Resident Assistants, the Student Life Coordinators, the Total Health Center Staff or the Office of Dean of Students. Furthermore, the college encourages persons concerned about the substance use or abuse of another to communicate with that person urging her or him to seek advice or assistance through college support offices. Counseling and medical resources are available on a confidential basis.
      13. Community members seeking help for themselves or others and reaching out to college staff or faculty will not suffer judicial consequence if in violation of the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy.
      14. The college will provide assessments, education and information regarding alcohol and other drug related issues and will publish and distribute information about local alcohol counseling and guidance resources. The college will arrange transportation for individuals seeking support outside the college area.
  3. Other Illegal Drug Use
    1. Vermont State Law
      1. Marlboro College in keeping with Vermont State laws pertaining to the possession and distribution of illicit drugs, prohibit the use, sale, or possession of regulated substances without a prescription. In the event that a member of the community becomes subject to legal action for the violation of these laws, the college will review the individual’s status and will take appropriate disciplinary action. See 18 V.S.A., § 4230-4238, 4250, 4252.
    2. College Regulations
      1. Marlboro College prohibits the use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of non-prescribed narcotics, amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, hallucinogens, or cannabis, as well as other synthetic drugs. The college also strongly views abuse of the above substances a threat to the health, safety, and welfare of the individual, the college community, and the educational mission of the college.
      2. Marlboro College prohibits the possession of all date rape drugs and club drugs commonly used to commit drug-facilitated sexual assault. These drugs include, but are not limited to Rohypnol, GHB (gamma hydroxybutyric acid), and Ketamine.
      3. Abuse of alcohol and other drugs, either illicit or prescribed, threatens individual health, compromises educational development, and undermines community integrity. For information on the health effects of alcohol and other drugs, contact the THC.
    3. Individual and Community Guidelines
      1. The college encourages individuals needing help as a result of their use of alcohol and other drugs, to contact a Resident Assistant, a Student Life Coordinator, a member of the Total Health Center staff (Health and Psychological Counseling offices), or the office of Dean of Students. Further, the college encourages persons concerned about the abuse of alcohol and other drugs by another to communicate with the other, urging him or her to seek advice and/or assistance through appropriate college support offices. Counseling and medical resources are available on a confidential basis.
      2. The college supports all efforts to provide education in the area of alcohol and other drug abuse and supports individuals seeking help with drug related problems. Information on local drug counseling and assistance programs is available through the Health Center, and the college will arrange transportation when necessary for individuals seeking help outside the college.
      3. To ensure that students receive prompt and appropriate medical attention for alcohol and other drug poisoning and to reduce impediments to seeking such assistance, the college has implemented a Good Samaritan Policy. In instances in which students request medical assistance either for themselves or others due to an overdose of alcohol or other drugs, neither will be subject to formal disciplinary action. In lieu of formal disciplinary action the involved students will meet with the Dean of Students and may be referred to Health Services for further assessment. This policy does not protect students who flagrantly or repeatedly violate this policy and does not preclude disciplinary action regarding other violations of the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy.
  4. College Action and Sanctions

    Students who violate the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy may be subject to sanction. Sanctions will be determined through the Community Conduct process following the procedures outlined in the Constitution. The appeal process is described in Section V.E. of the Constitution.

    Several factors will be considered in determining sanctions: the prior history of the student(s) involved in the incident; the severity of the incident and its impact on individuals and the college community; the demeanor of the student(s) during the process; the student(s) acceptance of responsibility through the process; and other mitigating factors. Failure to comply with sanctions will result in further college action which can include suspension or expulsion.

    The expectation is that student(s) will learn from prior incidents, and prior violations will be taken into account in the sanctioning process. Subsequent violations are therefore likely to result in more significant sanctions. However, prior violations will not be used to determine responsibility for behavior in any particular situation currently under consideration.

    Specific violations of the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy include, but are not limited to, the following:
    1. Underage possession/underage consumption of alcohol.
    2. Providing alcoholic beverages to underage persons.
    3. Failure to register a party or social gathering at which alcoholic beverages will be consumed.
    4. Hosting or participating in any activity that promotes excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages.
    5. Public intoxication.
    6. Excessive use of alcohol which endangers oneself or other members of the community.
    7. Dangerous, disorderly or disruptive conduct.
    8. Conduct that results in damage to or destruction of personal or college property.
    9. Driving while intoxicated.
    10. Misrepresenting one’s age or using altered identification in order to obtain alcohol.
    11. Administration of an intoxicant, without the consent of another, with the intent to impair the other’s ability to control their behavior or to make informed decisions.
    12. Sale/distribution of illegal drugs.
    13. Possession/use of illegal drugs.
    14. Use of a prescription drug if the prescription was not issued to the student, or the distribution or sale of a prescription drug to a person to whom the prescription was not originally issued.
    15. Possession or use of date rape drugs such as Rohypnol, GHB, and Ketamine.
    16. Alcohol/other drug use resulting in medical treatment.

The following sanctions, or any combination thereof, may be applied to any individual student or group of students for violations of the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy:

  1. Educational – examples include community service, educational projects, presentations, or workshops related to the violation and designed to assist students in better understanding the impact of their behavior on self and others.
  2. Counseling Assesment/Evaluation – commonly recommended to assist the student in better understanding the personal decisions or emotional issues that contributed to their behavior.
  3. Restitution/Fines – involves the replacement of property or payment for the replacement or repair of property damaged as well as fines assessed.
  4. Housing Ban – involves restricting a student from a particular residence hall or all residence halls with the exception of the one in which the student resides.
  5. Housing Relocation – if space is available, a student may be moved to a different room or residence hall.
  6. Housing Probation – means that another violation may result in expulsion from college housing.
  7. Revocation of Housing Privileges – means that the student is removed and banned from college housing.
  8. Social Probation – means that another violation may result in the student being allowed on campus only for academic reasons (e.g. classes, library, meeting with faculty).
  9. Social Restriction – means the student in banned from campus with the exception of classes, library work, or meetings with advisor/faculty.
  10. Suspension – this action results in the involuntary withdrawal of the student from the college, its programs, and facilities for a specified period of time (e.g. semester, academic year).
  11. Expulsion – this action results in the permanent separation of the student from the college, its programs, and facilities.

Article XX: Clean Up After Social Events

  1. All campus social events must be cleaned up within twelve hours of the end of the event.
  2. Events in the Dining Hall shall be cleaned up before the next meal.
  3. All campus social events must be cleaned up immediately after the event if the room(s) used during the event is/are scheduled to be used by others before the twelve hour time limit outlined in part A. It is the responsibility of the person(s) sponsoring the event to know if and when the room(s) is/are scheduled to be used next.

Article XXI: Town Meeting Guidelines

At the first Town Meeting the moderator will explain, quickly and concisely, the order and rules relating to how Town Meeting is run. The steps on how a vote is taken, how to ask questions, and how to state opinions for or against a proposal or amendment will be clarified during the first fall town meeting.

  1. The Town Meeting shall be conducted by Robert’s Rules of Order, as interpreted by the moderator. The moderator may appoint a parliamentarian to advise on questions of process during the meeting.
  2. Business may be submitted for a Town Meeting agenda with at least 48 hour notice to a member of the Selectboard, or to the Treasurer in the case of requests for funds. Items may be added with less than 48 hour notice with the approval of the Selectboard.
  3. In advance of a meeting, the Selectboard may fix the time at which to adjourn. This shall be included on the agenda.

Article XXII: Student Activities Fee and Requests for Funds

  1. Any student taking course(s) for credit at Marlboro College (with the exception of those students in absentia) shall be charged the full activities fee. Anyone wishing to contest this may apply to the Selectboard for a waiver. Waiver applications must be submitted by semester. Graduates of Marlboro College taking courses for credit will be granted a fifty percent (50%) reduction in the Student Activity Fee.
  2. The Selectboard must be informed of any request of $200 or more at least 24 hours prior to Town Meeting. Before making the request before Town Meeting, the person making the request must know the amount of money in the relevant fund, and must have sought other sources of funding, as well, when appropriate; Any request of over $1,000 must be made and posted at one Town Meeting to be acted upon during the subsequent meeting. The person making the request must be aware of the amount of money in the relevant fund, and must have sought other sources of funding when appropriate. If the request is for activities that affect Marlboro College forested land, the applicant must have consulted with the Environmental Advisory Committee. Exceptions to these stipulations can be made by vote of 2/3 present at Town Meeting.
  3. Each Town Meeting agenda will list all requests for money.

Article XXIII: Student Interest Group Funds

  1. Definitions and Responsibilities Governance: Selectboard will manage the Student Interest Group Fund (SIG Fund).
    1. Amount of the Fund: Each spring, the Treasurer shall propose a budget for the SIG Fund for the following fiscal year. Selectboard will bring the SIG Budget to Town Meeting for approval as a part of the yearly Town Meeting budget.
    2. Misappropriation and Misuse of Awards: Applicants who receive SIG Funds may only use that money for the purpose stated in their application. Failure to return unused SIG funds, or misuse of SIG funds, is considered a major violation of Community Conduct and will lead to the initiation of a Community Conduct process.
  2. Mission and Purpose: The SIG Fund exists to support student-organized programming and ongoing initiatives.
  3. Applications: Selectboard will accept applications for the SIG on a rolling basis. Applications shall detail:
    1. the name of the group;
    2. the total amount of funding requested, with a detailed budget breakdown;
    3. the group’s intended purpose;
    4. expressed interest in the SIG; and
    5. how the interest group will give back to the Marlboro College community.
  4. Privacy and Public Good: In general, Selectboard will publish the names of all recipients, the amounts each received, and the nature of the requests.
  5. Appeals and Disputes: No disbursements should be made until at least 48 hours after decisions have been announced. Applicants may request an appeal within 48 hours of announced decisions. If an appeal is requested, disbursements should not be made until after any appeals have been resolved. To request an appeal, an applicant should contact the Public Advocate or the Associate Advocate (if the Public Advocate has a real or perceived conflict of interest). The Advocate will speak with both Selectboard and the Applicant to see if a satisfactory resolution can be reached.

Article XXIV: Compost Coordinator

  1. The Selectboard shall appoint a Compost Coordinator, usually a willing staff member with sustainability-related responsibilities. The Compost Coordinator is responsible for the smooth running of the compost systems and for ensuring that all participants are aware of and perform their duties. The Compost Coordinator shall be assisted by at least one Environmental Quality Assistant.
  2. The EQC is responsible for maintaining signs near the compost station in the Dining Hall so that the procedure for adding to the compost bins is clear to all who are dining.
  3. The Dining Hall Crews are responsible for moving the compost buckets from the compost station to the loading dock after brunch, lunch and dinner. The crews are also responsible for wiping down the compost station and maintaining the general cleanliness of the area.
  4. An electronic sign-up sheet for any community member who wishes to contribute to the moving of the compost from the loading dock to the farm shall be maintained by the Compost Coordinator. Members of the Farm Committee and Environmental Quality Committee are expected to sign up regularly. All other community members are encouraged to participate.
  5. The Farm Committee shall maintain the compost heaps at the farm. It shall also maintain clear signs at the heaps describing the procedure for adding the compostable material.

Article XXV: Farm Fund

  1. The Farm Fund will be the Marlboro College Farm’s internal bank account.
  2. All profits earned from the Marlboro College Farm will be deposited into the Farm Fund.
  3. The Farm Fund will be overseen by the Farm Manager and the Farm Committee, with the consultation of the Treasurer. The Farm Manager shall:
    1. record all deposits into the Farm Fund;
    2. record all withdrawals from the Farm Fund;
    3. report to Town Meeting at the end of the Fall Semester on the status of the Farm Fund; and
    4. recommend budget changes to Selectboard and Town Meeting at the beginning of the Spring Semester.
  4. The Farm Manager will be bonded for $1,000.

Article XXVII: Community Calendar

  1. The Community Calendar (“Calendar”) is available to all Community Members to schedule and advertise College Events, on or off-campus.
  2. The Calendar Curator shall maintain an orderly and functional Calendar by:
    1. ensuring Calendar Event cards are stocked, available for use, and kept near the Calendar.
    2. configuring day, week, and month markers, and date/Event cards at the beginning of each semester.
    3. organizing the Calendar regularly and tidying the area around the Calendar.
    4. advertising their presence and role.
    5. supporting community members in scheduling Events.
    6. providing the Town Crier weekly with a list of Events to be announced at mealtimes.
    7. maintaining regular contact with the Events Committee, Committee on Lectures, Concerts, and Exhibits, Office of Residential Life, Selectboard, Academic Affairs, Outdoor Program, and any other Committee, Office, or Department which regularly holds Events.
  3. The Calendar Curator shall ensure that community members are using the Calendar properly by establishing and maintaining a general code of use:
    1. Space on the Calendar may be used exclusively for Event cards and flyers.
    2. Once an Event has been posted, only the Calendar Curator or host(s) of the Event may alter or remove the Event card.
    3. Tampering with, defacing, or removing Event cards is prohibited.
    4. If a Community Member fails to abide by these guidelines, they will be subject to a penalty of one (1) hour of community service.
  4. Elections for Calendar Curator will be held at the beginning of the Spring Semester; the term of the Calendar Curator shall be for one year.

Associate Faculty

Appointments by the Trustees of Associate Faculty for a three-year term shall be made upon recommendation of the President, the Dean of Faculty, and the Committee on Faculty.

Teachers not on Marlboro Faculty

Except for tutorials with non-Marlboro faculty for Plan students all courses taught by non-members of the faculty must be approved by the Curriculum Committee.

  1. Faculty members may arrange for the teaching of credit courses in their field (i.e. courses that they are qualified to evaluate) on an occasional basis (not more than once every two years) by someone not on the faculty, with the following conditions:
  • that they provide, as necessary, for supervision of the classes and of the grading, and that they be responsible for the grades in the course;
  • that they submit for the approval of the Curriculum Committee a course description, a curriculum vitae of the proposed teacher, an explanation of what fees, if any, are to be charged, and how they will be collected, and an explanation of how and to what extent the classes and grading will be supervised;
  • that students understand that they are to pay any expenses incurred.
  1. Marlboro College does not encourage courses taught by non-members of the faculty on a more regular basis. Courses taught by those not on the faculty more often than once every two years are subject to the same requirements as those in “1”, but must, in addition, be approved in advance by the Curriculum Committee. Where the Curriculum Committee determines that it is in the interest of the College to offer on a fee basis courses not otherwise available in the curriculum, the Dean of Faculty may arrange for such courses, with fees to be billed for the instructor through the College. The committee should weigh, in making such determination, possible unfairness to students without extra money and any possible distorting pressures on our curriculum. Before approving such a course when the proposal has not been made by a faculty member, the Dean of Faculty shall assure that a member of the faculty, in the area of the course to be taught, agrees to vouch for the credits and grades in the course, and to assume responsibility for submitting grades on time.

Bachelor’s Degree

Marlboro College offers Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in International Studies degrees.

Graduation Requirements:

  • Meet the Clear Writing Requirement,
  • Complete a 45-60 credit Plan of Concentration,
  • Earn 120 credits with a minimum of C- on Plan of Concentration,
  • Submit a final copy of the Work in appropriate form to the Registrar,
  • Pay all College bills.

Bachelor of Science Degree: A Bachelor of Science (BS) degree may be selected by a student with a broad grounding in the Natural Sciences. To be eligible for a BS degree a student must complete at least two foundational Mathematics courses (usually either two semesters of Calculus or one semester each of Calculus and Statistics), at least one foundational course in four of the five Natural Science fields (Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Physics/Astronomy) and at least two advanced courses in one area of the Natural Sciences or Mathematics.

International Studies: World Studies Program students earn a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in International Studies, awarded by Marlboro College in association with the School for International Training.

Bereavement

In the event of the death of a close family member or loved one, bereavement pay is available to staff members meeting the eligibility requirements and according to the calculations in the “Eligibility and Calculations” subsection above. You may take up to five days of paid bereavement leave each year.

Bomb Threat

Step 1

  • Record all vital information, including:

    • The location of the device.

    • The time, if any, the device is scheduled to go off.

    • The appearance or type of container used for the device.

    • The reason for placing the device.

    • The size of the bomb.

    • The type of explosive used in the device.

    • The name of the caller or organization taking responsibility.

    • Any additional information that might be available.

Step 2

  • If possible, note the following information:
    • Caller’s age
    • Caller’s gender
    • Any background noise heard during call
    • Caller’s mental state
    • Write down the Caller ID number
  •  

Step 3

Call 911.

Step 4

If this occurs during Business Hours, call *611 to alert the Emergency Team. If it’s after hours, weekends or a holiday, page the SLC at 877.730.6051.

If you see a suspicious object or a potential bomb, DO NOT HANDLE THE OBJECT. Clear the area and dial 911 and then either *611 (business hours) or page the SLC at 877.730.6051 (after hours, weekends, or holidays). Inform them that 911 has been called.

If there is an explosion:

  1. Immediately take cover under sturdy furniture
  2. Stay away from the windows
  3. Do not light matches
  4. Move well away from the site of the explosion to a safe location
  5. Use stairs only, do not use elevators

Administrative Response:

  • The Crisis Alert Notification System will be enacted.
  • The building in question will be evacuated to predetermined and posted safe zones. When evacuating the building, only use stairs. Do not use elevators. Move well away from the building and follow the instructions of emergency personnel at the scene.

Breaks

You are encouraged to take short breaks during the course of the workday. Breaks are intended to allow you to refresh, refocus and relax. Breaks may not cumulatively exceed 15 minutes per four hours of work time. Break periods within the 15-minute guideline need not be recorded on the timecard and will be considered time worked and therefore paid. Extended break periods taken by non-exempt employees must be recorded on the timecard as they are not considered working hours and are not paid. The standard workday additionally includes a non-paid 30-minute break for lunch. Please consult your supervisors for break schedules or guidelines specific to your department.

Bridges/Woods Orientation Program

Bridges/Woods provides a transition experience for students just entering the campus community. These trips, hosted in the last week of August, are designed to provide participants with both a working set of group living and a broad network of friends and contacts to start off their time at Marlboro College.

The trips are student led by a select group of volunteers. In exchange for their time and energy, leadership, first aid and group dynamics training are provided free of charge each year. Bridges/Woods leaders may also elect to apprentice with the Outdoor Program or to pursue additional specific training and certification outside of the program via means of a Leadership Training Fund set up for that purpose.

Campus Organizations

While informal student organizations do not fall within the purview of the College administration, there are certain types of organizations for whose activities the College might be held responsible. For this reason, the Dean of Students Office has instituted a registration requirement for certain types of organized groups. The purpose of this minor formality is not to restrain the formation of such groups, but rather to give their officers and members full liberty and responsibility for carrying out their various programs.

A College organization shall register with the Dean of Students Office if:

  • it uses the name “Marlboro” in its title, and/or,
  • it invites the public to its meetings, invites outside speakers, or holds official communication with the public in any form.

Registration includes a statement of the organization’s purpose, the name of one or more officers, and a copy of its by-laws or constitution, if any.

Campus Smoking Policy

See Marlboro College Bylaws, Article XIV.

Campus Store

The Marlboro College Campus Store, located in the Campus Center, is open from 12:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. The store can be found online and on Facebook.

The store stocks all the textbooks required for courses taught at Marlboro each semester. Faculty are responsible for generating a list of textbooks for each course to be taught several months prior to the start of each semester. Timely receipt of lists allows the store manager to research each request and determine whether books will be available so that, if necessary, substitutions may be found. Where possible the store stocks used books. The store also operates a “buyback” at the end of each term, and will buy students’ books if faculty have requested them for the subsequent term. Every effort is made to stock adequate numbers of course books.

The store may stock other supplies for courses; faculty should speak to the manager several months in advance about special supplies students may need for their courses.

The Campus Store stocks a selection of fiction, non-fiction and reference books, as well as college clothing, school and art supplies, snacks and sundries. Faculty and staff receive a 10 percent discount on most items.

The store accepts VISA, MasterCard, and Discover Card, debit cards, personal and traveler’s checks and cash.

For further information visit https://www.marlboro.edu/bookstore/

Clear Writing Requirement

General Information

The Clear Writing Program

Procedures for Meeting the Clear Writing Requirement

English Discontinuance

Reapplying After English Discontinuance

  General Information

Clear writing both promotes and reflects clear thinking; it is thus a skill essential to a Marlboro education. The College therefore requires all students to show that they can write clear, well-argued and correct expository prose, to help them succeed in courses and tutorials and, ultimately, in the Plan of Concentration. Students meet this requirement by presenting to the Faculty a 4000 word portfolio within three semesters of matriculation, except as provided below.

  The Clear Writing Program

The Clear Writing Program helps students develop the skills they need to meet the Clear Writing Requirement. Associated with the Program are the resources described below:

The English Committee is composed of the writing instructors and four other faculty members (one from each area of the curriculum). The committee

  • evaluates portfolios (see Evaluation of Portfolios),
  • makes recommendations to the faculty regarding discontinuance and extension of students who have not met the requirement,
  • makes recommendations to the Dean of Faculty regarding reinstatement of students who have been discontinued,
  • recommends policies regarding the Clear Writing Requirement to the faculty,
  • recommends writing and bibliographical handbooks to the faculty,
  • judges submissions in the Freshman-Sophomore Essay Contest.

The Chair of the English Committee is a full-time writing instructor. At the end of each academic year, the full-time writing instructors, upon consultation with the English Committee (and, if necessary, with the Dean of Faculty), decide which of them will serve as Chair in the coming year.

The Chair oversees the Committee’s administration of the Clear Writing Requirement regulations and, in association with the other writing instructors, coordinates the day-to-day operations of the Clear Writing Program. Further, the Chair attends to the administrative details surrounding

    • placement,
    • submission and evaluation of Clear Writing Requirement portfolios,
    • discontinuance of students who have not met the Clear Writing Requirement,
    • examination of the reinstatement portfolios of discontinued students.

The Chair, upon consultation with the English Committee (and, when necessary, with the appropriate Dean), grants exceptions to the regulations governing the Clear Writing Requirement when individual cases warrant.

The Writing Instructors are faculty members whose primary academic responsibility is to teach courses that enable students to develop their writing skills. In addition to serving as permanent members of the English Committee, the Writing Instructors, in concert with the Director of Academic Support Services, appoint and train the Writing Tutors.

The Designated Writing Teachers are faculty members who teach Designated Writing Courses, thus enabling students to work on their writing skills in all areas of the curriculum. Generally, each division of the curriculum provides at least one Designated Writing Course per semester, but no faculty member is expected to teach more than one Designated Writing Course per year.

The Learning Resource Center provides information, workshops, and assistance to the college community in matters relating to study skills, learning and teaching strategies, and learning styles. Accommodations granted under the ADA and Section 508 are made through the Dean of Students office. Students can receive regular academic support tutorials through the Learning Resources Center. These tutorials focus on the development of an effective writing process, strategies for managing large amounts of reading, and organizing time, materials, and ideas.

The Student Writing Tutors are Work-Study students of sophomore standing or above who are selected by the Writing Instructors and trained to help other students improve their writing. The Writing Tutors report to the Writing Instructors, with whom they meet periodically during the semester.

  Procedures for Meeting the Clear Writing Requirement

Orientation Week

During Orientation the writing instructors will meet with all incoming students at the Preliminary Writing Workshop to explain the Clear Writing Requirement and the support available for students who are attempting to pass it. Students are encouraged to ask questions about Clear Writing at the Workshop. The Writing Instructors will also be available throughout the first week of classes to meet with students and their advisors as they plan their approach to writing in the first semester. Students should discuss their plans to meet the Clear Writing Requirement with their advisors in their first advising meeting, before Introductory Classes start. (See “Planning to Meet the Requirement and the Timetable for submissions” below.)

There are no exemptions from the Clear Writing Requirement. All student, must submit a portfolio for the Clear Writing Requirement by the end of their second semester of enrollment.

The First Year: the Writing Courses

Designated Writing Courses (“DWCs”) are regular courses in a variety of disciplines in which students must write at least 4000 words per semester. It is assumed that students in designated writing courses will write several short papers over the course of the semester, so they can work with their teachers on whatever weaknesses affect their writing.

Any course not already designated a writing course may be so designated for an individual student by arrangement with the instructor and the Chair of the English Committee.

Until they are writing at Plan level, students who have passed the Clear Writing Requirement are expected to take one course requiring substantial and regular writing per semester between the time they meet the Requirement and the time at which they submit a Preliminary Plan Application.

Writing Links are 4-credit writing courses that are linked to other courses in the curriculum (usually Designated Writing Courses). Students in writing links draw the content of their papers from their “linked” courses; in the writing link itself they work intensively on the writing of those papers. For the purposes of the Clear Writing Requirement, taking a Writing Link and as associated DWC is equivalent to taking a Writing Seminar. Students taking writing links may also take Elements of Style or a second Designated Writing Course during the same semester.

Writing Seminars are 4-credit, topic-based courses designed for students who need to work intensively on their reading and writing skills in order to meet the Requirement. Students who take a Writing Seminar may also take a Designated Writing Course during the same semester.

Elements of Style is a 3- or 4-credit course that focuses on grammar and style. The course is designed for students who already have a grasp of the basic elements of argument and structure but who need to work further on style. Students taking Elements of Style may also take a Designated Writing Course or a Writing Seminar in the same semester.

  1. Planning to Meet the Requirement and the Timetable for Submissions

All students will meet with their academic advisor in the first week of classes to develop a strategy for meeting the writing requirement within three semesters. The student and the advisor should take into account the student’s score on the writing placement exam, the student’s past experience with writing and the student’s academic interests. The student should plan on taking either a Designated Writing Course or a Writing Seminar in his or her first semester.

All students must submit a portfolio to the English Committee by the end of their second semester (see “Submission of a Portfolio,” below); they are encouraged to submit a portfolio at the end of their first semester. Students who either

  1. do not submit a portfolio in their first semester, or
  2. submit a portfolio but do not pass the Clear Writing requirement in their first semester

are expected to take a Writing Seminar, Designated Writing Course or Elements of Style in each subsequent semester until they pass.

  1. Submission of a Portfolio

A writing portfolio consists of 4000 words of expository writing assigned in Marlboro classes. (See Guidelines for Portfolio Submission below for details.)

Full-time freshmen and sophomores are required to submit a writing portfolio for evaluation by the English Committee by the end of their second semester of full-time enrollment. Students are encouraged to submit a portfolio by the end of their first semester in order to better assess their strengths and weaknesses. Students should consult with their writing instructors and their academic advisors about submitting in their first semester.

Full-time transfer students have the same rights and responsibilities regarding portfolio submission as entering freshman do. Students transferring as juniors or seniors, however, must submit a portfolio at the end of their first semester of enrollment, and every semester thereafter until they have met the requirement. Junior and Senior transfer students who do not meet the Clear Writing Requirement by the second semester of their senior year will not be allowed to work further on Plan until they meet the Clear Writing Requirement.

Part-time freshmen and sophomores must submit a portfolio at the end of the first semester by which they have earned 30 Marlboro credits; they are urged to submit at the end of their first semester. Part-time students whose portfolio does not meet the Requirement in their first submission must submit a portfolio each semester thereafter; if they have not met the Requirement by the time they have accumulated 45 credits, they will be subject to discontinuance.

Part-time junior and senior transfers must submit a portfolio at the end of the first semester by which they have earned 15 Marlboro credits; they are urged as well to submit at the end of their first semester. Part- time juniors and seniors who do not meet the requirement in their first submission must submit a portfolio each semester thereafter. Part-time juniors and seniors who do not meet the writing requirement by the time they have reached “Senior 2” status will not be allowed to work further on Plan until they meet the writing requirement.

Students who submit portfolios as required but do not meet the Clear Writing Requirement by the end of their second semester (or, in the case of Junior and Senior transfers, by the end of their first semester) will be allowed to submit again at the end of the following semester.

  1. Guidelines for Portfolio Submission

Portfolios that do not comply with these guidelines will be disqualified, and students submitting them in the second semester will not be allowed a third semester in which to meet the Requirement.

Content

  1. All papers submitted must be non-fiction, and all must have been written for Marlboro classes or tutorials.
  2. If a paper has not yet been graded by a Marlboro instructor, its authenticity must be validated by the instructor’s signature.
  3. At least one essay must incorporate research. Research papers should show substantial consultation of at least three different sources (not including the primary text(s) the paper discusses); they should also exhibit standard bibliographical form: i.e., either footnotes or parenthetical references, depending on the discipline, and a bibliography or list of works cited.

Page Requirements

  1. The portfolio must contain at least 4000 words of text. Pages of footnotes, bibliography, or charts, are not counted in the total
  2. A student may submit one 4000 word paper or several essays. At least one of the essays submitted must exceed 1250 words in length.

Format

  1. All the submitted essays must be placed in a folder (not an envelope). The front of the folder must clearly display the following information:
    • student’s full name
    • student’s home address
    • advisor’s name
    • student’s class standing (e.g., first semester freshman)
    • number of the submission (e.g., first submission to the English Committee)
  1. All submissions must be printed in an appropriate typeface and dark print, double-spaced on 8 1/2 X 11 inch paper with 1-inch margins.
  2. Each essay should be stapled in the upper left hand corner and the pages numbered.
  3. Each essay must have a title page which displays, in addition to the title of the paper, the student’s name, the course title, the course instructor’s name, the date the paper was submitted to the instructor, and a brief description of the assignment.
  4. Printed papers that have been neatly corrected in ink may be submitted; papers which would be difficult to read because of corrections should be reprinted. If there is any doubt, revise and reprint.
  5. If the submitted essay is reprinted or rewritten, the student must clip it to the original, graded essay.

Evaluation of Portfolios

Portfolios are evaluated by the English Committee, with the assistance of other members of the faculty. No reader may evaluate portfolios that contain papers assigned in his/her class; the student’s papers, therefore, must stand on their own as pieces which can be understood by an intelligent reader in any field. Each portfolio is evaluated by two readers; if evaluations differ, the portfolio is given to a third reader.

One of the two readers for portfolios submitted by students who have not met the Clear Writing Requirement in the previous semester must be a member of the English Committee. All six members of the committee read portfolios of students subject to discontinuance before the recommendation to discontinue is made.

Portfolio Scores

The faculty readers each fill out a Writing Profile Evaluation of the portfolio in which they evaluate, on a scale of 1 to 4, the papers’ rhetorical/conceptual strength, structure, grammar, syntax, punctuation, diction, and bibliographical accuracy. The scale appears below.

  1. Numerous, flagrant problems demonstrate need for immediate remedial study.
  2. The pattern of errors indicates that the writer has an uncertain grasp of indicated elements.
  3. The writing is fundamentally sound, but the pattern of problems suggests careless editing and/or breaches of formal precision.
  4. The papers demonstrate clear and consistent grasp of writing skills. There may be occasional errors in judgment, but overall the papers demonstrate a masterful command of both the subject and the writing.

A score of 3.0 indicates the achievement of writing skills that will allow the student to continue successfully at Marlboro. A score of 3.5 or above indicates that the student is approaching the minimum level of expertise required for Plan.

Results of the evaluation

Students who receive evaluations of 3.0 or higher on their portfolios have met the Requirement, but they should work on problems noted by their readers. These students should continue to take courses and tutorials that require them to write, so that they will not lose their skills as they progress toward Plan.

Students who receive an evaluation below 3.0 on either a first- or second-semester submission must compile a new portfolio that demonstrates their writing progress; to this end, students must take the backup course for which they have contracted. These students are required to submit a portfolio by the end of the next semester.

Second- and third-submission portfolios must contain a minimum of ten pages of writing from the current semester, and the writing included from previous submissions should show signs of substantial recent revision.

  English Discontinuance

All students who have not received an evaluation of 3.0 or better on their portfolios by the end of their third semester are subject to discontinuance upon faculty vote, unless the English Committee, the academic advisor of the student in question, the Dean of Faculty and the Director of Academic Advising jointly recommends a fourth semester and the faculty approves the recommendation.

Students will be discontinued automatically if

a) they do not submit a portfolio at the end of their second semester;

b) they submit a portfolio at the end of the second semester which is disqualified by the English Committee; or

c) they submit a failing portfolio at the end of their second semester but have not taken either a Writing Seminar or a Designated Writing Course in each of their first two semesters.

Exceptions will only be granted if the student receives a Dean’s Excuse, and if that excuse is received by the English Committee BEFORE the portfolio due date. When students are notified of their discontinuance, they receive instructions to help guide them through the reinstatement process. In no case will a student be granted more than a total of four semesters to pass the Requirement.

  Reapplying After English Discontinuance

As the Clear Writing Requirement Contract for Reinstatement indicates, after not less than three months and not more than two years from the date of discontinuance, students who have been discontinued and wish to be reinstated must submit a reinstatement portfolio that consists of ten pages of new writing to the English Committee for evaluation.

To produce their reinstatement portfolios, discontinued students must enroll in a composition course at an accredited community college or college other than Marlboro. Academic credit may be transferred to Marlboro if a grade of C-or better has been earned.

The reinstatement portfolio may also be the product of a private tutorial taken with a faculty member of an accredited community college or college other than Marlboro.

Both the student and the instructor must sign the Contract For Reinstatement. The student’s tutor or composition course instructor must also sign the cover page of each submission in the reinstatement portfolio.

If the English Committee judges the reinstatement portfolio to be of sufficient quality, the student must then take an on-campus writing evaluation to confirm the integrity of the submission. The Chair of the English Committee reads the writing evaluation.

  • If the writing evaluation does not seem to confirm the reinstatement portfolio, the Chair refers the writing evaluation to the English Committee for review. After the review, the English Committee recommends either reinstatement or further discontinuance to the Academic Dean.
  • If the evaluation confirms the reinstatement portfolio, the Chair, on behalf of the English Committee, recommends reinstatement to the Academic Dean.

Students who are readmitted re-enter Marlboro College for one conditional semester. At the end of that semester, they must submit a 4000 word Clear Writing Requirement portfolio to the English Committee for review. (See Submission of a Portfolio.) The ten pages of new writing used in a student’s reinstatement portfolio may not under any circumstances be used in the portfolio submitted to the English Committee for completion of the Clear Writing Requirement.

Students who remain discontinued for 2 years or longer will be considered withdrawn from the College. These students must apply to the College through the Dean of Faculty, who will consult with the English Committee. Students thus readmitted must follow the regular procedure for readmittance after discontinuance: i.e., submit ten pages of new writing, and submit a 4000 word portfolio at the end of the semester.


Community Assistance and Resources for Victims of Sexual Misconduct, Dating and Domestic Violence and/or Stalking

Confidential Resources: Survivor Advocate

Confidential Resources: Total Health Center

Assistance with Reporting to Off-Campus Resources

Reach Out App

  A. Confidential Resources: Survivor Advocate

Marlboro College has also designated a Survivor Advocate as an on campus confidential resource. The Survivor Advocate’s contact information is:

Megan Grove
Coordinator for Campus Prevention, Intervention, and Advocacy
survivoradvocate@marlboro.edu
Gander 2 Office # 802-258-9227

The Survivor Advocate [2] is a member of the staff whose responsibilities include providing first-responder support to those who may have been subject to a violation of the policy, which includes providing and referring to resources on and off campus, and advocating for, and/or advising complainants during institutional disciplinary processes. The Survivor Advocate will assist the Title IX Coordinator and the Dean of Students in educating and training staff, faculty, and students on issues of sexual misconduct and the policy overall. The Survivor Advocate may also be involved in staff and faculty training, and campus education on issues pertaining to sexual misconduct and the response of the College to reports of possible violations of the Policy and criminal acts. While the College will observe qualified confidentiality/privacy principles explained below as to communications involving the Survivor Advocate, the Survivor Advocate does not have the protection from being required to provide information or testimony in a judicial proceeding that is enjoyed by, for example, licensed counselors or health care professionals.

Absent exceptional circumstances, the Survivor Advocate will respect and protect communications with a complainant that the complaint intends to be confidential. In most cases, the Survivor Advocate will not inform anyone of such communications without a complainant’s consent, and the College will not endeavor to take any action in response to such communications. The Survivor Advocate may disclose otherwise-confidential information appropriately when they perceive an immediate and/or serious threat to the campus community. In addition, the Survivor Advocate would report any allegation of sexual assault of a person under the age of 18. Individuals who wish to talk about sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking-related issues confidentially, with the understanding that the College will not take any action based on such issues except where safety issues are present as described above, are encouraged to contact the Survivor Advocate. In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Survivor Advocate would report non-personally-identifying information about Clery crimes they learn about communications intended to be confidential for purposes of the College’s compilation of campus crime statistics. The Survivor Advocate would also report non-personally identifying information about reports received (but intended to be confidential) to the Title IX Coordinator.

If an individual who makes a report insists that their name or other identifying information not be revealed and the College is able to respect that request, the College will be unable to conduct an investigation into the particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against the respondent. Even so, the Survivor Advocate will still assist the individual in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, academic support or accommodations, disability, health or mental health services, changes to living, working or course schedules, and transportation-related accommodations, where requested and reasonably available. An individual who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the College or report the incident to local law enforcement, and thus have the incident fully investigated. The Survivor Advocate will provide the individual with assistance if the individual wishes to pursue those options.

  B. Confidential Resources: Total Health Center

At Marlboro College, the Total Health Center staff respect and protect confidential communications with clients to the extent that they are able to do so under applicable law. This means that, in most cases, these confidential resources will not inform anyone of such communications without a client’s consent, and the College will not endeavor to take any action in response to such communications. These professionals may have the responsibility to disclose otherwise-privileged information appropriately when they perceive an immediate and/or serious threat to any person or property. In addition, medical and mental health professionals are required by law to report any allegation of sexual assault of a person under age 18. Individuals who wish to talk about sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking-related issues confidentially, with the understanding that the College will not take any action based on such confidential communications, are encouraged to contact one of these confidential resources. In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, these confidential resources will not report Clery crimes they learn about through confidential communications for purposes of the College’s compilation of campus crime statistics.

  C. Assistance with Reporting to Off-Campus Resources

There are a variety of off-campus resources that individuals can utilize for any violations or perceived violations of this Policy, including:

Women’s Freedom Center

802-254-6954

Vermont Mental Health Services

802-254-0028

Brattleboro Hospital Emergency Room

802-257-8222

Windham County Sheriff

802-365-4942

Vermont State Police

802-254-2382

The College will offer to assist complainants to notify appropriate law enforcement authorities of misconduct prohibited by this policy, if desired by the complainant. The complainant may also choose not to notify law enforcement. The College will also offer to assist complainants in seeking relief from abuse orders or other orders of protection from state courts if desired by complainants, and the College will provide what assistance it reasonably can provide on campus to implement directives made in such orders.

  D. Reach Out App

Reach Out is a mobile app that allows community members to access policy information, on and off campus resources, and education around sexual and interpersonal violence. Reach Out is private and allows easy access to information around Marlboro’s policy and procedures. A link to Reach Out is here: https://www.capptivation.com/reach-out/marlboro-college/default.html

 

  [2] The Survivor Advocate is a Campus Security Authority (CSA) who is required to report all criminal activity to the Marlboro College administration but in most cases is not required to give identifying information when making the reports. The College does not disclose identifying information about reported victims in any of its Clery Act-required reporting.

Complaint Procedure Overview

Complaint Procedure Overview

Informal Complaint Resolution Procedure

Formal Complaint Resolution Procedure

  Complaint Procedure Overview

Complaints may be formal or informal, or a person who has concerns about a possible violation of this Policy may seek anonymous counseling rather than filing a complaint. Anonymous counseling enables the complainant to speak with a counselor in Health Services (in the Total Health Center) or the Survivor’s Advocate to seek advice, feedback, or additional resources, after experiencing or witnessing conduct that may violate this Policy, but without naming the involved parties or initiating a formal or informal procedure. Conversations with Health Services or the Survivor’s Advocate are confidential, except as described above. The complainant may initiate a formal or informal complaint, or file a criminal charge or a civil complaint, at any time.

If Marlboro College receives a complaint (through a non-confidential source) of conduct that would, if substantiated, violate this Policy or otherwise has reason to believe that such conduct has occurred, it will take prompt and equitable remedial action to the extent appropriate and possible under the circumstances. Marlboro College will honor a complainant’s request for confidentiality wherever possible, though the College notes that in certain instances the College may be required by law and/or community safety considerations to take action if it learns of misconduct or retaliation in violation of this Policy, even if an affected party does not wish to file a complaint, in order to maintain a safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all members of the Marlboro College Community. As much as possible in light of these considerations, Marlboro College will protect the identity of the person making the complaint and the respondent, except as is reasonably necessary to complete a full and impartial investigation.

The College’s procedures are designed and will be implemented to be prompt, fair, and impartial from the investigation to the final result. The College’s procedures will be conducted by officials who, at a minimum, receive annual training on the issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

In the event that a complainant exercises the right to file a complaint with the police or the state’s attorney and a criminal investigation ensues, Marlboro College will at the request of law enforcement officials suspend temporarily the fact finding phase of its investigation under this Complaint Procedure, if it is not yet concluded, until the criminal investigation completes its initial evidence-gathering phase. Although the fact finding will be suspended temporarily, the rights, as applicable, of both the complainant and the respondent, as articulated in this document, will be maintained and Marlboro College will take whatever action it deems necessary for the safety and well-being of the complainant and the College community, including, but not limited to, third party supervision, a no contact agreement, housing relocation, emergency suspension or alternative grade review.

Both informal and formal complaints are initiated by reporting the situation to the Title IX Coordinator (jkiewel@marlboro.edu) or any responsible employee. The Title IX Coordinator will meet with the complainant to discuss the complaint and explain the options the complainant can pursue: a confidential discussion in which no individual is identified and the complainant is referred to counseling at Total Health Services or the Survivor Advocate, an informal complaint resolution procedure, which identifies the respondent, or a formal complaint resolution procedure that initiates an investigation and hearing. The Title IX Coordinator will provide a Notice of Rights and Options at this time as well.

Whichever procedure a person utilizes, the College will endeavor to provide a prompt and equitable resolution for all parties, and to honor the rights outlined below.

  A. Informal Complaint Resolution Procedure

If after receiving information about their rights and options and the ability to pursue resolution through the College’s formal complaint resolution procedure, the complainant decides to pursue an informal resolution, the Title IX Coordinator will obtain information from the complainant about the objectionable behavior and will discuss the complainant’s desired resolution. Following this meeting, the Title IX Coordinator will then meet with the respondent, without the complainant. The Title IX Coordinator will explain this Policy and the prohibition on retaliation. During this meeting the Title IX Coordinator will listen to the respondent’s understanding of what transpired, and determine whether or not the respondent acknowledges doing harm to the complainant and accepts responsibility for doing harm to the complainant, and/or whether the matter is otherwise appropriate to pursue an informal complaint resolution option. If the respondent acknowledges doing harm to the complainant and accepts responsibility for doing harm to the complainant, and/or the College determines that the matter is otherwise appropriate for informal resolution, the Title IX Coordinator will present to the respondent the complainant’s complaint and desired resolution. Either the complainant or respondent may opt out of this procedure at any point, and the College may determine at any point that the matter is not appropriate for informal resolution. In rare instances where there is an ongoing threat to the College’s ability to maintain a safe, nondiscriminatory campus, the College may decide to investigate and take action, despite a complainant’s decision to opt out of or terminate the informal complaint process. The Title IX Coordinator may elect to offer other or additional alternative dispute resolution procedures to the parties such as an outside mediator.

Following the meeting with the respondent, the Title IX Coordinator may obtain a commitment or written agreement from the respondent to comply with the College’s Policy, which will include compliance with the Policy and may outline appropriate future conduct and behavior. The Title IX Coordinator will make a written record to be kept on file in the Title IX Coordinator’s office. The Title IX Coordinator will inform both the complainant and the respondent that the Title IX Coordinator’s observations and written records might be subpoenaed at a later date and could become evidence in a later civil or criminal proceeding or College proceeding. The Title IX Coordinator will encourage both the complainant and the respondent to seek advice from independent and/or confidential sources. If any party, including the Title IX Coordinator, is not satisfied with the progress or result of the informal complaint resolution procedure, the party may ask to begin the formal complaint resolution procedure. Use of the informal procedures set forth in this section is not a prerequisite to initiating a formal complaint. The College will endeavor to resolve informal complaints within forty-five (45) days of the initial report to the College, absent extenuating circumstances (such as delays occasioned by College breaks). The College will keep the parties informed regarding the need for any extensions of this period.

At the discretion of the Title IX Coordinator, in the instance wherein two (2) or more informal complaints against a single respondent concerning separate incidents have been filed, or other instances where deemed appropriate by the Title IX Coordinator, the Title IX Coordinator may begin the formal complaint procedure. The Title IX Coordinator will notify any complainants of the initiation of this process. Complainants may participate in the formal complaint process but are not required to. Testimony given in the informal complaint procedure may be seen by the Panel. All complainants will retain the rights derived from the Statement of the Complainant’s Rights in this document.

  B. Formal Complaint Resolution Procedure

Any person who is subject to or knows of conduct that may violate this Policy may initiate a formal complaint, which will result in an investigation and review by the Panel on Sexual Misconduct, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, and Stalking. This investigation will entail interviews with the complainant and respondent, as well as witnesses. The procedure will involve the Panel’s making a decision, based on a preponderance of the evidence standard, on whether or not this Policy has been violated, and a recommendation of sanctions, if any, from the Panel to the Dean of Students (if the Respondent is a student), the Dean of Faculty (if the respondent is a faculty member) or the Chief Human Resources Officer (if the respondent is a staff member). The Title IX Coordinator will provide information and guidance to all parties, and both complainants and respondents may have an Advisor or Support Person to help them navigate this Policy and process, including any meetings related to the case. The Title IX Coordinator is available to assist both parties in finding suitable Advisors or Support Persons, who need not be members of the Marlboro College Community. The College will endeavor to complete its investigation and hearing process (exclusive of any appeal) within sixty (60) days of the initial report to the College, absent extenuating circumstances (such as delays occasioned by College breaks). The College will keep the parties informed regarding the need for any extensions of this period. The College will simultaneously notify, in writing, both the complainant and the respondent of the result of any institutional disciplinary proceeding that arises from an alleged violation of this Policy, the procedures for appeal, any changes to the result through the appeal process, and when results become final.

  1. The Title IX coordinator shall review the complaint and take immediate action to ensure the safety of the complainant and the campus. This may include the issuance of no contact orders between the parties, or other orders regarding the parties and interactions until an initial assessment of the case can be completed. The College may also at any time take appropriate steps, including by way of example only, issuance of No Contact Orders and/or No Trespass Orders, temporary changes in assignment of duties or housing, changes in schedules or program requirements, transportation or working accommodations, or other accommodations, if requested and reasonably available, to protect complaining parties on an interim basis. These measures can be taken if requested and reasonably available, regardless of whether a complainant pursues a complaint under this policy. As noted above, interim measures for respondents will similarly be received and addressed on a case-by-case basis.
  2. After an initial discussion, the complainant will be asked to prepare (or describe to the Title IX Coordinator or designee and sign) a written statement describing the complaint. The statement should include information such as the date and time of the alleged sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, the name of the respondent, the circumstances of the alleged misconduct, and the identity of any persons who may have knowledge or information regarding the circumstances. If the Title IX Coordinator reviews the complaint and determines that there would be no violation of this Policy even if all the facts are taken as true, then the Title IX Coordinator will inform the complainant and no investigation will be conducted. The Title IX Coordinator will still endeavor to help the complainant receive counseling and any other necessary accommodations, as reasonably available, even if the complaint is not accepted for investigation.
  3. Otherwise, within a reasonably prompt period of time from when the complaint or the request to move forward with the formal complaint resolution procedure was received, the Title IX Coordinator will notify the complainant and the respondent in writing that a complaint has been filed and provide both parties with a copy of the complaint. The notification will include any conditions to be observed during the investigation, for example, third party supervision, no contact or alternative grade review. The appropriate Dean or supervisor will implement the conditions. The notification will also include a copy of and/or link to this Policy.
  4. The Title IX Coordinator will also identify for the complainant and respondent the investigator who has been identified to investigate the matter, as described below. If a party objects to the participation of the identified investigator because of a real or perceived conflict of interest, the Title IX Coordinator will decide whether the objection justifies the appointment of an alternate investigator. This process will be repeated as necessary until an unbiased, neutral investigator is identified. If it is determined that an investigation and adjudication should proceed under this policy, an investigator will be appointed to conduct an investigation that is appropriate under the circumstances, and is prompt, thorough, fair, equitable, objective and impartial.
  5. The Title IX Coordinator will investigate the complaint, or if a conflict of interest on the part of the Title IX coordinator is identified and confirmed, or doing so is otherwise determined to be appropriate, the Title IX Coordinator will locate a neutral investigator (“Investigator”) to conduct an investigation. The investigation will ordinarily include interviews of the complainant, respondent, and any witnesses with relevant information. The Investigator will notify the parties and witnesses of their obligation to maintain the confidentiality of the investigation and to not engage in retaliation.
  6. The Title IX Coordinator will remind all parties that either the complainant or the respondent may opt out of the formal complaint resolution process and request an informal resolution at any point. The investigation will proceed even if the respondent opts out of the formal complaint resolution process. An informal resolution may be pursued if both parties agree and the respondent acknowledges doing harm to the complainant and accepts responsibility for doing harm to the complainant, and/or informal resolution is otherwise deemed appropriate by the College. While the complainant may opt out of the formal complaint resolution process or withdraw the complaint, the complainant should be aware that in instances where there is an ongoing threat to the College’s ability to maintain a safe, nondiscriminatory campus, the College may decide to investigate and take action, despite a complainant’s decision to opt out of or terminate the formal complaint process. The respondent shall be requested to file a written response to the complaint as soon as reasonably possible. The complainant shall be provided with a copy of the response. The complainant may then reply to that response as soon as reasonably possible. The respondent shall promptly be provided with a copy any reply of the complainant. The investigator may elect to wait a reasonable period of time for these statements before proceeding further with the investigation.
  7. To the extent permitted by law, the complainant and respondent will be afforded the same rights and opportunities throughout the investigation and adjudication process, including the opportunity to recommend witnesses and submit evidence. However, the decision to interview particular witnesses or consider evidence offered by the parties is within the sole discretion of the investigator, in consultation with the Title IX Coordinator as necessary.
  8. Complainants and respondents are entitled to the same opportunities to have an advisor or support person of their choice present at any interviews or meetings related to the investigation and adjudication process under this policy. Such advisors or support persons may advise the complainant or respondent privately, but cannot act as speaking advocates at a meeting. Witnesses in the case may not serve as advisors. An investigator or other College representative may terminate meetings and proceed with meetings without an advisor present if advisors or support persons refuse to comply with these requirements. The College may at its discretion decide to reschedule meetings with an alternate advisor.
  9. If a complainant or respondent is concerned that another person involved in the investigation or adjudication (such as, for example, an investigator or the Title IX Coordinator) may be biased or have a conflict of interest, the person should inform the Title IX Coordinator or President’s Office (if the concern is about the Title IX Coordinator) of that concern immediately. The Title IX Coordinator or alternate person, as applicable, will consider the concern and inform the parties of a decision as to whether an alternate will be named.
  10. The College’s investigation and adjudication process does not require or permit the complainant and respondent to interact or communicate directly or indirectly with each other at any time. The parties are therefore not permitted to question or cross-examine each other directly during the course of the investigation.
  11. The Investigator is authorized to contact any and all individuals with potentially relevant information. The College recognizes, however, that individuals who are bound by legal privileges may not be able to disclose privileged information, unless an exception applies. The Investigator is authorized to access relevant records, except those legally protected as confidential or privileged, and may collect any additional evidence relevant to the complaint. The nature and scope of the investigation is within the sole discretion of the Investigator and/or the College.
  12. The complainant and respondent will be asked to identify all relevant evidence they would like the Investigator to review, as well as witnesses they would like the investigator to interview. Both parties may provide, if they wish, a list of questions they would like the Investigator to ask of particular witnesses or of each other. The Investigator is not required to consider the evidence submitted or interview any particular witness, even if identified by one of the parties, nor to ask questions provided by either party. However, in determining whether to interview witnesses or review evidence, the Investigator should consider such factors as relevance, bearing on credibility, equity, fairness, thoroughness, and impartial treatment of both parties.
  13. All participants in the investigation are expected to cooperate fully by providing complete, accurate, and truthful information. They may also be expected to sign statements or other documents memorializing the information they provided, and may be asked to keep the substance of the interview confidential. Failure to cooperate fully with the Investigator may subject the individual to the full range of disciplinary actions, as applicable.
  14. Formal rules of evidence do not apply in the process described herein. In cases where an evidentiary or procedural question arises in connection with the investigation or adjudication process, the Title IX Coordinator will make a decision on such questions.
  15. At the conclusion of the investigation, the Investigator shall issue a preliminary report which shall include the witness statements and other relevant material. The complainant and respondent may review the preliminary report, witness statements and other relevant materials. Both will have an opportunity to respond to this information in writing and request changes or consideration of additional evidence within seven calendar days. In their response, the parties may provide, if they wish, a list of further questions they would like the Investigator to ask of particular witnesses or of each other. The Investigator is not required to consider the evidence submitted or interview any particular witness, even if identified by one of the parties, nor to ask questions provided by either party. However, in determining whether to interview witnesses or review evidence, the Investigator should consider such factors as equity, fairness, thoroughness, and impartial treatment of both parties.
  16. If at any stage following the submission of these responses new relevant evidence is gathered, it will be shared with the complainant and respondent, who will have an opportunity to submit a written response within a time frame determined by the Title IX Coordinator.
  17. The Investigator will submit a final report to the Title IX Coordinator. The final report will include all investigation materials deemed permissible, the complainant’s and respondent’s written responses, the investigator’s recommended finding of whether this Policy has been violated, and the investigator’s rationale. This recommendation will be based on the standard of preponderance of evidence, i.e., whether it is more likely than not that the Policy was violated.
  18. If the Title IX Coordinator is not the investigator, the Title IX Coordinator will review the investigator’s report and recommendation and determine whether any further investigation needs to be done. If so, the Title IX Coordinator will direct the investigator to perform additional investigation as deemed necessary.
  19. Once the Title IX Coordinator is satisfied that the investigation is complete they will provide the report and recommendation to the Panel on Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking, and to each of the parties, as applicable. The Panel considers investigation reports, evidence collected in investigations, and the parties’ responses, and deliberates and makes decisions as to whether or not this Policy has been violated.
  20. The Panel is not bound by the Investigator’s report and recommendation; rather, these are advisory to the Panel. The Panel may accept or reject the investigator’s recommendation in whole or in part, and may request additional relevant information or investigation before making a determination. If the Panel requests such additional relevant information or investigation, the Panel will provide notice to the parties of any additional information gathered in response to such requests. The parties may then have two days to provide to the Panel a written statement regarding their perspectives on the additional information, if they choose to do so. The Panel may consult with other persons as deemed appropriate.
  21. Either party may choose to (but does not have to) meet individually with the Panel prior to the Panel’s determination. The Survivor Advocate may meet with the Panel on a complainant’s behalf in lieu of the complainant to present the complainant’s position, but may not advocate for the complainant before the Panel. The respondent may equally select an individual to meet with the Panel on their behalf in lieu of the respondent to present the respondent’s position, but may not advocate for the respondent before the Panel. The Panel may also request an individual meeting with either party or any other person(s) as deemed appropriate. Parties can decide either to attend a meeting at the Panel’s request, or decline the request. The Panel will not view a party’s position more or less favorably because a party chooses not to attend a meeting with the Panel. The Panel’s determination will be based on a preponderance of the evidence standard. Preponderance of the evidence means that it is more likely than not that a violation of the Policy occurred.
  22. If the Panel finds that there is insufficient evidence to find that a violation of this Policy occurred, the Panel will inform the complainant and the respondent of that, simultaneously and in writing by delivery of a copy of the Panel’s finding to the Dean of Students or their designee for delivery to the parties as soon as possible. If the Panel finds that the respondent has engaged in conduct that violates this policy, the Panel will inform the complainant and the respondent of that, simultaneously and in writing by delivery of a copy of the Panel’s finding to the Dean of Students or their designee for delivery to the parties as soon as possible and invite each party to submit within an appropriate period a Sanction Statement sharing any thoughts they would like the Panel to consider when recommending a sanction. In recommending sanctions, the Panel will consider, for example: 1) any such statements; 2) its findings regarding the case at issue; and 3) any relevant prior misconduct, information about which may be received by the Panel from College offices or officials with knowledge (i.e., the Dean of Students in student respondent cases, the Chief Human Resources Officer in staff respondent cases, the Dean of Faculty in faculty respondent cases or an ad hoc committee of the Board of Trustees, in a trustee respondent case), who will provide such information and confer with the Panel once a finding of responsibility has been made.
  23. If a determination of responsibility for a Policy violation is made, the Panel will forward its findings and recommendation of sanctions for action the Dean of Students (if the respondent is a student), the Dean of Faculty (if the respondent is a faculty member) or the Chief Human Resources Officer (if the respondent is a staff member), or an ad hoc committee of the Board of Trustees (if the respondent is a trustee), (“responsible individuals”) who will affirm or modify the proposed sanction. When this individual determines the sanction, they will, in cases in which sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking are found to have occurred, simultaneously notify in writing the complainant, the respondent and the Title IX Coordinator. In cases in which sexual harassment that does not also involve sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking is found to have occurred, the responsible individual will notify the respondent and the Title IX Coordinator of the sanctions in writing, and will, to the extent permitted by law, simultaneously notify the complainant of any sanctions that pertain to the complainant and that would have an effect on the complainant’s educational or working environment. The Panel’s findings and recommendation and the responsible individual’s sanction decision will be kept on file with the Title IX Coordinator and in the respondent’s personnel or student file.
  24. If the Panel finds that either party provided false information during the investigation or that the complainant intentionally made a false report of conduct that violates this Policy, the Panel shall recommend suitable action to the appropriate Dean or the Chief Human Resources Officer.

Computer Lab Usage Policy

Work Priority:

Academic work always has first priority over all other usage of the lab equipment. Persons doing non-academic work (non-specific web browsing, social e-mailing, pleasure writing, etc) are expected to surrender the use of the lab computers to persons who need the equipment for academic work.

Using the equipment for non-classwork related purposes has second priority. This includes just about all uses of the computer outside of game playing. Self-training, web browsing or editing, e-mailing, ftp-ing, and other uses of the equipment is allowed as long as there are machines available for those who need to do academically related work. This sort of usage is encouraged, as it allows the users to become more comfortable with the equipment.

Lab Monitor Authority:

While the lab monitors are on duty, they are the duly appointed enforcers of the lab policy. They are responsible for being sure the equipment is not being abused, as well as assuring that everyone is signing up for their time on the lab computers. They are also the persons responsible for judging what is academic work, what is non-academic work, and what is not allowed in the labs. It is their duty to keep things running smoothly in the lab, keeping the noise level down to a library-like standard, as well as resolving any conflicts regarding equipment usage. All persons using the lab are expected to listen to lab monitors, and follow their instructions. If anyone has a problem with the way a lab monitor is handling a situation, or the general behavior of the lab monitors, they should report the matter to the IT Department.

Computer Use Policy

Expectations for reasonable and ethical use of Marlboro College computing resources are congruent with the mission of the College. Computing resources are primarily intended to support the educational goals of the College; therefore, uses for academic and administrative purposes have priority. Personal use of the College’s computing resources is not explicitly prohibited as long as it does not interfere with other users’ access to resources for academic or administrative work and is not excessive. Moreover, computer users at Marlboro should “act responsibly within a self-governing community.” Please see the appendix of this handbook for the computer use policy in full.

Computer Use Policy

Please see the Acceptable Computer Use Policy on the Marlboro College Website.

Computer/Network Acceptable Use Policy

Expectations for reasonable and ethical use of Marlboro College computing resources are congruent with the Mission of the College. Computing resources are primarily intended to support the educational goals of the College; therefore, uses for academic and administrative purposes have priority. Moreover, computer users at Marlboro should act in accordance with community standards and expectations set out in Marlboro College’s Constitution and bylaws. Responsible and ethical behavior, as it pertains to computer use at Marlboro College, includes but is not limited to the following rights and responsibilities.

Rights

  • Services & Resources: Individuals may avail themselves of information technology systems (ITS) and services at the college appropriate for your role within in the community.

  • Privacy: Individuals should be aware that data files, electronic messages and internet traffic stored and/or transmitted by the Marlboro network cannot be guaranteed to be private and confidential and are traceable to individuals. Nevertheless, IT administrators at Marlboro College make every effort to treat the contents of data files, electronic mail and internet traffic  as private and confidential. Access and inspection of electronic data stored on Marlboro College servers will be governed by all standard College procedures and applicable U.S. and Vermont Laws.

  • Freedom of Expression: Following the AAUP 1967 Joint Statement on Rights and Responsibilities of Students, the College believes that community members, “should be free to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them, and to express opinions publicly and privately. They should always be free to support causes by orderly means which do not disrupt the regular and essential operation of the institution. At the same time, it should be made clear to the academic and larger community that in their public expressions or demonstrations [individuals in the community] speak only for themselves.” These freedoms of expression extend to the use of computer and Internet resources.

  • Due Process: Marlboro’s online communications are an extension of the college’s physical community and should therefore not be used to harm another member of the community. Violations of college policies, bylaws, or the constitution that occur online–through evidence that a specific user account violated the rights of an individual connect to another specific user account–shall be addressed in the same manner as if those violations had occurred in the physical community. These violations include, but are not limited to, harassment and infringing on others’ privacy or academic freedom. Misuse of ITS will be handled in the same manner as other violations and infringements of College policies and the Community Code of Conduct. In a situation where a system administrator feels the integrity of a computer system or network has been seriously threatened by an individual’s behavior, the College reserves the right to immediately suspend access pending further action by the appropriate authority.

Responsibilities

  • Legal Behavior: As in any college endeavor, individuals are required to behave in a manner consistent with state and federal law. Individuals are responsible for their own actions.

  • System Integrity: Individuals should not act in any way that could reasonably be expected to damage or compromise ITS at the College. Likewise, no one should attempt to gain unauthorized access to or try to overwhelm the system resources. Faculty, staff and students may not share passwords or attempt to access any account not assigned to them.

  • Reasonable Comport: Like within the physical community at the College, electronic communication should support the “general assumption that a code of civilized behavior, suitable to adult citizens of a democratic community, will be followed by all members of the Marlboro College Community.”

  • College Logo and Name: the college logo may not be used in electronic media without authorization by the appropriate College body. Congruent with the College Policy on Campus Organizations no individual or group may use the name Marlboro in the title of its organization without registering such organization with the Dean of Students’ Office. Individuals may not represent themselves as official agents of the college.

  • Non-Profit: Personal use of the College’s computing resources is not explicitly prohibited as long as it does not interfere with other users’ access to resources for academic or administrative work and is not excessive.

  • Internet Service Provider Policies: Use of the College’s external internet connection is also bound by any related policy of our upstream service provider(s). A violation of such policy by any individual user can jeopardize the entire College’s internet service connection. By accessing the College’s internet, users also agree to abide by these policies, listed below.

Conflict of Interest Policy

Purpose. Marlboro College is committed to the principles of integrity, good faith and fair dealing, and professional accountability in all of its business associations and transactions, and employment practices. The College has confidence in the loyalty and integrity of all members of the faculty and staff, and recognizes that their high ethical standards have been demonstrated on many occasions. In furtherance of those high standards of conduct, the purpose of this policy statement is to provide guidance on the College’s expectations with respect to any conflict of interest.

Policy. In the course of conducting College business, actual and potential conflicts of interest are occasionally present. A conflict of interest is present whenever an individual’s professional duties or obligations are compromised, appear to be compromised, or have the potential to be compromised by outside interests or concerns, personal gain or personal relationships. In order to maintain the integrity of Marlboro College and its programs and practices, College employees are expected to observe the following guidelines:

  1. Employees shall disclose any interest in any business or financial investment that might influence or give the impression of influencing his/her official decisions or actions on College matters.
  2. Employees shall avoid any business activity or investments that may in any way conflict or compete with similar activities on the part of the College.
  3. Employees shall refrain from any business activity or purchase or sale of securities or property that is based on confidential information or special knowledge related to the College.
  4. Employees shall not disclose without prior authorization any confidential information concerning the intentions of the College regarding investments, property acquisitions, purchasing or contracting, or any other confidential intention.
  5. Employees shall avoid outside employment or business activities involving obligations that may in any way conflict with the interests of the College.
  6. Employees may not accept or benefit from any gift, travel, meal, lodging, service, entertainment, payment of expenses, or any other item with a value exceeding $25.00 from any person or entity doing business or seeking to do business with the College.

Each employee shall disclose any and all of his or her potential or actual conflicts of interest to his or her immediate supervisor or senior staff member. Employees should consult their immediate supervisor or senior staff member whenever they are in doubt as to whether a conflict exists. Following disclosure of a conflict of interest, employees, when necessary, should recuse themselves from direct involvement in any decision-making at the College in matters related to that interest.

Anyone found to be in violation of this Conflict of Interest policy may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination from employment.

Copyright and File Sharing Policy

Marlboro College is dedicated to stopping illegal downloading and unauthorized distribution of copyrighted intellectual property. Per the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, the College must inform you of the potential Federal civil and criminal penalties for violation of Federal copyright laws. To wit, as provided by the US Department of Education:

Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement.

Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.

Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense.

For more information, please see the Web site of the U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov, especially their FAQ’s at www.copyright.gov/help/faq.

Options for downloading media legally are numerous. Aside from Marlboro’s very own streaming radio station, see http://www.educause.edu/legalcontent for some suggestions.

Corrective Action (Disciplinary Action)

As a vital member of the Marlboro College staff, you are expected to achieve the work performance expectations explained in your job descriptions and to follow College policies. Employees are expected to behave ethically, appropriately, maturely and responsibly in the workplace (see “Standards of Conduct,” below). The corrective action policy is designed to assist employees to improve unacceptable behavior or performance by identifying the underlying causes and devising appropriate solutions. Under the corrective action policy, the consequences of unacceptable behavior or performance may take a variety of forms: a verbal warning, written warning, suspension, reduction of pay, demotion or termination of employment. The College reserves the right to determine the appropriate method of corrective action in each situation. There is no prescribed progression that corrective action will follow, and the College may bypass one or all corrective action steps at its sole discretion. Generally, the College expects that a verbal warning should be sufficient to improve performance or behavior. In the absence of demonstrated or sustained improvement, additional corrective action may be necessary. Please note that any conduct considered prejudicial to the best interest of the College, whether covered in this handbook or not, may be subject to immediate corrective action in some form, up to and including termination of employment. For further information on corrective action and for instructions and descriptions on each option, please see the appendix of this handbook or contact the human resources office.

Corrective Action (Disciplinary Action) - FULL

NOTE: This section is most applicable for and relevant to staff members; however, the word “employee” is used throughout this section.

There may be times when an employee fails to meet work performance expectations explained in their job descriptions or fails to follow College policies and other policies. These situations require corrective action, a process of communicating with an employee to improve unacceptable performance or behavior. The goal is to guide the employee to correct performance or behavior by identifying problems, causes and solutions, not to punish the employee. Corrective action may include one or more of the following: a verbal warning, written warning, administrative leave without pay, reduction of pay, demotion or dismissal (termination of employment). The College reserves the right to determine the appropriate method of corrective action in each situation. Generally, the College expects that a verbal warning should be enough to correct unsatisfactory performance or behavior. If there is no improvement or if there are repeat occurrences, a more progressive corrective action approach may be appropriate. The following list of corrective actions may not be comprehensive or appropriate for all situations. There is no promise that corrective action will follow a particular progression. The College reserves the right to determine the appropriate corrective action, and it may bypass one or all steps in its sole discretion. In conjunction with the human resources office, supervisors may use other methods for correcting performance or behavior should they determine that a different method might be more successful. Documentation is an important element of the corrective-action process. Please notify the human resources office in writing (or email) prior to any corrective action taken, the reason and the performance or behavior expectation. Contact the human resources office for questions or concerns.

Verbal Warning: When unsatisfactory performance or behavior warrants a verbal warning, supervisors shall set a time and place to ensure privacy. In a conversation with just the employee (do not include co-workers, subordinates or any other person) begin with stating clearly that a verbal warning is being issued. Be specific in describing the unacceptable performance or behavior. Explain what are acceptable standards or explain what the policy is and provide any applicable written policy if available. Describe consequences of failing to correct their performance or behavior immediately and maintain the improved performance or behavior. Finally, the supervisor must notify the human resources office in writing (email is acceptable) that a verbal warning was issued and explain the reason for the warning. This note shall be included in the employee file.

Written Warning: In cases where more than a verbal warning is warranted or if a verbal warning was issued and the unsatisfactory performance or behavior continues, a supervisor may issue a written warning. In some situations, it may be appropriate to advance past a verbal warning to a written warning. Depending on the situation, more than one written warning may be issued; however, if two or more written warnings have been issued and the problem continues, alternative corrective action may be required. The human resources office can assist a supervisor in composing a written warning. A written warning shall include a clear statement of the unsatisfactory performance or behavior and a reference to prior dates verbal or written warnings were issued. If a policy infraction occurred, the warning shall include a citation of the policy and attachments of any other documents that support the conclusions being made. The written warning shall also include a description of the impact of the unsatisfactory performance or behavior, an explanation of expectations and an explanation of further consequences should the unsatisfactory performance or behavior persist (such as an intent to suspend or dismiss). The supervisor shall present one copy of the written warning to the employee and review with the employee the content of the letter. The employee shall sign a copy of the letter in acknowledgement of receipt of the warning; signing the letter need not indicate agreement with the warning. The signed letter shall be forwarded to human resources office for inclusion in the employee’s personnel file.

Administrative Leave with or without Pay: A suspension from work may be warranted in more serious situations or after at least one prior warning. That leave may be with or without pay depending upon the circumstances warranting the suspension. The human resources office must be involved in coordinating and implementing such suspensions. A written explanation of the suspension shall be hand-delivered to the employee. The written explanation shall include a statement of the reason for the suspension, a reference of prior steps taken to correct the action and a description of the impact of continued unsatisfactory performance or behavior. The written suspension explanation shall also include the number of days of the suspension and the beginning and ending dates of the suspension. It shall also include an explanation of expectations upon return to work and an explanation of further consequences should the unsatisfactory behavior or performance continue.

Reduction of Pay (within salary range) or Demotion to a Lower Classification: This alternative is available when a supervisor does not want to dismiss or suspend the employee, but judges that corrective action measures other than suspension or dismissal are necessary. This action may be temporary or permanent. A pay reduction shall not reduce an employee’s pay below the lowest level of their pay class but shall be noticeable enough to cause a correction in performance or behavior. A pay reduction may not be a viable choice if the employee is already at or near the bottom of their pay class. A demotion may be appropriate in cases of inadequate work performance or inappropriate responsibilities for the employee. A decision to demote shall be based upon a reasonable expectation that the employee will perform successfully if demoted. Contact the human resources office to initiate this process.

Dismissal (Termination of Employment): This action may be appropriate in cases of particularly serious misconduct or poor performance, or if unsatisfactory performance or behavior continues after verbal or written warnings or alternative forms of corrective action have been tried. In very serious situations of gross misconduct or policy infractions, immediate dismissal may be the only appropriate corrective action. The corrective action policy does not apply to employees during probationary periods. Contact the human resources office for assistance in facilitating the dismissal process.

Serious policy infractions, severe unsatisfactory performance, behavior or gross misconduct may result in immediate dismissal without warning. Gross misconduct may include, but is not necessarily limited to: any act or behavior that may, in the College’s judgment, seriously disrupt or disturb the normal operation of the institution; any work-related conduct which would subject the employee to criminal conviction; theft or dishonesty; gross insubordination; destruction of College property; falsification of records; misrepresentations; severe policy violations; acts of moral turpitude; or violence. Termination of employment due to gross misconduct may disqualify an employee from unemployment benefits.

Credit Placement

Advanced Placement Examinations

International Baccalaureate

Field Trips

  Advanced Placement Examinations

The Advanced Placement Program, sponsored by the College Board and administered by Educational Testing Service, offers secondary school students the opportunity to participate in challenging college-level course work while still in high school. Marlboro College will grant up to 4 credits per exam for Advanced Placement Examinations with a score of 4 or 5. No more than 16 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations. Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration. Students should be aware that adding AP or other exam and transfer credits to their record will accelerate their progress toward Plan-related requirements. AP credits are awarded only at the beginning of any semester and generally only through the Sophomore 2 semester; no exam or transfer credits may be removed from the transcript once added. 

  International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is a rigorous course of study leading to examinations. Marlboro College will award credit for higher level examinations with scores of 5, 6 or 7. Each course will be awarded four credits.

Important: No more than 24 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations. Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration.

  Field Trips

Marlboro encourages international field trips and supports efforts to develop them. All international group trips supported by College funds or staffed by College employees are Marlboro-sponsored trips and must be reviewed according to the process outlined below.

Credit for field trips may be awarded only by a regular faculty member or one who holds a continuing appointment, and should depend on the duration of the trip and activities pursued. In no case will a student earn more than 36 credits in one academic year without paying additional tuition. Students who have been enrolled for only one semester of an academic year will be charged additional tuition for any credits in excess of 18.

Trip organizers are encouraged to develop trips that are accessible and affordable to all students. All trips must be self-supporting, paid for with a combination of participant fees and grant funds, where available.

Early in the planning process, trip leaders must prepare a budget in consultation with the Student Accounts office. Following the trip, an expense ledger and receipts must be submitted to the Student Accounts office.

Review Process

Marlboro-sponsored trips that send students to foreign countries go through a review process. The Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students, as appropriate, approves non-curricular components of trips with the assistance of the Committee for Global Engagement. (Trips of 4 days or less may be arranged with the approval of the Dean of Faculty for academic trips or the Dean of Students for non-academic trips. Proposed re-runs of trips that have been approved in the past with the same leaders need not be reviewed by the Committee but may be taken directly to the Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students for approval.)

It is the responsibility of the trip leader to provide the following to the Committee for Global Engagement at least 2 months before departure:

  • A written description of the proposed trip, including dates, itinerary, housing arrangements
  • Maximum and minimum number of students who may participate, and preliminary indication of how many have expressed commitment
  • A description of how participants will be chosen
  • Health and safety risks in the destination
  • Any in-country contacts who will assist the group
  • A preliminary budget, noting sources of funding and cost to students
  • Names of all Marlboro and non-Marlboro staff who will act as leaders.

The Committee for Global Engagement reviews the materials and forwards comments to the trip leader and the Deans within 2 weeks of receiving the proposal. Either Dean may approve the proposal. Approval of a field trip destination does not signify that the College guarantees safe travel. Approval for field trips may be withdrawn should conditions in the destination deteriorate prior to departure.

Pre-Departure Orientation

All international trips must include a pre-departure orientation that includes:

  1. Group health and safety briefing with the Total Health Center (and individual session with each participant to review individual health concerns)
  2. Guidelines for functioning effectively and appropriately in the host culture
  3. State Department travel advisories and information about legal matters in which neither the U.S. government nor the College can intervene
  4. Review of logistics (departure and arrival times, packing list, map, telephone numbers, etc.)
  5. Required documentation (waiver of liability, emergency information, complete itinerary with in-country contacts, photocopies of passports and airline tickets).

The Office of International Services will arrange the orientation in cooperation with the trip leader and will provide all participants with CDC health information and State Department travel advisories for the destination. All participants are required to register with the US Embassy prior to the trip. This can be done on the web at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/. Due to the Privacy Act participants must individually register. The International Office can assist those who need help. Every trip must leave a detailed itinerary with in-country contact phone numbers on file with the Office of International Services (which will distribute copies to the Dean of Faculty, Dean of Students, and receptionist). All participants must be covered by College insurance (or document equivalent coverage), participate in the health and safety orientation prior to departure, and sign a waiver of liability.

In-Country Trip Management

Trip leaders should report regularly (via email or telephone) to the College on the group’s progress. All trips into wilderness and far from medical facilities must include a designated leader with a current First Aid/CPR or First Responder certificate.

Follow-Up

Trip leaders should prepare a report after the trip including suggestions for future trips to the region and in-country contacts who may be helpful. Reports should be filed in the Office of International Services.

Field Trips Within the United States

Faculty intending to lead students on an academic or course-related trip of any length off-campus should consult the Dean of Faculty for guidance. College employees planning non-academic student trips should consult the Dean of Students. Any field trip in which Marlboro students are taken off-campus must be approved by one of the two Deans

Crisis Alert Notification System

When an emergency calls for all-campus notification, the following will take place:

  • The website will be updated with any pertinent information.
  • An e-mail will be sent to all marlboro.edu addresses.
  • The Dining Hall will become the central hub for communication. An “Emergency Board” will be set up with pertinent information and a member of the Senior Staff of the College (or their designee) will be stationed there until the emergency has been resolved.

*611: When you dial *611 during business hours, a call is placed to the Total Health Center, the Director of Plant & Operations, the Dean of Students, the Director of Housing and Residential Life, the Chief Planning and Budget Officer and the College Receptionist. *611 enables you to talk via an open conference call to these individuals so that response to the emergency may begin immediately. If you have already called 911, please inform the individuals on the line that this has occurred.

Critical Injury and/or Death

Step 1

Call 911.

Step 2

If this occurs during Business Hours, call *611. If it’s after hours, weekends or a holiday, page the SLC at 877.730.6051.

Cross-Registration With Marlboro College Graduate School And Continuing Education

A Marlboro student may take up to two Graduate School courses per trimester with the agreement of the student’s Plan sponsor/advisor, Dean of Faculty and the relevant Program Director.

A student wishing to take a Graduate School course for credit should first discuss this option with his/her sponsor or advisor. The advisor and student may consult with the appropriate Program Director as to the level and content of the classes. Students should be aware that space restrictions may apply. The pre-registration form is then signed by the student’s Plan sponsor/advisor and filed in the Registrar’s office before the registration deadline.

While Graduate School course credits may be used as Plan credits, they will not be evaluated in the oral examination and grades received from graduate school faculty will appear on the transcript, that is, progress grades will not be used for any Graduate School courses.

All academic undergraduate policies and deadlines apply to students taking courses at the Graduate School. Marlboro seniors graduating in May are not permitted to take a spring trimester course at the Graduate School. Other students wishing to take a spring course (approximately May – August) must abide by the Marlboro guidelines governing summer academic work.

Decision-making Process

Decisions of the faculty are taken in an official meeting by a majority vote of those present and voting. Fifty percent of active faculty members not on leave constitute a quorum. A motion to dismiss a student must be carried by a majority of those present.

Definitions

The faculty consists of regular and visiting members who are appointed to give instruction for academic credit. The President, the senior Deans, the Library Director, the Director of Admissions, and the Director of Academic Advising are members of the faculty ex officio. Members ex officio may also teach in their areas of academic expertise. Regular members, visiting members, and members ex officio are voting members of the Faculty and are expected to attend both open and closed meetings.

Regular members of the faculty are those appointed to positions expected to remain permanent.

Tenured members of the faculty are those who have been specifically designated as such by the President, after a vote by the Board of Trustees (see also Tenure)

Visiting members of the faculty are those so designated, usually appointed to positions, such as sabbatical replacements, that are not expected to be permanent. Visiting faculty may serve as primary Plan sponsors only after consultation with the Dean of Faculty.

Teaching support staff are those so designated whose occasional teaching responsibilities are described under “Staff-Taught Courses.” Teaching support staff may attend closed faculty meeting when they are offering instruction for credit.

Retired members may continue to serve as primary sponsors in order to complete work with students begun before their retirement. Continued support for Plan work will be offered by retired faculty at the request of the curriculum committee or in consultation with the Dean.

Visiting scholars are qualified academic professionals with a close informal association with the College who are granted guest faculty status without compensation. As associate faculty, they may use College facilities as appropriate. They may also offer an occasional course in the College, with the advice and consent of the Dean of Faculty.

Dental Insurance

A basic dental insurance plan is available after 30 days from date of hire for single, 2-person and families, including domestic partners. The employee pays the full premium at a discounted group rate. Contact human resources for current group rates.

Dining Hall

Meal Schedule

During the academic year the standard meal schedule shall consist of breakfast, lunch and dinner, Monday through Friday. The meal schedule on Saturday and Sunday shall include a “cold” breakfast, and full brunch and dinner. Specific times for meals shall be announced prior to each semester.

Crew

If the Crew Chief(s) choose to assign staff, faculty and students on meal plan to dining hall crew duty, they must inform them in writing at least one week before they are expected to serve. Additional notification measures may be used and are encouraged. (See the Marlboro College Bylaws, Article VI, B.)

Individual Meal Purchases

Students not on the meal plan and guests may purchase individual meals in the dining hall at the current posted rates. (Prices may be subject to change.)

Music During Meals

Live music shall be allowed no more than once a week during the latter half of dinner, provided that the performance is advertised at least two (2) days in advance.

Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans

These student loans are available to those who need assistance to meet the cost of a college education.

Under the provisions of this program, a qualified dependent student may borrow the following maximum annual loan limits:

$ 5,500 Freshmen
$ 6,500 Sophomores
$ 7,500 Juniors and Seniors

Independent students may be eligible for additional unsubsidized Stafford loan.

Additional lifetime aggregate borrowing amounts apply. Contact the Financial Aid office for further information.

Federal Direct Subsidized/Unsubsidized and Plus loans are federal education loans and must be repaid. The loans are charged interest at a rate set yearly be Congress. Origination fees determined by the Department of Education yearly are deducted from the loan before the proceeds are released to the College on the student or parent’s behalf. Interest rates can be found on the Department of Education’s website at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/types/loans/interest-rates. Information on origination fees can be found at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/types/loans/subsidized-unsubsidized#additional-charges.

In order to process the Federal Direct Loan(s), a student borrower needs to complete two form at www.studentloans.gov:

  • Entrance Counseling (Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loan)
  • Master Promissory Note (Subsidized/Unsubsidized Loan)

Directory Information

Although Marlboro College takes precautions to protect students’ privacy, certain information is considered “open to the public.” Marlboro College designates the following categories of student information as public or “Directory Information,” and may disclose such information upon request to members of the College community and outside agencies or individuals.

  • Name
  • Local and permanent address and telephone number
  • Academic status: full-time, half-time, less than half-time
  • E-mail address
  • Dates of attendance
  • Academic class standing (e.g., freshman, sophomore, etc.)
  • Plan of Concentration (major area of study)
  • Expected date of graduation
  • Previous institution(s) attended
  • Degree(s) conferred, including dates and any honors or awards
  • Photographs and digital images

Under the Act, currently enrolled students have the right to request that Directory Information not be disclosed. To withhold disclosure of Directory Information, written notification must be received in the Registrar’s Office by no later than the final date for course registration each semester as published on the Academic Calendar. If notification is not received in the Registrar’s Office by the final published course registration deadline, it will be assumed that all Directory Information may be disclosed for the remainder of the current academic year. The Request to Prevent Disclosure of FERPA Directory Information form is available online or by contacting the Registrar’s Office. Students should consider very carefully the consequences of any decision to withhold Directory Information. Should a student decide to inform the college not to release his or her Directory Information, any future requests during the academic year for such information (including non-institutional persons or organizations as well as friends and relatives) will be refused. Also note that a request to withhold Directory Information made during the academic year in which a student leaves the college (graduates, withdraws, etc.) remains in effect thereafter unless rescinded by the (former) student in writing.

Marlboro College assumes approval for disclosure when students do not specifically request that directory information be withheld by the stated deadline. Questions and concerns about the Privacy Act, directory information or issues of confidentiality should be addressed to the Registrar or the Director of Academic Advising.

 

Disability Services

Marlboro College encourages academically qualified students with disabilities to take advantage of its educational programs. The College is responsible for ensuring that courses, programs, services, jobs, activities and facilities are accessible and usable in the most integrated and appropriate settings. Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 maintain that no qualified individual with disabilities shall, solely on the basis of his or her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity in higher education.

Accommodations

It is the responsibility of the student to make the college aware of a documented disability and the need for accommodation(s). There must be evidence that the disability substantially limits one or more major life activities related to learning. To allow reasonable time for arranging services, the student should provide appropriate documentation of his or her disability to the College as soon as possible (preferably 4 weeks prior to the beginning of classes or the requested accommodation is needed.) Accommodations cannot be retroactive. Reasonable accommodations are provided to ensure that all students have equal access to the educational opportunities at Marlboro College.

Documentation

Documentation of a disability must follow these general guidelines:

  1. Documentation of the disability must be from an appropriate health care provider (e.g., physician, psychologist, psychiatrist).
  2. Documentation materials must be up-to-date (evaluation of disability must have occurred within the last 3 years), on official letterhead, and signed by the health care provider.
  3. Documentation must include the following items:
    • type of disability;
    • functional limitations that arise from the disability;
    • specific statement of the duration of the functional limitations, as well as any distance limitations;
    • suggested recommendations for effective reasonable accommodations in a college setting.

The College reserves the right to judge the appropriateness, timeliness and source of the documentation materials.

Contact

Students requesting accommodations should contact the Coordinator of Disability Services.

Distribution of Awards

Unless otherwise stated on the award letter, all financial aid is disbursed equally over the fall and spring semesters.

Due Dates

FAFSA deadlines:

March 1st for new first-year students
April 1st for returning and transfer students
December 1st for new spring semester applicants

Note: Late applicants may be subject to a reduced award. Returning students, including those students who are anticipating a leave of absence or in absentia study for the following fall semester, who fail to submit financial aid applications by April 1 deadline and are otherwise eligible for Marlboro Grant, may have their Marlboro Grant reduced.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) helps to give a financial picture of each family and provide a national norm for consideration of each student who applies for aid. It should be completed and submitted as soon as possible after October 1. The FAFSA should be completed online at http://www.fafsa.gov. The information on the FAFSA should reflect the information on the appropriate Federal Income Tax Forms.

Eligibility and Calculations

All regular full-time staff members are eligible for paid time off. Staff members working 30 or more hours per week will earn vacation and sick time on a pro-rated basis equal to the ratio of their regularly scheduled hours per week to the full-time equivalent hours. Regular, academic calendar staff members are eligible for vacation and other paid time off pro-rated on the basis of their annual number of months of work. Temporary staff members and part-time staff members scheduled to work less than 30 hours per week are not eligible for paid time off benefits.

Email and Network Account Policy

Students

Currently Enrolled 

Enrolled students are granted an @marlboro.edu email address. This email address is used for official college communications and students are responsible for checking it regularly; directions on how to forward email addressed to that account to another can be found under the Email Forwarding Tutorial.

Temporary Leave

Students on temporary leave maintain their @marlboro.edu email address as if they were a current student.

Non-Matriculated

Students enrolled in one more courses at Marlboro but not working toward a degree can request to have a network account, granting them access to library and learning resources, wireless internet access on campus, and email. However, such accounts will immediately be disabled, without notice, once the term in which they are enrolled ends.

Withdrawn

When a student’s academic status becomes “Withdrawn” according to the Office of the Registrar, his/her account will be disabled. Under normal circumstances, the IT department will immediately disable access to community services (e.g. Nook and Courses), notify the account user via email of the impeding changes, and allow at least a month of continued access to email and file storage (so the account user can move things off of Marlboro’s network). All email and files will then be deleted off the server.

Discontinued

When a student’s academic status becomes “Plan Discontinuance” or “English Discontinuance,” the same procedure will be followed as Withdrawn. However, account users will usually be granted 1 academic term of continued email and file storage use before the account is completely disabled.

Alumni

Graduates of the undergraduate college are granted their @marlboro.edu addresses for life, though they do not have space on a server for file storage. After Commencement, the IT department will allow at least a month for graduates to move their non-email files off of Marlboro’s network.

Faculty

Faculty email and file storage accounts are granted to all faculty, including adjuncts, temporary replacements, and fellows. All such accounts will be disabled immediately upon termination of employment (excluding emeriti faculty).

Staff

Staff accounts have different username than student accounts. Meaning, if a student becomes a staff or vice versa they need a new account. Staff are granted an account only while they are employed. They will loose access to those accounts immediately upon termination of employment. Staff are eligible for IT services until their last day of employment. Following the last day of employment, the individuals account and data will be permanently removed. If an email account was used for business purposes, the departing staff member should inform the IT department how their email should be redirected after their departure. If a departing staff member is also an alum of the college, please inform the IT department. The account will be moved to alumni status instead of being removed.

Leaving the College

After any individual exits the College their username will not be reassigned to a different person. It is important that each username remain mapped to one individual because vendors may provision access to their systems and store sensitive information based on this identifier. For example, when Jane Doe accesses the third party online billing system her information could be stored based on her username, jdoe. If we allowed for the reuse of Jane’s username, then eventually another individual might log in to the same payment portal and see her information, which could constitute a breach of security and/or privacy.

Backups

The college takes a once-daily snapshot of user account data to protect against the result of hardware failure. These backups are not maintained for archiving purposes, may exclude emails and files created and deleted between backup snapshots, and are deleted after 21 days. (This policy excludes administrative server data, such as financial and registrar records, and files on administrative servers, which are retained as long as the backup medium remains readable.)

Exceptions to the above policies may be granted only by the college administration or where described in the Acceptable Use Policy.

Emergency Volunteer Time

There are many emergency volunteer opportunities, and Marlboro encourages your participation. You will be paid up to 15 volunteer hours per year if absent from work to respond to an emergency as a member of an emergency rescue unit such as the Red Cross, a volunteer fire department or any other first response emergency service. You must notify your supervisor and the human resources office upon hire or upon making a commitment to an emergency first response unit, and you may be required to submit evidence in order to qualify for this type of paid time off. Emergency first responders receive 15 hours on their date of hire and on each anniversary date thereafter. Emergency volunteer time does not accrue; unused emergency volunteer time from the previous year expires on each anniversary date. Unused emergency volunteer time is not paid when a staff member’s employment with Marlboro College ends. To assist in department workflow, volunteers should consult with supervisors and arrange for off-hours response time if feasible.

Emeritus Status

Emeritus status is granted by the President and Board of Trustees on the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty in recognition of distinguished service to the College.

  1. Emeritus Faculty may enroll in any of the regular or supplemental health insurance plans offered by the Emeriti program subject to the terms defined by the Emeriti Consortium*
  2. Emeritus Faculty can retain their Marlboro email accounts and receive limited technical support for those accounts
  3. Emeritus Faculty will have access to the library and limited access to library services such as interlibrary loan.
  4. Emeritus Faculty will have access to the computer lab in the library and limited use of the Mather photocopy machines.
  5. Emeritus Faculty can continue to offer an occasional course when such an arrangement is mutually agreed upon by the retiree, the Curriculum Committee and the Dean of Faculty.
  6. Emeritus Faculty are eligible for the college’s tuition exchange program for dependent children.
  7. Emeritus Faculty can take classes at the undergraduate college free of charge.
  8. Emeritus Faculty will have access to a shared office space (if available) at the Marlboro College Graduate Center during regular business hours.

Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

The employee assistance program from EAP Network is a voluntary program available to you as a College employee. It is designed to allow you or your family members to seek confidential, professional counseling or assistance for help in resolving life problems, including marital problems, adolescence issues, drug and alcohol issues, elder care needs and financial or legal consulting. EAP Network will provide one to five sessions at no cost to you or your family members. Using the EAP program will not, in anyway, jeopardize your job security or promotional opportunities. It is a resource to offer anonymous assistance in resolving problems, which might otherwise have a detrimental effect on your job performance. The request for help may be initiated by any employee or family member by calling EAP Network at 800-333-6624, available 24 hours a day. Marlboro College does not learn of individual employees utilizing the service; however, the College does receive statistical information on the overall usage.

Employment At Will Relationship

Your relationship with the College is “at will,” the most common form of employment relationship. As a Marlboro employee, you enter into employment voluntarily and are free to resign at any time for any reason or no reason. Similarly, Marlboro College is free to end its relationship with any employee at any time for any reason or no reason except for reasons protected by law.

Enrollment/Registration

College registration or enrollment and final course selection are essential processes for establishing status as a student at Marlboro College.

All new and returning students are expected to register at the College on the date and time specified in the academic calendar. The Director of Housing and Residential Life Office issues photo IDs, and the Plant and Operations Office issues automobile registration and room keys. The Total Health Center will copy the student primary insurance information and issue a secondary insurance identification card.

On Registration/Enrollment Day or within 48 hours of arrival on campus, every student who brings a motor-propelled vehicle to College must register this vehicle with the Plant and Operations Office on the form provided at enrollment.

Denial of Enrollment: The College reserves the right to deny enrollment to students who have not fulfilled their financial or other obligations to the College. Enrollment will also be denied to any international student without an appropriate student visa.

Students who have not satisfactorily enrolled by the final course registration date will not be allowed to attend courses, tutorials or other academic college related activities for the semester, or to earn credit for the semester.

Students are expected to consult with their academic advisors and formulate a plan of study within the first few days of the term. Complete course information must be submitted online as part of the course registration system, and must also be approved by the academic advisor. The submission must occur no later than the published date for final course registration at the beginning of each semester. Failure to submit the form to the Registrar may result in a student being withdrawn from the College. Certification as a student at Marlboro College occurs only after course registration has been approved by the Registrar’s Office.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Marlboro College is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We seek to be fully compliant with all related laws. Marlboro College will not discriminate against employees or applicants based on their race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, ancestry, place of birth, age, disability or gender identity and its expression, marital status, HIV status or any other protected classification.

Errors and Corrections

Marlboro College makes every reasonable effort to insure that you are paid in an accurate and timely manner. Unfortunately, errors may sometimes occur. You are responsible for reviewing your paystub upon receipt for accuracy. If an error in your paycheck has occurred, you are expected to notify payroll to ensure a timely resolution of the errors.

Any employee who believes that Marlboro College has made an inappropriate deduction or has failed to make proper payment regarding wages or benefits shall immediately consult the payroll office. The payroll office will initiate an investigation of the possible error within two business days of notification, and within 15 business days shall determine whether an error has occurred and report the findings to the employee. If the employee disagrees with the determination of the payroll office, he/she may file a written complaint with the senior financial management officer. Within 15 business days of receiving the complaint, the chief financial officer will make a determination as to whether the payment or deductions were appropriate and provide the employee with a written response.

In the event of an inappropriate deduction or other error resulting in underpayment to the employee, the employee will be reimbursed for the full amount of the error less deductions by the next payday.

In the event of an error resulting in an overpayment to the employee, the employee will need to arrange to reimburse the College in full on or before the next payday. If reimbursement causes a hardship to the employee, the employee may make a written request to reimburse the College through subsequent payroll deduction(s). The decision to allow subsequent reimbursement will be made at the sole discretion of the senior financial management officer and is not subject to appeal.

Evacuation Policy

Each semester the OAS will maintain a confidential list of student with mobility disabilities who may need assistance with evacuation. The list contains student’s names and their room assignments. This list will be shared with the Marlboro Fire Department, the on campus fire chief, the Student Life Coordinators, and the Resident Assistant, so that in the event of a fire they can assist with evacuation.

Faculty Committees

The faculty has established several standing committees and from time to time may establish others, either as standing committees or ad hoc committees. Though some faculty committees (notably the Committee on Faculty, the Admissions Committee, and the English Committee) do much of their work in carrying out policy established by the faculty, most committees prepare policy recommendations for discussion and action by the faculty; policy is established only by action by the faculty as a committee of the whole. At least once a year, each committee of the faculty should consider matters of long-term interest related to its function and report informally to the faculty. Committees customarily arrive at decisions by consensus, but may take a formal vote when necessary.

Where no chairman is specified ex officio, a committee may act without a chair, may elect a chair, or may have the Dean appoint a chair. Except for the few committees for which the faculty has established elections, committee assignments are made by the Dean of Faculty, taking into consideration the interests and talents of faculty members, the needs of various committees, and an equitable distribution of committee work from year to year. Faculty members who wish to serve on a specific committee are encouraged to request assignment; someone with an unusually heavy teaching load may request a light assignment. Each policy-shaping committee of the faculty also has members chosen by Town Meeting.

The Admissions Committee consists of the Director of Admissions, three other members of the faculty, and three student members elected by Town Meeting. Two additional members of the admissions staff, designated by the Director of Admissions, also meet with the committee. The committee is responsible for admissions decisions for all new applicants to the College (in practice, it delegates to admissions staff decisions where candidates obviously meet admissions criteria, but it may review any decision); for assisting and advising the Director of Admissions in administering the Admissions Program; and for proposing any changes in admissions procedures or standards to the full faculty. The faculty members of the committee are responsible for awarding merit scholarships and certain grants.

  • The Financial Aid Subcommittee consists of the Director of Financial Aid and the members of the Admissions Committee. It is responsible for the application of financial aid policy and for recommending policy changes to the faculty. The Board of Trustees reserves final authority for policy changes with significant financial implications for the College.

The Committee on Academic Integrity consists of the Dean of the Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, two students elected by Town Meeting, and two members of the Faculty appointed annually by the Dean of the Faculty. The Committee considers regulations of academic policy and issues of academic integrity and makes recommendations to the Faculty either directly or through another committee. In particular, the Committee, together with affected faculty, investigates suspected plagiarism, making a determination as to scale and intent to deceive, with recommendations to the Faculty for action.

The Committee on Academic Prizes and Scholarships consists of four members of the faculty, one from each area of the curriculum. It is responsible for gathering and coordinating information on eligibility for academic scholarships, for making recommendations to the faculty for the award of such scholarships, and for gathering the information on the award of prizes in specific areas from the faculty who decide them.

The Committee on Faculty consists of the Dean of Faculty, who serves as chair ex officio; three faculty members, with one or two elected in alternating years for two-year terms, including at least one tenured member; and two student members, elected by Town Meeting. Its primary functions are to conduct searches for new faculty, to conduct regular and special reviews of members of the faculty, excluding ex officio members except for their teaching when they choose to offer classes, and to make recommendations to the President concerning appointments to the faculty. From time to time, it may also review and propose to the faculty changes to the procedures governing its actions or pertaining to the professional rights and responsibilities of faculty members.

Duties of the committee:

  1. Faculty Reviews
  • The committee shall conduct regular reviews of the faculty members on the schedule and using the procedures outlined in the Handbook.
  • It may conduct special reviews of faculty, as appropriate. Special reviews may focus on narrow issues or any or all of the criteria outlined in the Handbook, at the discretion of the committee. Special reviews may be initiated by the committee in response to allegations of unprofessional conduct in the course of professional duties (see in particular the previous sections on Professional Ethics and Limits of Relationships with Students) or by an accumulation of negative evaluations or complaints from students or colleagues.
  • Faculty members are entitled to meet with the committee to discuss issues of significant concern regarding their performance of professional duties whether they are currently under review or not. A request for such a meeting should go to the Dean of the Faculty for scheduling; every effort should be made to provide the meeting within two weeks.

2. Faculty Hiring

  • It shall carry out searches for new faculty members using procedures outlined in the Handbook.
  • When hiring for regular appointments, the Committee on Faculty shall decide which other faculty will join the search committee. The Dean of Faculty, or the Dean’s designee, will chair the search committee.
  • When hiring for non-regular appointments, especially for sabbatical and single course replacements, the committee may delegate hiring responsibility to faculty in the area. For full-time appointments, at least one Committee on Faculty member should be a member of the search committee.

The Committee on Finances consists of three members of the faculty, with one elected each year for a three-year term. It consults with the President and the Board of Trustees on the finances of the College, with an emphasis on matters relating to faculty salaries and benefits; it determines faculty opinion concerning College finances, represents those opinions wherever it may be appropriate, and reports back to the faculty on the results of such efforts; and it may propose action to the faculty in appropriate areas.

The Committee on the First Two Years consists of the Dean of Students, Director of Academic Advising, three faculty members appointed annually by the Dean of Faculty, three students elected annually by Town Meeting and based on the charge, representatives from Admissions, Academic Support, Residential Life and the Registrar will be invited to participate. The Committee is charged with supporting student learning both in and outside the classroom. Concerns specific to the Committee include, but are not limited to, academic advising, retention, orientation, residential life, transition to Plan.

The Committee on Lectures, Concerts, and Exhibits consists of four members of the faculty, two students elected by Town Meeting, the Director of Development, the Director of Housing & Residential Life of Academic Affairs, and the Public Relations Coordinator. The Committee is responsible for organizing public lectures, concerts and exhibits, for administering the funds in support of such activities, included but not limited to special gifts and endowments; and for coordinating with the Lyceum Committee of Town Meeting. It may apply for grants in support of its activities to supplement the College budget.

The Curriculum Committee consists of (1) the Dean of Faculty, who serves as chair; (2) four other faculty members, one from each of the four areas of the curriculum, who are nominated by their area and elected by the faculty to two-year staggered terms, such that two terms expire each year; at least two nominations must be put forth for each vacancy; and (3) three students, elected by Town Meeting. The Registrar and the Director of Academic Advising meet with the Committee to advise and consult on matters of academic regulations. The Committee considers a broad range of questions pertaining to the curriculum: proposed changes in course offerings; the need or advisability of adding new positions to the faculty or of allocating positions differently; the definition and description of open regular positions; changes in academic regulations; curricular issues referred to it from the whole faculty or raised by faculty or students or the Registrar; and so on. Although it may informally advise the Dean of Faculty and the Registrar, it takes formal action only by proposing matters to the Faculty Meeting. The minutes of the Committee will be circulated regularly to the community.

The Library Committee consists of the Librarian, who chairs the committee ex officio; two other members of the faculty appointed by the Dean; and one student elected by Town Meeting.

The Academic Computing Committee consists of the computer science faculty member, who chairs the committee ex officio, and two other members of the faculty selected from the faculty members of the Curriculum Committee. The committee considers matters relating to the acquisition, allocation, and use of computing resources.

The Dean’s Advisory Committee consists of the Dean of Students, who generally chairs the committee; three other members of the faculty; and three students elected by Town Meeting. Dean’s office staff sit with the committee at the Dean’s discretion. The committee advises the Dean on student business and on the application of College and Town Meeting regulations; it may propose changes in regulations to the faculty, to Town Meeting, and to the administration.

The English Committee consists of the writing instructors and four other members of the faculty, one from each area of the curriculum. Its primary functions are to read and evaluate the writing of students who have not yet passed the Clear Writing Requirement; to recommend action to the faculty or the Dean of Faculty concerning those students; and occasionally to consider changes to the regulations covering the Clear Writing Requirement.

The Trustee Delegates are two members of the faculty elected to staggered two-year terms. They attend meetings of the Board of Trustees, and of Trustee committees as appropriate, as non-voting representatives of the faculty. They are responsible for reporting to the trustees on matters of faculty concern and for reporting to the faculty on trustee discussions and actions.

The Language Committee consists of two of the faculty members teaching language, (with each faculty member serving a two-year term every three years), one faculty representative of the Committee for Global Engagement, two students elected by Town Meeting, and a staff member representing I.T. The committee will consult regularly with other faculty and staff who teach and/or support the teaching of languages at Marlboro such as the Classics and Arabic Fellows. The Language Committee’s chief responsibility is to manage, encourage and communicate the language study offerings, opportunities, and initiatives of the College. This includes especially the coordination of student requests for, and available College support for, Less Commonly Taught Languages. The Language Committee awards Marlboro College Summer Language Study Grants.

The Committee for Global Engagement consists of four faculty members (one from each area of the curriculum) appointed by the Dean, two students (one WSP and one non-WSP) elected by Town Meeting, the Director of World Studies and the Director of International Services. The World Studies Director chairs the committee. The Committee for Global Engagement considers a broad range of policies governing international and intercultural study opportunities and initiatives that foster global perspectives across the curriculum. The committee works to ensure community-wide discussion on international programs, serves as an advocate for internationalization of the curriculum, and provides guidance on international academic programs. Policy or program changes are brought to the Curriculum Committee for advice and to the faculty for formal approval. The committee works with the international administrative staff on implementation of policy.

The Institutional Review Board (IRB) consists of the Assistant Dean for Academic Records and Institutional Research, four faculty (one from each area) and one community member, not otherwise affiliated with the institution, appointed by the Dean of Faculty, in compliance with FDA regulations regarding Institutional Review Boards (45 CFR 46.107). The IRB reviews all faculty, staff and student research involving human and non-human animal subjects. For research projects involving animal subjects the Dean of Faculty appoints an additional member (a veterinarian) from outside the College community. The IRB is also responsible for holding annual workshops on research and updating College materials on research policies and procedures.

Faculty Review

Principles of Faculty Review

Criteria for Faculty Evaluation

Procedures for Faculty Review

 

Procedure for Appeal and Review of Decision Not to Renew Contracts of Not to Award Tenure

 

 Principles of Faculty Review

Marlboro’s success depends on cultivating in its faculty excellent teaching and advising, a commitment to the College’s mission, engagement in its governance, and continuing professional development. The periodic review of faculty serves both to measure and enhance these practices and qualities. Faculty under review prepare dossiers which require extensive self-reflection. The Committee on Faculty uses these dossiers, together with student and peer evaluations, to assess faculty members’ performance, celebrate successes, and highlight areas in need of improvement. The Committee, through the office of the Dean of Faculty, will provide coaching and professional development to foster improvement in areas of weakness. Through assessment and support, the review process seeks to strengthen the work of faculty granted on-going appointments. It also serves to identify cases when, despite this support, a faculty member is not suited to continued appointment.

 Criteria for Faculty Evaluation

The Faculty has adopted the following criteria for the evaluation of performance, with special attention to those practices expected from all members of the faculty regardless of tenure or years of service. The criteria described below are intended to provide some consistency to faculty work while also acknowledging and respecting pedagogical and disciplinary differences in individual faculty practices. It is the goal of the Committee on Faculty to offer clear feedback while also providing fair and equitable evaluations of each faculty member.

1. Teaching

Marlboro College is primarily a teaching institution. Therefore, not only is the quality of teaching the most important criterion in evaluating faculty, but demonstrated excellence in this area is necessary for continuing appointments.

Given Marlboro’s curricular model, Faculty are expected to work closely with students from the first-year through graduation, developing courses that are developmentally appropriate for students’ progress through the curriculum.

Faculty should recognize that students come from a variety of backgrounds and bring with them a wide array of experiences and abilities. Faculty should also understand that students have different needs as they progress through their Marlboro education. Excellent teaching requires that faculty be flexible in their classes, tutorials, and on Plan to address a diverse range of students. Excellent teachers recognize their students’ current abilities and provide strategies for their continued development and success.

Faculty are expected to provide opportunities for feedback in their courses throughout the semester and will build the necessary scaffolding for the development of skills and knowledge in their classes and throughout their curriculum. Faculty are also expected to provide students on Plan with tutorial support and guidance throughout the Plan process.

Practices of an excellent teacher include:

  • Courses and tutorials that demonstrate thinking and discovery as well as content, the fostering of self-directed learning, and written, oral, and other forms of communication.
  • A curriculum that includes how individual courses represent a progression through a particular field/fields of study while supporting students in developing skills central to the mission of the College.
  • Grading and evaluation practices with appropriate standards and expectations for student work, including clear criteria for evaluation for different course levels, tutorials, and Plan work.
  • An awareness of different learning styles in the preparation of course materials and assignments.
  • Classroom practices that teach students how to plan and execute projects in preparation for Plan, require students to engage collaboratively, and provide support for writing.

2. Advising

The faculty advisor plays a vital role in the intellectual growth of Marlboro students. The advisor is not only an experienced guide to the curriculum and the institution but is active in helping students set educational and career goals and work toward meeting them. While the advisor is expected to introduce, inform, and offer advice, the most critical part of the advisor’s role is to listen, discuss, challenge, assist, collaborate, and model activities that are a natural extension of teaching and support Marlboro’s mission.

Practices of an excellent advisor include:

  • Demonstrated commitment to the liberal arts and to the goal of studying broadly as an important preparation for life-long learning, engaged citizenship, and meaningful work.
  • An established Dedicated Hour that meets regularly to provide support and guidance for all advisees and Plan students.
  • Accessibility outside of Dedicated Hour to meet individually with students.
  • An approach to advising that recognizes that different students have different needs and that the advisor’s role is to support all students towards the completion of their degree.
  • A familiarity with the curriculum as a whole, the operations of community governance, the support services available to students, and the varied opportunities for students, including grants, internships, and scholarships.
  • An understanding of the arc of the curriculum and how it provides structured advising opportunities to support student learning across the four years.

3. Service and College Governance

As an intentionally small learning community committed to collaboration and civic engagement, Marlboro College depends on faculty members taking an active part in governance and committee work, both to support the working of the College and as models for student learning. It also requires faculty to be responsible, collegial, and engaged when interacting with students, staff, and other faculty.

Marlboro expects all faculty to serve the College’s mission in the following ways:Expressing one’s own ideas with courage and listening respectfully to the others.

  • Meeting administrative deadlines, particularly those established by the registrar for grades, course requests, and book orders.
  • Participating in functions that support the College, especially events supporting Admissions and Development.
  • Supporting students and colleagues by attending campus events.
  • Representing the College to the wider community, both through College-sponsored functions and through other forms of community engagement and service.
  • Being active and well-informed participants in Faculty and Town Meetings.
  • Serving actively on faculty committees, both elected and appointed.
  • Contributing to faculty reviews and hiring processes.
  • Assisting in periodic reviews and assessment of College programs and curricula.
  • Supporting Town Meeting through active engagement in Selectboard, committees, and Community Court.

4. Professional Development, Scholarship, and Creative Work

As an institution of higher learning, Marlboro College has a responsibility to contribute to the creative and intellectual life of our society. Marlboro faculty are expected to remain professionally involved in the creative and scholarly work of their discipline. Faculty should promote the exchange of ideas and acquisition of knowledge that enriches their teaching and contributes to the advancement of learning in the profession at large. Professional engagement provides important context for curriculum and course development, models lifelong learning for students, creates opportunities for students through faculty connections, and contributes to the visibility of the College.

Examples of professional development include:

  • Active and effective participation in one’s field, through individual or collaborative publications, exhibitions, or performances.
  • Research on the scholarship of teaching and learning.
  • Active participation in scholarly or artistic discourse, through the
    presentation of invited lectures, conference papers or posters; or through other active scholarly involvement in conferences or public programming; or through the receipt of grants.
  • Active work with students on artistic, scholarly, or research projects that
    go beyond regular courses or tutorials.
  • Administration and management of professional organizations and institutions.
  • Board membership or consulting, where participation reflects the candidate’s standing as an expert in the field.
  • Acquisition of new skills or the pursuit of secondary fields of scholarly
    interest, including learning a new language or other research tool, attending a workshop or conference in support of a new line of scholarly inquiry, and gaining training and experience to prepare and teach courses in support of college-wide priorities.

 Procedures for Faculty Review

The Committee on Faculty has adopted the following procedural guidelines, in keeping with the regulations of the faculty and with the goal of maintaining fairness.

  1. Faculty to be reviewed will be notified the semester prior to which the evaluation is to take place and will receive a copy of these procedures, directing attention to this section of the Handbook.
  2. Faculty to be reviewed will be provided with data from the Registrar’s office about course and tutorial enrollment, data on Plan Students, course and advising evaluations, and review file letters by the first week of the term in which a faculty member is reviewed. In the semester prior to the review, the Committee on Faculty will offer to have a faculty member sit in on a class and write up their observations to be included in the review file.
  3. Faculty under review shall submit supporting material, including:
    • Current Curriculum Vitae
    • Evidence of professional work
    • Evidence of community service or activities outside of the College
    • Syllabi of courses and tutorials
    • Publications, exhibitions, and the names of colleagues at peer institutions or professional organizations who might contribute to the evaluation
    • A Self Reflection that reflects on advising, teaching, service, and scholarship since the faculty member’s last review. In this Reflection, the faculty member should specifically address the comments and broad themes from teaching and advising evaluations, and how the faculty member has responded to issues raised in those evaluations. The Self Reflection should also address the broad themes from the Review Questionnaires and how the faculty member will address these themes going forward. If there are recurring concerns or comments in either teaching and advising evaluations or the faculty questionnaires, the Self Reflection is a place to discuss them. The advising section of the Self Reflection should specifically address work with Plan students. The Self Reflection may discuss how courses and tutorials fit into a curriculum, and should also reflect on curriculum more broadly.
  4. One week before the review, the Committee on Faculty will provide the faculty under review with a letter summarizing the feedback of the Committee, based on the review file, setting the agenda for the discussion during the review.
  5. When conducting reviews, the committee should solicit opinions from all constituencies and may solicit opinions on curricular issues from the Curriculum Committee and on other issues it deems important from community and non-community members, as appropriate. In particular, opinions should be solicited from colleagues and students who work closely with the faculty member in classes, committees, or curricular areas. Committee members should submit their own evaluations of the person under review prior to the review so that they are free to act as representatives of the faculty in conducting an evaluation that takes into account all of the information available to the Committee.
  6. The Committee assumes that most observations from the community pertinent to a review will be expressed via the Review Questionnaire. Community members who wish to raise concerns confidentially may do so via a letter to the Committee on Faculty. Such letters must be received by the end of the first week of the semester in which the review is to occur. The Committee will meet with the community member who has submitted the letter to determine (a) whether the concerns raised are pertinent to the Review, and (b) how these concerns should be raised with the faculty member under review. If the Committee determines that the concerns are pertinent to the review, the Committee will draft a letter for the review file communicating the concerns to the faculty member. The Committee will confer with the community member raising the concerns prior to placing the letter in the review file.
  7. The Dean of Faculty, the Registrar, the Dean of Admissions, and the Bookstore Manager will be invited to comment on the faculty member’s fulfillment of his or her professional responsibilities as outlined in the Professional Responsibilities section.
  8. Based on the material in the review file, the Committee will conduct an interview with the faculty member. This interview will normally begin with an opportunity for the faculty member to expand on the Self Reflection, and address the questions provided by the Committee in advance. The Committee will discuss with the faculty member all aspects of his or her work at the College and will share with the faculty member its sense of both strengths and weaknesses.
  9. Based on the materials in the review file and the interview with the faculty member, the Committee will draft a letter summarizing its findings and making a recommendation to the President, as appropriate. Such letters should not comment on matters that have not been raised during the interview with the faculty member under review. The committee shall report its findings to the President, with or without recommendation, and to the person under review.
  10. The President of the College will write to the faculty member announcing his or her decision.
  11. The Dean of Faculty is available for consultation with each faculty member to be reviewed to discuss the procedures and to determine any special arrangements that need to be made to ensure a fair and complete review of that faculty member’s work.

 Procedure for Appeal and Review of Decision Not to Renew Contracts or Not to Award Tenure*

1. Procedure for Teaching Faculty

Members of the teaching faculty have the right to appeal a decision not to renew their contract or to award tenure. Faculty have this right whether the President has accepted a recommendation from the Committee on Faculty or has failed to accept such a recommendation.

In cases of decisions not to award contract prior to tenure or pre-tenure, the President or Committee on Faculty will provide reasons in writing. It must also be kept in mind, however, that a faculty member’s teaching time before award of tenure is probationary, that the institution must be accorded the widest latitude consistent with academic freedom and standards of fairness in establishing criteria and reaching a decision, and that in any appeal the burden of proof rests with the faculty member. This is consistent with 1971 AAUP Statement on Procedural Standards in the Renewal or Non-Renewal of Faculty Appointments.

(1) To appeal a decision not to renew or award tenure, faculty members must indicate in writing to the President that they wish to appeal within 30 calendar days from the beginning of the semester (first class day) following notification of a decision.

(2) Upon appeal, the President, the Dean of Faculty, and the faculty member will select an Appeal Committee consisting of three members of the regular teaching faculty acceptable to all three parties.

(3) Before beginning their work, the Appeal Committee will attend a session on appropriate policy and procedures by the College’s designated human resources professional or legal counsel.

(4) All relevant material will be submitted to the Appeal Committee in writing. Such materials must be submitted within 60 days of the beginning of the semester following notification of a decision. The written materials will include at least the following:

(a) A copy of the reasons for the negative decision received by the faculty member and any supporting documents the Committee on Faculty or the administration may choose to provide;

(b) An appeal document detailing the grounds for an appeal and any supporting documents the faculty member may wish to provide.

(5) The grounds for an appeal are (1) that the process of evaluation and/or decision making, as stated in the Handbook, was violated, (2) that the faculty member’s academic freedom has been violated, as defined by the appropriate AAUP statement, or (3) unlawful discrimination. The faculty member may not ground an appeal in disagreements over the judgments of the Committee on Faculty or President if those judgments were themselves the product of correct procedure. The College retains the right to make judgments about the quality of candidates’ performance in accord with the process specified in the Handbook; good performance is not in itself a guarantee of renewal or tenure. If, however, a faculty members believes that an incorrect judgment about the quality or nature of their work has been arrived at because of faults in process, violation of academic freedom, or unlawful discrimination, they must show how such violations resulted in an improper judgment about performance.

(6) The Appeal Committee will review the decision broadly for fairness of process and conformity with Handbook guidelines. The Appeal Committee is charged with determining whether a faculty member should have their case reconsidered and, if so, under what conditions. It is not the role of the appeal committee to render an independent judgment on the merits of any candidates’ qualifications for tenure or renewal. The Appeal Committee must be given full access to all persons and documents that will help it reach a sound conclusion, including the faculty member’s appeal document, attachments (if any) and the faculty member’s file, should the Appeal Committee wish to see it.

(7) The Appeal Committee can recommend any of the following:

(a) The appeal is not sustained and no further College action is recommended;

(b) The decision-making process ought to be repeated because of a violation of process, academic freedom, or unlawful discrimination as specified in #5 above. In this case the Appeal Committee may recommend that the Committee on Faculty reconsider the faculty member’s case for tenure or renewal.

The Appeal Committee should specify to the Committee on Faculty the ways in which its new process should differ from its prior consideration of the faculty member’s case.

The Appeal Committee will communicate its findings to the faculty member and President in writing.

The Committee on Faculty must reconsider the faculty member’s file in conformity with the recommendations of the Appeal Committee and produce a second recommendation. Whether the new recommendation concurs or differs from the previous recommendation, it supersedes the previous recommendation and becomes the recommendation that the President must use in forming a recommendation to the Board.

(8) The official record of the Appeal Committee will be kept in the President’s Office files and will consist of the following:

(a) All written materials received from the administration, the faculty member, and other parties seen to be appropriate by the Committee;

(b) A copy of the committee’s recommendation;

(c) A log of the Committee’s actions, including times of meeting, documents received, and a record of parties with whom the Committee or its members conversed.

2. Procedure for Appeal and Review of Decision Not to Renew Contracts for Teaching Staff

Members of the teaching staff have the right to appeal a decision not to renew their contract. In cases of decisions not to award contract renewal, the supervisor will provide notice in writing to the faculty member by April 1st.

(1) To appeal a decision not to renew, faculty members must indicate in writing to the President that they wish to appeal within 30 calendar days of the notification of non-renewal.

(2) The grounds for an appeal are that the process of evaluation and/or decision-making, as stated in the handbook, was violated. The teaching staff member may not ground an appeal on disagreements over the supervisor’s judgments if those judgments were themselves the product of correct procedure. The College retains the right to make judgments about the quality of a staff member’s performance in accord with the process specified in the Handbook; good performance is not in itself a guarantee of renewal. If, however, the teaching staff member believes that an incorrect judgment about the quality or nature of their work has been arrived at because of faults in the process, they must show how flaws in the process led to such an improper judgment about performance.

(3) The President shall review the decision broadly for fairness of process and conformity with Handbook guidelines. The President is charged with determining whether teaching staff members should have their case reconsidered and, if so, under what conditions. The President will inform the teaching staff member of the decision. An official record of the appeal and response shall be kept in the President’s office.

*Policy and procedures adapted from Earlham College

Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

All regular employees who have worked for Marlboro College for at least 12 months and at least 1,250 hours during the previous 12 months you are eligible for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave within a calendar year. This is in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) and the Vermont Parental and Family Leave Law of 1992 or other changes in the law. This leave will be granted:

  • For the birth of a son or daughter and to care for the newborn child (leave for this purpose must conclude within 12 months after the birth);
  • For the placement of a child for adoption or foster care with an employee and to care for the newly placed child (leave for this purpose must conclude within 12 months after the placement);
  • To care for an immediate family member (spouse, child or parent) with a serious health condition as defined below; and
  • When the employee is unable to work because of a serious health condition as defined below.
  • “Any qualifying exigency” arising out of the fact that the spouse, son, daughter or parent of the employee is on active duty or has been notified of an impending call to active duty status, in support of a contingency operation. By the terms of the statute, this provision requires the Secretary of Labor to issue regulations defining “any qualifying exigency.” In the interim, employers are encouraged to provide this type of leave to qualifying employees.

A serious health condition is an illness, injury, impairment or physical or mental condition that involves:

  • Any period of incapacity or treatment connected with inpatient care (i.e., an overnight stay) in a hospital, hospice or residential medical care facility; or
  • A period of incapacity requiring absence of more than three calendar days from work that also involves continuing treatment by (or under the supervision of) a qualifying health care provider; or
  • Any period of incapacity due to pregnancy or for prenatal care; or
  • Any period of incapacity (or treatment therefore) due to a chronic serious health condition (e.g., asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, etc.); or
  • Any absence to receive multiple treatments (including any period of recovery there from) by, or on referral by, a qualifying health care provider for a condition that likely would result in incapacity of more than three consecutive days if left untreated (e.g., chemotherapy, physical therapy, dialysis, etc.).
  • Military Service: An eligible employee who is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin of a covered service member who is recovering from a serious illness or injury sustained in the line of duty on active duty is entitled to up to 26 weeks of leave in a single 12-month period to care for the service member. This military-caregiver leave is available during “a single 12-month period” during which an eligible employee is entitled to a combined total of 26 weeks of all types of FMLA leave.

Staff members may elect (but are not required) to use up all available paid time off while on leave. Use of paid leave does not extend the overall leave time to which the staff member is entitled. See below for information specific to maternity, paternity or adoption leaves.

During the Vermont and FMLA leave period, Marlboro College will maintain the employee’s health insurance at the regular employee cost. The College reserves the right to seek recovery of health insurance premium payments in the event an employee fails to return to work at the end of the leave. Arrangements for payment of the employee contributions must be made in advance with the senior financial management officer. The College will also maintain and pay for long-term disability income insurance and group term life insurance during the leave period. Marlboro College will require some form of certification necessitating the leave. The College reserves the right to recertification every 30 days.

Federal PELL Grants

Based on information submitted on the FAFSA, the federal government awards grants to eligible students in accordance with the entitlement program enacted by Congress in 1972. This federal grant is awarded to students who meet the required financial need criteria. The federal government determines eligibility and award amounts. The grant is disbursed in each term during the academic year in which the student is eligible. Grants are considered “gift aid” and do not have to be paid back. Pell Lifetime Eligibility Used - The amount of Federal Pell Grant funds a student may receive over his/her lifetime is limited by a federal law to be the equivalent of six years. Using the maximum amount of Pell Grant you can receive each year as 100%, six years is equivalent to 600%.

Federal PLUS Loan

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) are not need-based. Any U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen whose dependent son or daughter is enrolled at least half-time is eligible to apply for a loan equal to the cost of attendance minus other financial aid for which the student is eligible. Federal PLUS loans are not subsidized and repayment of the loan or interest only may begin as soon as the loans are disbursed or may be deferred until the student separates from the College or has dropped below 6 credits. Examples of separation are graduation, leave of absence and withdrawal. It is the responsibility of the parent to complete the application and Master Promissory Note at www.studentloans.gov. Marlboro College cannot apply on your behalf.

Financial Aid Programs Federal Work-Study

Students with financial need may be eligible for employment through the Federal Work-Study Program and additional institutional funding. A listing of positions is compiled by the Student Employment Coordinator and posted on the college website. Federal work-study is part of the College’s Student Employment Program.

Students must apply for jobs through the appropriate supervisor. Jobs typically consist of cleaning, kitchen work, maintenance and office assistance. Jobs typically allow up to 10 hours of work per week.

All information pertaining to student employment can be found at https://nook.marlboro.edu/public/offices/student_employment.

Responsibilities & Rights of the Student

Responsibilities

  1. To attend all Student Employment meetings.
  2. To give a copy of your class schedule to your supervisor and create a work schedule based around it.
  3. To adhere to the work schedule while the College is open, including days immediately preceding or following vacations. (The student is not expected to work during academic breaks or after the end of classes in May.)
  4. Should illness or other unavoidable circumstance make it impossible for you to attend your job, the supervisor must be notified in advance and a suitable substitute found if the supervisor feels it is appropriate.
  5. To arrive at the job site on time, work the scheduled hours and perform duties as assigned in a cheerful and satisfactory manner.
  6. To complete electronic time sheets honestly, accurately, and according to published payroll schedule.
  7. Once the job has been accepted, to remain on the job for at least a semester. Changing jobs is allowable only under extreme circumstances.
  8. To maintain strict confidentiality of information you are exposed to as a result of your work responsibilities.

Rights

  1. To receive adequate supervision and reasonable task assignments from your supervisor.
  2. To be paid the Vermont Minimum Wage.
  3. To receive pay checks on a bi-weekly basis.
  4. To have supervisors approve electronic time card to the Accounting Office in accordance with the published payroll schedule.
  5. To receive one written warning notice if your work or attendance, or time card submission is not satisfactory. This notice must include an explanation of the problem and a stated probation period.
  6. To receive a written dismissal notice if your work does not improve after the warning.
  7. To appeal a decision of dismissal before the Student Employment Committee.

Responsibilities & Rights of the Supervisor

Responsibilities

  1. To provide the Student Employment Coordinator with a full job description for each position requested, approved by the budget manager.
  2. To provide adequate supervision of Work-Study students.
  3. To check time sheets for accuracy, and approve them in to the Accounting Office before noon on Monday.
  4. To issue a written warning notice to students with time frame needed to resolve the problem. A copy of the notice must be provided to the Student Employment Coordinator.
  5. To issue a written notice of dismissal when circumstances warrant, detailing reasons for the dismissal. A copy of the notice must be provided to the Student Employment Coordinator.

Rights

  1. To expect students to arrive on time, work scheduled hours and perform duties as assigned in a satisfactory manner.
  2. To request a new student employee if the supervisor’s current student does not fulfill the requirements of the job.

Reason For Dismissal

Any student falsifying a time sheet may be dismissed and may be required to repay all wages earned to that date. In addition, he/she will be ineligible for employment at Marlboro College in the future.

If, in the judgment of the supervisor, the student worker is not performing adequately in his or her job, the student may be dismissed after a formal written warning has been issued.

If a student fails to report to work when scheduled or assigned by a supervisor, he or she may be dismissed after a formal written warning has been issued.

If a student fails to work for two weeks (one pay period) without an explanation of special circumstances, his or her employment may be canceled for that semester without a warning notice.

If the Committee rules that the job dismissal was warranted, the student is not eligible for job placement until the following academic year. A student dismissed a second time will not be eligible for a job at Marlboro College.

Fines

Late Payment Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if payment is not received by the due date.

Late/Provisional Enrollment Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if a student fails to register on enrollment day.

Late Registration Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if a student fails to file their course registration with the Registrar’s office by the deadline.

Late Motor Vehicle or Firearm Registration Fee: $25 plus $10 for each successive day, or portion thereof, after the appropriate deadline.

Return Check Charge: There is a $30.00 charge for each check returned by your bank.

Fire

Step 1

Evacuate to locations posted on emergency signs.

Step 2

Dial 911.

Step 3

If this occurs during Business Hours, call *611 and page the Fire Chief at 802.742.1647. If it’s after hours, weekends or a holiday, page the SLC at 877.730.6051 and the Fire Chief at 802.742.1647

Fire and Safety

The Town of Marlboro has a Volunteer Fire Company which may be called in the event of a fire. The Fire Chief and/or a member of the Fire and Safety Commission will provide appropriate direction or instruction. There will be periodic fire drills, and participation in them is mandatory for all persons on campus at the time. (See Article II of the Marlboro College Bylaws.)

As a measure of safety in case of fire, no person may sleep in any College-owned building other than those designated for use as housing (dormitories, cottages, cabins, apartments, houses.)

No fires may be kindled outdoors on College-owned land without permission of the Director of Plant & Operations or his designee. This includes bonfires, cooking or campfires. (See Article II of the Marlboro College Bylaws.)

First Year Seminars

All first-year students entering the fall semester at a class status of Freshman 1 or Freshman 2 are required to take a first year seminar. First year seminars introduce students to the three parts of Marlboro Promise and provide skill-building opportunities necessary for academic success at Marlboro. Connected to student life activities, the seminars are united by a common theme, on which the faculty teaching the seminars decide. Students will learn what constitutes a genuine question or problem and how they can address it in a creative and disciplined manner within Marlboro’s curricular model. Some classes and evening events linked to the seminar will introduce students to the variety of support services available (academic and otherwise) at Marlboro College. Students may only take it once, regardless of the result.

Functions of the Business Offices

  • The Chief Planning and Budget Officer is responsible for budget planning and control, and the Bookstore.
  • The Director of Plant and Operations is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the plant, and purchasing.

Functions of the Dean of Faculty

 

  • administers the academic program, including Plans of Concentration, as formulated by the faculty and is responsible for the advising system and graduate school guidance;
  • arranges with members of the faculty the terms of their appointments;
  • has authority to resolve questions of academic jurisdiction within the faculty;
  • presides at Faculty Meetings in the absence of the President;
  • is chair ex officio of the Committee on Faculty and serves on the Curriculum Committee;
  • has the authority to grant incompletes in course work;
  • is responsible for reinstatements, granting of leaves of absence and terms in absentia;
  • is designated as the Dean of the College and is responsible for the general administration of the College in the absence of the President.

Functions of the Dean of Students

  • administers those student regulations not delegated to the Town Meeting or to other administrative offices;
  • the Dean of Students or his or her delegate is the administrative and faculty liaison with the officers of the Town Meeting, and is ex officio chair of the Dean’s Advisory Committee.
  • while the Dean of Students is responsible and ultimately accountable to the President, faculty, and Trustees for general standards of order, safety and decency of the College community, he or she is not bound by the separate standards of any of these persons in performing his or her regular duties as advisor to the officials and citizens of the College community government.
  • is responsible for assignment of student housing, the Resident Assistant program, the Recreation program, career guidance, the Health Education program, and new student orientation;
  • administers the medical and counseling programs;
  • has the authority to grant medical leaves of absence for a definite or indefinite period, and for readmission from medical leave or withdrawal, on the advice of College medical authorities.

Functions of the President

  • responsible to the Board for general management of the College;
  • directly responsible to the Board of Trustees for the financial and business administration of the College, and for its relation to other communities, both civil and academic;
  • ex officio a member of the Board of Trustees, the faculty, and the Council of Academic Advisors;
  • acts as chair of the faculty;
  • responsible to the Board of Trustees, jointly with the faculty, for the academic program of the College. The President should maintain that program within the objectives of the College, as determined by the Board. The President is also responsible jointly with the faculty for maintaining order at the College.
  • additional duties consistent with the President’s Office may occasionally be assigned to a Dean or business officer by the President.
  • with the approval of the Board of Trustees, may occasionally create new senior administrative positions. The President should apply standards for other senior administrative offices to appointments and terminations in these newly created positions. Duties of these positions will be specified by letter from the President to the appointee, at the time the appointment is made.
  • junior administrative positions may be created occasionally by the President. Appointment and termination of appointment to these positions are to be made by the President in consultation with the senior administrative officer concerned. Duties of these positions will be specified by letter from the President to the appointee, at the time the appointment is made.

Gas Leak & Hazardous Spills

Step 1

Cease all operations! Do not switch on the lights or any electrical equipment. Immediately page the Director of Plant and Operations at 802.742.1653.

Step 2

Evacuate to predetermined and posted safe zones.

General Crisis Response

Once you have contacted 911, *611 or the Student Life Coordinator (SLC), please follow their instructions for what to do next.

General Expectations

Marlboro College complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding payment of wages and benefits to employees. The College will pay wages and salary as described by this policy and required by law, and will not make pay deductions that violate either the federal or state laws. As an employee, you must truthfully report your hours and you are encouraged to review your paystubs regularly for accuracy.

General Functions

Jointly with the President, the faculty is responsible to the Board of Trustees for the academic program of the College, within the objectives of the College as determined by the Board. Specifically, within these objectives, the faculty is responsible for:

  • formulating academic policy
  • establishing academic standards
  • formulating admissions policy
  • establishing admissions standards
  • recommending candidates for degrees

General Standards of Conduct

Marlboro College regards proper, ethical and professional standards of conduct as important elements of a functional community. As an employee, you are expected to act ethically, maturely and responsibly. You are expected to follow the policies and standards described in this handbook as well as use common sense with behaviors or actions not covered in this handbook.

Grades

Marlboro College Grade Definition

Pass/Fail Option

Final Plan Grades on the Transcript

GPA

Reporting of Grades and Academic Status

Evaluations of Student Work

Auditing Courses

Deadline for Accepting Student Work

  The College defines its grades as follows:

A =

superb performance; unqualified recommendation for continued work in a particular field

B =

average to good work; a qualified encouragement for continued work in a particular field

C =

acceptable work

D =

unsatisfactory work; credit given toward graduation requirements, but not toward the minimum of 12 credits needed for good standing at the end of each term;

F =

failure, no credit

P =

Pass: equivalent to a C- or better

S =

Satisfactory progress (midterm or progress grade)

S- =

Less than satisfactory progress (midterm or progress grade). S and S- are equivalent to C- or better.

U =

Unsatisfactory (midterm or progress grade)

WD =

Did not complete work after medical leave

WP =

Withdrew from course passing

WF =

Withdrew from course failing

AU =

Audit

I =

Incomplete; temporary grade granted by Dean of Faculty for extenuating circumstances or Dean of Students for medical reasons

NC =

No credit; given in Brattleboro Music Center courses when the student fails to pay fees for lessons

* =

see Senior Grades, below

 

Thus, an A in an introductory course is an unqualified recommendation that a student go on to intermediate or advanced courses in that field. An A on a Plan should indicate a teacher’s willingness to write a letter of unqualified recommendation to a graduate school in that field. A student doing C work may do a Plan in that field if the Sponsor agrees, but he or she should be aware that his or her work will likely be undistinguished.

Uniformity of Grading

No faculty member may use a grading system different from that used by the rest of his or her colleagues, unless it has first won approval by means of faculty vote.

Changing or Appealing a Grade

Grades may not be changed after the final faculty meeting of a term without written permission from the Dean of Faculty. Such permission is appropriate in instances of acknowledged faculty error in determining the grade, where an error has occurred in reporting or recording a grade, or in instances of a belated discovery of cheating or plagiarism on work in the course.

A student who believes that his or her grade in a course is inappropriate must promptly discuss the grade with the faculty member or members involved - not later than the end of the second week of class of the next academic term. If the grade recorded was indeed an error, the faculty member(s) will submit an official grade change form to the Registrar through the Dean of Faculty.

A student who, after initiating such discussion with the grading faculty member(s), believes that the contested grade is unfair may appeal the course grade in writing to the Dean of Faculty, with a copy to the grading faculty member. The letter must state the grounds for appeal, that is the specific alleged unfairness or arbitrariness or departure from College procedures or standards, and must be lodged by the end of the fourth week of the semester following the one in which the grade was given.

The Dean will consult with the faculty member(s) and the student to determine whether the grade should be changed. In considering an appeal, the presumption is that the faculty member has graded appropriately, and clear evidence to the contrary must be established to justify changing a grade. If the faculty member agrees to a new grade, he or she will submit a grade change form to the Registrar through the Dean of Faculty. If the faculty member and the Dean cannot agree, but the Dean is nonetheless convinced that the contested grade is unfair, arbitrary, or inconsistent with College procedures or standards, the Dean may, after reporting the evidence for his or her findings to the Committee on Faculty, enter a new grade with the Registrar over the objection of the faculty member.

Junior Grades

During the first year on Plan, standard grades (A-F) are given in courses and tutorials.

Senior Grades

Seniors may receive progress grades (S, S-, U) or letter grades for Plan courses and tutorials taken in the two semesters of their senior year.

Progress grades appear on a student’s transcript until after the oral evaluation, at which point the Registrar replaces progress grades with asterisks (*) on the transcript. The “*” leads to a statement under the Final Plan Grade: “Applies to all senior year Plan courses and tutorials.” The progress grades of seniors who do not complete their Plans remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

Standard grades remain on the transcript after the oral evaluation (i.e., they are not replaced with asterisks as with progress grades).

The student may choose between progress or letter grades at the time of registration and may change that choice no later than the deadline for dropping a course. The Plan sponsor and instructor must agree where letter grades are specified. Plan courses and tutorials that continue for more than one semester must receive the same treatment both semesters.

Seniors under the cumulative grading system who do not complete their Plan will (for transfer purposes) receive a Pass in courses they have completed at a satisfactory level.

  Pass/Fail Option

After the first semester of the freshman year, a student may register on a pass/fail basis for up to two courses. These courses may not be taken in the same semester. The deadline for registering for a course on a pass/fail basis is two weeks after final registration.

This option is designed to encourage diversity and is available with the permission of the advisor. Advisors should grant such permission only in cases where the proposed course serves to introduce the student to new areas of study.

  Final Plan Grades on the Transcript

Under the heading “Plan of Concentration Description and Evaluation” there will appear on the transcript: (1) a descriptive title and abstract for the Plan; (2) a listing of the individual parts of the Work, along with the associated percentages and the individual grades assigned by the examining committee; and (3) the final or composite grade. (See also Grades under Plan of Concentration.

  GPA

The College does not use grade-point averages, nor does it assign class rankings. Students required to compute the GPA for transfer or graduate school applications should use the following method:

Use assigned letter grades for freshman, sophomore, and junior years and for senior year non-Plan courses; use final Plan grade for Plan credits in the senior year, regardless of whether those courses/tutorials have letter grades or asterisks.

A detailed guide for computing your GPA (“How to Compute Your Grade Point Average”) may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office.

  Reporting of Grades and Academic Status

Grades will be reported to the student. Upon the request of the student, grades will also be sent to parents and/or guardian. It is the student’s responsibility to inform his or her parents of academic progress.

  Evaluations of Student Work

Each instructor is responsible for seeing each of his or her students individually at least once a term, toward the end of the term, in order to evaluate the student’s work. At the student’s request, a summary of this evaluation may be placed in the student’s file.

Written evaluations of a student’s work, in whole or in part, shall be made available to the Dean of Faculty’s Office upon request of the Dean, student, or student’s advisor. This evaluation may remain in the student’s file but will not be part of his or her transcript.

  Auditing Courses

Students may register to audit a course only until two weeks after the final registration deadline. In order for an audit course to appear on the student’s permanent record (grade of AU), the faculty member must notify the Registrar’s Office of the student’s attendance throughout the term.

  Deadline for Accepting Student Work

The student deadline for turning in semester work is at faculty discretion, but no later that 4:30 p.m. on the Tuesday before final faculty meeting. The deadline for the submission of grades will be 48 hours before the final faculty meeting. No faculty member may accept work for the determination of term grades after the final deadline. Work submitted after the final deadline may be considered in faculty discussions concerning action on student performance but may not be used as a basis for changing student grades. The establishment of a final deadline for the submission of work shall in no way abridge the right of faculty members to set deadlines prior to the final deadline or to impose penalties for last submission.

Grievance Policy and Appeals Process

Students who think they have been denied equal access to the College’s academic programs, resources, or other services because of a disability may file a detailed written grievance with the Dean of Faculty as soon as possible after the alleged discrimination occurred, but in no event more than 60 days thereafter. In order to establish the basis for such a grievance, students must have filed a Disability Accommodation Request Form and supporting documentation with the Assistant Dean of Academic Advising and discussed their request with the Assistant Dean. The College encourages students to first speak with the Assistant Dean in order to resolve their complaints informally. If informal steps do not satisfactorily address the complaints or there is a complaint about the Assistant Dean of Academic Advising, students may file the written grievance described above to the Dean of Faculty. The Dean of Faculty will investigate the complaint and issue a report, normally within 30 days.

Appeals Process: Students who are not satisfied with the Dean of Faculty’s decision may file an appeal by contacting the President. Appeals must be submitted within seven business days of when the student receives notice of the Dean of Faculty’s decision. The President may affirm or modify previous decision made and/or may send the matter back for reconsideration by the ADA Committee and the Assistant Dean of Advising. The President will communicate a final decision to the student in writing.

Grievance Procedure

Employees with grievances (other than discrimination or sexual harassment grievances, which are addressed in a separate policy) are encouraged to follow the procedure outlined below. Please see the appendix for Marlboro’s full discrimination or sexual harassment prevention policies and their grievance procedures.

 

Definitions: A grievant is an employee who feels he or she has a grievance resulting from non-compliance or misapplication of the College employment policy. A respondent is an employee alleged to have been the cause of a grievance. Note that the College as a whole may be accused of being the cause of a grievance, in which case the president or the president’s designee will be considered the respondent.

 

Grievance Procedure: The Grievance Procedure suggests the following steps:

  1. The grievant should discuss the matter with the respondent, making an effort to resolve the situation at the level of person-to-person.
  2. The grievant should discuss the matter with his or her supervisor, making an effort to resolve the situation with his or her assistance. As applicable, the respondent may also engage his or her supervisor in resolving the grievance.
  3. The grievant should discuss the matter with the human resources office, making every effort to resolve the situation there.
  4. If the above steps fail, the grievant may request that the complaint be referred to a temporary grievance committee consisting of three employees of Marlboro College: one chosen by the grievant, one by the respondent, and one chosen by the first two members of the committee, and accepted by both grievant and respondent. Each grievance committee shall decide whether a grievance is justified or not, and shall make a recommendation to the president.

 

Presidential Review: The president of the College, who may accept, amend, reject or return for reconsideration the committee’s report, will review all recommendations of each temporary grievance committee. The president will present, in writing, reasons for requesting any reconsideration. The final decision on any grievance, and the responsibility for implementation of any recommended action, will rest with the president, except in instances when the president is the respondent. If the latter is the case, the review and final decision will be made by an ad hoc committee of the board of trustees, to be named by the chair in such a manner as he or she may see fit.

Health Benefit Continuation (COBRA)

The Federal Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) gives employees and their qualified dependents the option to continue health insurance coverage under the College’s health plan when a “qualifying event” would normally result in the loss of eligibility. Employees must be enrolled in the College’s heath plan before the qualifying event occurs. Some common qualifying events are resignation, employment termination for a reason other than gross misconduct, death of the employee, a reduction in an employee’s hours, a leave of absence, divorce or a dependent child no longer meeting eligibility requirements as a result of age or full-time student status.

Under COBRA, the employee or dependent pays the full cost of coverage at the College’s group rate plus a two percent administration fee. Employees must notify the human resources office that a qualifying event occurred. The College provides each eligible employee with a written notice describing their rights and obligations under COBRA when the employee or dependent becomes eligible for coverage.

Health Insurance

Marlboro College has one health insurance plan: a high deductible plan with a health savings account (HSA). This plan covers both your basic and major medical health insurance. All regular staff members who work 30 hours or more per week on an ongoing basis are eligible to join one of these plans. Temporary and student employees are not eligible for health insurance. Premiums are paid by the College with a contribution from the employee for individual, two-person and family coverage; dependents (lawful spouses, unmarried children under the age of 26, and domestic partners) may be covered. Please contact the human resources office for current employee/employer contribution rates. Eligible employees may join a health insurance plan 30 days after date of hire. After that, employees may only switch plans, enroll in, drop from a plan, or make changes to their plans during open enrollment or because of “qualifying events” (please contact the human resources office for information on qualifying events). Open enrollment will take place each year prior to the January 1 effective date for the health insurance renewal.

Health Services

The Total Health Center provides services Monday through Friday. The schedule is posted in the health center as well as on our website.

We offer individual, group, and couples counseling, as well as complete medical services – including prescriptions, women’s health, and immunizations. We are staffed with two nurse practitioners,, two licensed mental health professionals, a psychiatric nurse practitioner and an office manager. We address the student as a whole and see the connection between physical well-being and mental/emotional health. We encourage students on medications to work with their home providers but are able to prescribe medicine to those students who may require them. Students may avail themselves of the counseling and medical services without repercussions. We encourage any student who needs support to seek out help at no charge.

The college also has a consulting physician who works in collaboration with the staff. The consulting physician is available for telephone consultation when the health center is not open and will occasionally see students after hours if needed.

Our services are confidential. In compliance with the federal HIPAA laws we will not disclose a student’s presence in treatment or the nature of that treatment to anyone, including parents, without the student’s written permission. This can be a frustration to parents and we encourage students to talk with their parents and let them know they are seeking help, but they are not required to do so. In general, the only reason that this confidentiality would be broken would be for risk of immediate physical harm to the student or to another person.

A student may make an appointment to see a counselor or medical provider by calling the Health Center Office Manager at 802-258-9335 (ext. 335), by contacting one of our professionals by email, or by stopping in Mon-Fri, 8:30-4:00. We make every effort to see the student as quickly as possible, often the same day if someone is in acute distress. After hours and on weekends there is a Student Life Coordinator on call as well as a Resident Assistant. Each carries a pager for emergencies.

The staff at the Total Health Center welcomes phone calls from parents who have concerns that their student is undergoing physical or emotional difficulties. This is often a challenging situation for parents who may live far away. While we are unable to disclose whether or not a student is being seen at the health center without a signed release of information, the information you provide can be very helpful to our staff. You may also call the Dean of Students to both share information and discuss resources on campus.

In some cases the student might require more intensive or specialized treatment than the Total Health Center can provide. These students, as well as those who wish to be seen off campus, are referred to outside local providers. The health center also uses local hospitals for back up for psychiatric and medical emergencies.

Services available through the Total Health Center include, but are not limited to:

  1. General outpatient primary care that includes, but is not limited to: diagnosis and treatment of acute illness and injuries and managing chronic medication
  2. Information and counseling on contraceptive choices and prescriptions for contraceptives
  3. Reproductive health evaluations and exams for women and men including gynecological exams and PAP smears for women
  4. Pregnancy testing and desired referrals
  5. Information on sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV/AIDS), their prevention and other health concerns
  6. Diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections
  7. Confidential HIV testing
  8. Information related to alcohol and drug use/abuse
  9. Referrals to other medical services and clinics in the area, as necessary
  10. Assistance to students in recovery who wish to contact others on campus who are in recovery
  11. Information on AA, NA, AL-ANON, ACOA meetings
  12. Sunlamps to help treat Seasonal Affective Disorder

These services are covered by the comprehensive health fee that is paid by all students. Certain medications, supplies and laboratory tests are not covered by this fee. The physical exams required for the health forms completed by incoming students are not covered by this fee. Services/supplies not covered by the health fee are billed to the student through student accounts in a confidential manner.

After hours emergency coverage is provided by the resident assistants (RAs) and student life coordinators (SLCs) who are trained in advanced first aid and CPR, and who also have first-aid kits available. An on-call physician is available at all times by phone and may be reached with the assistance of any RA or SLC.

Medical policy: All students at Marlboro College fall within the bounds of the college medical policy and are expected to abide by the few rules it includes. Students are required to submit a health record and immunization form as part of their registration process. Failure to do so may result in incomplete registration and could jeopardize the student’s enrollment status.

The college nurse practitioners are registered nurses with a master’s degree and have advanced education and clinical training enabling them to diagnose and treat medical problems. The nurse practitioners are nationally certified for an adult or family practice. The N.P’s. practice under the rules and regulations of the State of Vermont. If necessary, students may be referred to specialty providers associated with Brattleboro Memorial Hospital. Students who wish to choose other providers may, but should request the provider to relay pertinent information to the health center. Students who choose an alternate provider of health care should be aware that these services are not directly covered by the comprehensive health fee.

Students are forbidden to exchange medications or to take prescription drugs not prescribed by the Total Health Center or a medical professional. The health center must be informed of any prescription medication in a student’s possession. Similarly, students are expected to make necessary appointments with local specialists through the Total Health Center. This is so that the medical staff has full knowledge of all treatment any student may be receiving in order to provide appropriate care should a problem arise on campus.

Students with illnesses that are highly contagious may be confined to their dormitory bedrooms or, in some cases, may be encouraged to leave campus. More serious cases may be treated in a hospital.

The college has a serious responsibility for promoting the health of all students, individually and collectively. Students are asked to consider the welfare of the college, as an institution and as a community, as well as their own personal well-being, in responding to medical regulations. Since medical services are available through the health center, students are urged to take advantage of them at the first sign of illness. Students are also encouraged to assume some responsibility for their well-being by keeping personal items such as Tylenol, minor cold and cough remedies and Band-Aids on hand rather than relying on others for these needs.

Hiring Employees

Department heads hire staff positions. The filling of positions is approved by the president or the chief financial officer. Vacant positions will generally be posted on the College website and, if needed, on local or national job boards and/or newspapers. Résumés for vacant staff positions may be submitted to the human resources office. Following a review of résumés, the best-qualified candidates will be interviewed. Hiring procedures will be consistent with the equal employment opportunity and affirmative action policy of the College described in this handbook. The College reserves the right to transfer, terminate, or eliminate positions as deemed necessary.

Hiring of Relatives

Marlboro College does not prohibit the employment of spouses, partners or other relatives in the same department or administrative unit, provided the relative does not participate in recommendations or decisions affecting hiring, work assignments, promotion, demotion, or salary of the relative, and provided that no preferential policy toward relatives is used to deny equal opportunity. No individual will be hired into a position that could be influenced by a relative. In the case of the employment of spouses, partners or relatives in the same department or administrative unit, the College will decide at its own discretion whether a reassignment of duties, responsibilities or jobs is necessary.

Hiring Procedures

The responsibility for hiring new faculty is in the hands of the faculty. The procedure depends upon the ability of the members of the faculty to define and discuss the needs of the curriculum and the College in an open and thoughtful manner and avoids the imposition of considerations outside those needs.

Step I

When a vacancy occurs on the faculty, the faculty members most closely concerned will meet with the Curriculum Committee to discuss the nature of the position and the needs of the College. The group will develop a job description and an advertisement based on this discussion. Note: This policy does not address either the issue of what constitutes a vacancy or how a vacancy, once identified, is to be allocated by discipline or by area.

Step II

The Committee on Faculty, supplemented by those faculty most closely concerned, constitute the search committee. The search committee will meet to discuss the mechanics of the search, the job description, and the criteria for selection, which will be based on the levels of competence demanded of successful Marlboro faculty members. As nearly as practicable, scheduling should be arranged in advance to insure that all members of the search committee can participate fully in the process. Note: The discussion among the members of the faculty and the members of the Committee on Faculty must be full and open. While unanimity regarding the exact characteristics of a successful candidate is unlikely, each member of the search committee should make clear his or her preferences within the limits of the job description developed under Step I.

Step III

The search committee will review applications using criteria discussed fully and openly in Step II. Under normal circumstances, at least four candidates will be selected for interviews.

Step IV

So far as practical, candidates selected for interviews will be treated uniformly throughout the interview process. Note: The search committee should devise a procedure which enables the candidates to demonstrate their fitness for the position. Each candidate might be asked to bring projected course descriptions and syllabi, to give a public lecture, or to teach a class.

Step V

Following the interviews, the committee will rank the candidates based on the criteria selected in Step II and on the interviews. The committee will recommend to the President that the position be offered to the candidates in order of this ranking. No candidate will be included on this list who is not fully qualified to be a Marlboro College faculty member.

If there are two or more candidates with roughly equal qualifications, the search committee should, before making its recommendations, consider the need for diversity of thought, training, disposition, age, race, gender, and ethnicity on the faculty.

Holidays

Marlboro provides eligible employees several paid holidays to celebrate or mark significant landmark days throughout the year. Before the start of the fiscal year, the college publishes and distributes a schedule of staff holidays for the year ahead. Generally, the College recognizes the following holidays (*indicates days coinciding with holidays on the academic calendar):

  • Independence Day (July 4th)
  • Labor Day (First Monday in September)
  • Hendricks Days* (Monday in mid-October, varies based on academic calendar)
  • Thanksgiving and the day after* (Fourth Thursday in November, and day after)
  • Christmas, New Years and the business days in between* (December 25th through January 1st)
  • Martin Luther King Day (Third Monday in January)
  • Presidents’ Day (Third Monday in February)
  • Ragle Day (Friday before Memorial Day)
  • Memorial Day (Last Monday in May)

Non-exempt staff members required to work on certain holidays (for example: to provide ongoing student services, to perform time-sensitive plant operations work, to process payroll, or to interact with the broader community) will receive holiday pay for the holiday as well as pay for all hours worked on the holiday. Only hours worked will count toward overtime calculations. Exempt staff members who must work on a holiday are encouraged to work with their supervisors to arrange for alternative time off. Unused holiday time cannot be saved or accrued. Staff members do not receive holiday pay if a holiday occurs on a day they are not usually scheduled to work.

Hostile Individual/Intruder

When an individual in a campus building or on campus is actively causing deadly harm or the threat of imminent deadly harm to people.

Step 1

Immediately seek cover. Some recommendations:

  • Run away from the threat if you can, as fast as you can.
  • Do not run in a straight line. Use buildings, trees, shrubs, and cars as cover.
  • If you are in a building, lock yourself in classrooms, dorm rooms, and offices as a means of protection.
  • Stay low, away from windows and barricade their door(s) if possible and use furniture or desks as cover.
  • Be aware of alternate exits if it becomes necessary to flee.
  • If possible, cover any windows or openings that have a direct line of sight into the hallway
  • If you decide to hide, take into consideration the area in which you are hiding. Will I be found? Is this really a good spot to remain hidden?
  • If the person(s) is causing death or serious physical injury to others and you are unable to run or hide you may choose to play dead if other victims are around you.
  • If hiding or playing dead, do not give away your position or stand up until the Police give the all-clear sign.

Step 2

  • Dial 911. Give as many details as possible relative to location, number of assailants, means of aggression and other pertinent information. Do not sound the fire alarm to evacuate the building. People may be placed in harm’s way when they are attempting to evacuate the building.

Hours of Operation

The College administration is open to the public during regular business hours of 8:30 AM until 4:30 PM on the Marlboro College campus and 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM on the Brattleboro campus, Monday through Friday except for holidays. However, the programs and facilities of the College continue twenty-four hours a day and seven days a week. Therefore, employees in many positions may work schedules outside of regular business hours on a regular or occasional basis.

How Financial Aid Awards are Determined

The first element in the determination of a student’s award is the financial aid budget set by the College to cover the student’s Estimated Educational Cost, which includes tuition and fees, room and board (or expenses for those not living on campus), books, supplies, travel, personal expenses and Stafford loan origination fees. Students who have legitimate educational costs which are not reflected in the budget may state these costs in a letter to the Financial Aid Office. These needs may be met, if possible, by loans, job opportunities, or scholarships from private sources. Costs which reflect individual choice, such as ownership of an automobile, cannot be considered in providing financial aid.

From the information provided on the application form, the FAFSA determines expected Family Contribution. This is calculated by examining the income and assets of both the student and parents for a dependent student or the student or the student and spouse, if applicable, for an independent student.

The difference between the estimated educational cost and the expected family contribution is the student’s financial need. To meet this need, our office recommends a package that may include a federal Stafford Loan, Work-Study opportunity, other sources of state and/or outside aid, and, if the need warrants, a Marlboro Grant.

Work-Study students may work up to ten (10) hours per week during the academic year. Those who choose to work fewer hours may not earn their total award. If a Work-Study opportunity is part of the student’s financial aid package, it will appear on the financial award letter but will not be reflected as an anticipated credit on tuition and fee bills sent out by the Student Accounts office. Students participating in the Work-Study program will be compensated through bi-weekly payroll checks. Students have the option to sign over student employment earnings to be applied against that term’s charges.

We encourage students to apply for scholarships or grants from private agencies. Outside scholarships and State Grants (other than Vermont State Grants) are integrated into the financial aid package in the following way: half is used to reduce any Marlboro Grant and half is used to reduce self-help awards (Stafford loan, Alternative loan, Parent loan, or Work-Study). If the original intent of the outside scholarship foundation is not to reduce the institutional funds for which the student has qualified, our Office of Financial Aid will consider this when integrating the funds.

If You Need Immediate Assistance

If you fear for your safety, or immediately after an assault:

  • First find a safe environment away from any person of concern (it need only be temporary). When possible, ask a trusted person to stay with you and assist you with getting help.
  • Even if you are unsure initially whether you will want to pursue criminal charges, file a complaint with the College, or seek a protection order, it is important to preserve all possible evidence in case you decide at some point to do so. Therefore, refrain from changing clothes, showering or otherwise changing your physical state after an incident, until after you have consulted with medical personnel about how to best preserve evidence. Consult with College officials, law enforcement officers or health care professionals regarding your ability to have evidence collected by a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (“SANE”). Endeavor to preserve other evidence that may be relevant to a case of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, such as text messages, email messages, other electronically stored information, and other physical evidence. To obtain immediate medical care or to contact the police, phone 911 for emergency services.
    • OR contact the Women’s Freedom Center 24 Hour Hotline: 802-254-6954. They can help you secure immediate medical care, accompany you to the hospital if necessary, and explain your options for on and off campus support. This includes speaking with other confidential resources on campus, pursuing an informal or formal investigation within the college or involving local law enforcement. The Women’s Freedom Center serves all victims regardless of gender.
    • OR on nights and weekends, page the Student Life Coordinator (SLC) at (877-730-6051) for a no questions asked ride to the hospital.

Inclement Weather

In most circumstances, you are expected to travel to work in inclement weather, particularly if your work responsibilities directly contribute to the overall safety of the College community. Available personal time may be used when you must stay home in the following cases:

  • You deem the roads unsafe between home and work,
  • You must care for children during a school snow day,
  • You rely on public transportation, which is not running due to weather.

If roads or childcare options improve when there is still the possibility of at least a half-day’s work, you are expected to travel to work at that point. Similarly, you may use available personal time to leave work early when there are strong indications the roads in between are or are becoming unsafe. You must communicate with your supervisor of your intent to be absent, tardy or leave early due to inclement weather. No person should be put at unnecessary risk because of his or her employment.

In the rare event that the College must close, the College will announce a delayed start or an early leave, through campus email, notification on the College website or an announcement on the “events hotline” at 802-451-7151. It is the employees’ responsibility to monitor these sources of information. A closure of the College announced by the College administration does not count against personal time.

Independent Students

Independent students do not need to provide parental information to be considered for financial aid. In general, students entering college as dependent students will be considered dependent students throughout their Marlboro career, or until the student reaches the age of 24.

Information Policy

All student information will be kept confidential among the staff of the OAS, unless authorized in writing by the student or required by law.

Information Security Policy

A harsh reality of the modern age is that all community members – staff, faculty, and students alike – must be very conscious, and share in the responsibility, of safeguarding private personal and institutional data. Though IT strives to keep firewalls, virus protection, and other mechanical security devices in place, you, the user, are often unwittingly a critical attack vector in a data breach. Confidentiality, integrity, and accessibility of all data, are of the most importance in response to protect the quality and validity of stored information. Any inspections of electronic data, emails, and data stored on Marlboro College servers and computers that may occur will be governed by Marlboro’s College Operating Procedures and laws that may be applicable for both State and Federal data regulations.

The Information Security Policy is designed to protect data that is maintained by Marlboro College while providing education on safe computer practices that includes receiving e-mails, data-retention, and Cyber Security.

  • DO NOT ever give anyone your password. IT will never ask for it and any request should be treated as a phishing attempt and security incident.
  • Passwords must be changed every 180 days.
  • Computer equipment and sensitive data  must be secured at all time.
    • Doors to offices are to be locked when not in use.
    • Log out of all secure websites and or databases before leaving the computer.
    • Computers in public spaces are to be locked to a desk and or other permanent device located in the office using a “Computer Cable Security Lock.”
    • Users are to lock their devices when not in use by hitting “Ctrl+Alt+Delete” then selecting lock.
    • No software may be downloaded without the knowledge and consent of the IT department.
    • No plug and play USB storage devices are to be used on ITS without prior IT approval.
    • No personal devices are to be connected to the “Admin” network. A “Marlboro College” wireless network is provided for personal devices.
  • E-mails are very useful for spear phishing and malware attacks. Most reconnaissance for malware and spear phishing attacks are performed by e-mail. Therefore, the following provisions have been adopted.
    • Do not open email attachments or embedded links from unknown senders.
    • Do not follow suspicious web links in email. If you are unsure if it is suspicious or not contact techsupport@marlboro.edu for information.
    • No files are to be downloaded from untrusted sources. When in doubt send an email to “techsupport@marlboro.edu” for further guidance.
    • Do not send secure information through email. See charts below for more guidance.

Types of Information

Security Level

Risk

Description

Examples

Secure

High

  • Identity Theft
  • Financial Fraud
  • Illegal Info Disclosure
Legally protected data and other data where disclosure would pose a significant legal risk to individuals and/or the college. Typically contains personally identifying information.
  • Social Security numbers
  • Birthdates
  • Passports (scans, numbers, etc.)
  • Drivers’ licenses (scans, number, etc.)
  • Credit card numbers
  • Bank information and account numbers
  • Medical information (HIPPA)
  • Login passwords
Confidential Medium
  • Academic fraud
  • Privacy violation
  • Inappropriate PR issue
Data that should be carefully protected, but poses less financial or legal risk to the individual or college if exposed.
  • Student advising reports
  • Final grades
  • Classwork
  • Intellectual property
  • College ID numbers
  • Human resources Data
  • Software licenses
  • Trustee reports
Public Low to none Publically available data Anything you’d on a public page of the college’s website, including names, email addresses, etc.

Ideally, all secure and confidential data should be stored and accessed only via the system that houses it. For example, if a staff member needs a list of students on academic probation, or health insurance information, or students with financial needs, she should be granted access in the authoritative systems (e.g. Sonis, Education Edge, PowerFaids, et cetera) to view that data directly, avoiding creating and emailing external spreadsheets. When that’s not feasible, there are several solutions for storing and sharing information.

Storage or Transport Mechanism Secure Confidential Public
Google Drive/Docs DO NOT USE OK, with caution OK
Email/Gmail DO NOT USE OK, with caution OK
Marlboro laptop DO NOT USE OK, with caution OK (Google Drive Recommended)
Your own computer DO NOT USE DO NOT USE OK (Google Drive Recommended)
Your phone or tablet DO NOT USE DO NOT USE OK (Google Drive Recommended)
Thumb drive DO NOT USE DO NOT USE OK (Google Drive Recommended)
Marlboro encrypted drive or file OK, with caution OK, with caution OK (Google Drive Recommended)

Echo Common (K Drive)

OK OK OK

Nook secure file upload

OK OK OK (Email reccomended)
Website (main site, public area of Nook) DO NOT USE DO NOT USE OK
Social media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, et cetera) DO NOT USE DO NOT USE OK, with caution

Email

Email is not a secure medium and should never be used for secure data with the possible exception of encrypted files. Email sent to another @marlboro.edu address stays on Google and Marlboro servers and can be considered confidential as long as both you and the other users are following best practices (e.g. not auto-forwarding Marlboro mail to another account). However, confidential data should not be sent to an address in another domain as confidentiality cannot be assured.

Phone and Tablet Policy

Content under revision.

Google Apps for Education

Google Apps for Education consists of a set of applications including Gmail, Calendar, Google Drive, Google Docs, Google Sheets, Google Slides, and Google+. Marlboro users should consider the following general issues when using Google Apps For Education.

  • Google Apps logins are pervasive across all Google content and remain in effect until you Sign Out: When you sign into YouTube, you are also logged in to Google’s mail, calendar, map, and news applications. Google’s search engine will tie your searches to your identity – that’s great if you’re trying to remember arcane search criteria, but not helpful if you’ve forgotten to sign off from a publicly accessible computer. You need to sign out after using apps in order to be ensure that a password is requested next time. As such you should not use Apps from any computer or device not owned by Marlboro College and password protected if you work with confidential data.
  • You can work with multiple Apps accounts in the same browser, but if you do, caution should be used to avoid data mismanagement.
  • If you sign into one App on your browser or device you sign into all apps.
  • Google Apps is FERPA compliant. However, you must be follow of FERPA guidelines and best practices.
  • Marlboro has worked with Google to insure letter-of-the-law HIPPA compliance. However, due to general security issues Google Apps SHOULD NOT be used for health information without arrangements with IT to insure security. (For example, though a Google calendar is technically “HIPPA Compliant,” nothing stops you from adding private information to it, or sharing that calendar with someone who shouldn’t see it.)
  • Google Apps should not be used for secure data.

Gmail Specific Issues

Email in general is not considered to be a secure medium and should never be used for secure data with the possible exception of encrypted files. Email sent to another @marlboro.edu address stays on Google and Marlboro servers and can be considered confidential as long as both you and the other users are following best practices (e.g. not auto-forwarding Marlboro mail to another account). However, confidential data should not be sent to an address in another domain as confidentiality cannot be assured.

Google Drive/Docs Specific Issues

The biggest pitfall with Google Drive is that it’s easy to accidentally share documents with the wrong people. Documents stored on Google Drive cannot be given the same fine grained permissions that IT can assign to documents saved on Marlboro servers. Thus extreme care needs to be taken with confidential data; secure data should not be stored on Google Drive at all. When you share documents, unless they are public data, be very careful with whom you share them – particularly when sharing with addresses out of the marlboro.edu domain. If you are simultaneously logged into your personal Gmail account and your Marlboro account be sure to double check the current logged-in address in the upper right corner before starting a new document with Marlboro information or uploading something to your drive.

Internship/Field Study

Internship

An internship is defined as an experiential opportunity connected to a student’s field of study and is linked to an internship tutorial with papers or projects that document learning. Internships will be identified as such on the student’s transcript.

Credit for internships is only granted through internship tutorials as determined in collaboration with the faculty sponsor, not only for the hours spent in the field. Credit for internships is typically available for SO2s through SR2s and for up to 8 credits over the student’s career at Marlboro.

Students must submit the Internship Proposal Form during registration which will outline the learning outcomes of the internship, the type of duties that will be performed at the site and how the internship experience will be evaluated. (Instructions for registering and obtaining credit are available in the Registrar’s Office.)

Faculty are encouraged to visit with site supervisors to discuss expectations, scope of work and time commitments. Feedback from organization/sponsor should be solicited as part of the grading process. The Office of Career Development is available to assist with any contact with the site placements.

Field Study

Field study is defined as independent research away from an academic setting, not necessarily in connection with an organization or job. The student may gather data or conduct interviews, for example. Field Study can add a valuable “real world” perspective on theoretical issues in a Plan of Concentration.

Like all education at Marlboro, emphasis is on the independent, self-designed aspect of the internship or field of study. In most cases, students leave campus for a semester in order to have a significant amount of time for learning in the field. Students are expected to find their own placements with advice from the Director of International Services, the Director of Career Development and faculty sponsors. The College maintains files of internship possibilities, reference materials, and copies of past Absentia #1 internship proposals in the World Studies Program (WSP) office. Resources are also available from the Career Development Office. The courses Finding an Internship and Designing Fieldwork, are open to all students and can help with the internship search and design process.

Because of the level of independence and self-motivation required, Absentia #1 is recommended only for students on Plan. Arrangements for identifying a work site and getting faculty approval for independent research take a great deal of time—up to one year in some cases—so students should plan early if they are interested in doing off-campus research.

Absentia #1 internships and field study may be designed for any length of time and up to two semesters’ worth of credit. Students who want academic credit for their internships or fieldwork must submit a written proposal to the faculty sponsor(s), who will evaluate the work and award credit. Instructions for registering and obtaining credit are available in the Registrar’s Office.

Interpreters and Captioning Services

At the request of students who are deaf, the OAS will provide a CART reporter or sign language interpreters. Students are requested to provide current documentation and to meet with the OAS Coordinator to discuss course information. As it can take time to make these arrangements, student should make contact as soon as possible after enrollment. Students must notify the OAS if he/she is unable to attend class so the interpreter or CART reporter can be cancelled.

Introduction

Marlboro College recognizes the importance of providing time off for rest and relaxation, to address emergencies, to attend to personal responsibilities or cope with illness or bereavement. This policy identifies the categories, amounts of paid time off available to eligible employees, and provides guidelines for its use. “Paid time off” refers collectively to all types of paid days off, such as vacation, sick, personal, holiday, etc. Supervisors shall strive to ensure that paid time off provides flexibility for staff members to handle emergencies, weather conditions and personal needs. Staff members shall make every effort to request paid time off as far in advance as possible, recognizing that in some circumstances it may be impossible to schedule discretionary time off due to the needs of the department and the College. Both parties should work together in these situations to find the most reasonable compromise between the needs of the individual and the institution.

Jury and Witness Duty Leave

The College recognizes your civic duty to serve on a jury or as a court witness. Jury and witness duty leave are available to staff members meeting the eligibility requirements and according to the calculations in the “Eligibility and Calculations” subsection above. If you are absent from work because you have been summoned to serve on a jury or have been required by subpoena to appear as a witness, the College will pay the difference between any stipends from the court and your regular pay. You will be required to submit your jury summons and evidence of payment. This benefit does not apply when a staff member appears in court as a plaintiff or defendant. Regardless of whether or not you are eligible for pay for jury or witness duty leave, you must notify your supervisor as soon as possible of any requirement to be absent from work to appear in court. If the court does not require your attendance for a full day or full-time, then you are expected to return to work whenever you are not required to be present in court.

Keys

You will be issued keys, access tools, fobs, and/or swipe cards to buildings and offices as necessary for the performance of your duties by the office of plant and operations. When issued, you will be personally responsible for the safekeeping of those keys. You will be further responsible for returning the keys when you no longer need those for the performance of your duties or at the conclusion of your employment. Employees are strictly prohibited from duplicating College keys or loaning their keys to any other person. Keys lost or stolen must be reported to plant operations promptly.

Laundry Facilities

Washing machines and dryers are located in the Dining Hall basement, Random South, Schrader, All- the-Way, Howland, Marlboro North and Out of the Way. Detergent is sold in the College Bookstore. Please report problems with machines to the Plant & Operations Office.

Leave of Absence (beyond FMLA)

If you are a staff member who has worked for the College for at least three years, you are eligible to apply for an unpaid leave of absence for a period of up to two years. Leave requests must be submitted in writing at least four months before the requested leave is to begin. Your immediate supervisor may grant the leave with approval of the president, and contingent upon finding an appropriate temporary replacement. The College will make every reasonable effort to find an adequate replacement. If the College cannot find a replacement, the leave of absence may be denied or postponed.

When a staff member is on leave, Marlboro College will continue contributions toward insurance at the regular employer cost. Arrangements for payment of the employee contributions must be made in advance with the senior financial management officer. The College will also maintain and pay for long-term disability income insurance and group term life insurance during the leave period.

Leaves Without Pay

After three years of service, regular faculty members may apply for leaves of absence without pay for periods of up to two years. Application for such leaves must be made to the President, who in granting such leaves will consult with the Dean of Faculty and the Committee on Faculty. This is to insure that the granting of such leave will not jeopardize the teaching program at the College. Normally, requests for such leaves must be made at least one semester before the semester during which the leave will commence.

Legislative Responsibilities

Jointly with the President, the faculty is responsible to the Board of Trustees for maintaining proper order at the College. In general, the faculty legislates and the President administers. It is understood that the President and faculty traditionally delegate to the Town Meeting much of their authority to maintain proper order.

Authority not specifically delegated remains with the President and the faculty. Once delegated, authority cannot be withdrawn except by formal action of the faculty or the Board of Trustees. Before taking effect, organic changes in the delegated powers must be reported to the Board of Trustees by the President, but functional changes not altering the principle or substance of the delegated powers need not be.

Library

The Rice Library opened in January 1965 and the Aron Library Wing in September 2003. Combined, they total 22,500 square feet and offer a variety of seating and study spaces, as well as the Computer Lab, Writer’s Block, and the Center for Experiential Learning and Global Engagement.

Hours

Marlboro College community members have exclusive 24/7 access to the Library during the academic year. The majority of materials are checked out by users on a honor-based self-checkout system. The library staff is dedicated to maintaining both our hours of access and our honor system for checkout. Your cooperation is necessary to continue this policy. For building hours during intersession times, see the library homepage.

Staff

The Library staff consists of the Library Director, the Reference & Technology Librarian, and the Technical Services Librarian.

Research Help

Library staff are available to work with students and faculty on their research and information needs. Help is available through a variety of formats:

  • Drop-in help: During the academic year, library staff are available at the Service Desk weekdays from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm and Sundays from 12:30 - 5:30 pm. Student workers staff the library Sunday-Thursday evenings from 6:30 - 11:00 pm. See the Library website for current Service Desk schedule.

  • Research Consultations: Email library@marlboro.edu or call x221 (802-258-9221) to set up an appointment with a librarian.

  • Virtual help: email library@marlboro.edu or call x221 (802-258-9221).

Collections

Physical

The library houses approximately 90,000 items, primarily books, but also films, audio books, and hundreds of journals. Special Collections & Archives include Plans of Concentration from past years and the Rudyard Kipling Collection.

Digital

The Library website is your portal to tens of thousands of online journals, over 125,000 full-text ebooks, dozens of research databases, and more. Off-campus access to most online resources is available to current campus community members only. For off-campus access, log in with your Marlboro username and password when prompted. Subject and course-based research guides provide starting points for research in most areas of study taught at Marlboro.

Equipment

The library lends several types of equipment, including digital projectors, speakers, headphones, and digital audio recorders. These items circulate for 3 days and are available on a first-come, first-served basis

Loan Periods

The loan period is one semester for most materials except films, course reserves, and equipment. Materials may be renewed as long as they are not needed by another user. The library reserves the right to recall any item that is needed by another user. Borrowers are responsible for returning recalled items within 10 days of the recall notice.

Reserves

The reserve collection is shelved in the AV/Reserve Room on the ground floor. The items from this collection must be checked out prior to their removal from this room. The check-out period is 3 hours or overnight for items checked out one hour before the closing of the Reserve Room. Return reserve items to library staff or place them in library return bins. Please be considerate of other members of the community by observing these important rules.

Interlibrary Loan

Librarians are happy to work with you to arrange access to the information you need for your research. Materials not owned by the Rice-Aron Library may be obtained from other libraries through a process called interlibrary loan. Requests may be placed via a form on the library website.

Smoking

Smoking is prohibited in all areas of the library.

Life Threatening Emergency

Step 1

Dial 911. The 911 System is linked to fire, rescue and police departments.

Step 2

  • During Business Hours – Dial *611 (Monday-Friday 8:30am-4:30pm). This will contact the on-campus emergency personnel. Callers should report the location and description of the emergency, and that 911 was called.
  • During Non-Business Hours, Weekends & Holidays – Page the SLC at 877.730.6051 (4:30pm-8:30am weekdays and all day on weekends and holidays). Please report the location, description of the emergency, and that 911 was called.

Limits of Relationships with Students

Faculty members may not engage in sexual relations or romantic relationships with students.

Marlboro College will not tolerate the corruption of professional standards, authority, and duties by such relationships. This may be grounds for dismissal from the College. Complaints should be brought to the attention of the Committee on Faculty. (Also see the Discrimination and Harassment and Sexual Misconduct sections of this Handbook.)

While both parties may consider the relationship a matter of mutual consent, the imbalance of power and authority and the potential for manipulation and misunderstanding inherent in such relationships can undermine the freedom and equity of the academic setting. All members of the Marlboro College community should be aware that initial consent to a sexual relationship does not preclude the potential for charges of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or sexual assault should consent be withdrawn by either party.

Limits of Staff Relationships with Students

Staff members may not engage in sexual relations or romantic relationships with students.

Marlboro College will not tolerate the corruption of professional standards, authority, and duties by such relationships. This may be grounds for dismissal from the College. Complaints should be brought to the attention of the human resources office. (Also see the Discrimination and Harassment and Sexual Misconduct sections of the College Handbook.)

While both parties may consider the relationship a matter of mutual consent, the imbalance of power and authority and the potential for manipulation and misunderstanding inherent in such relationships can undermine the freedom and equity of the academic setting. All members of the Marlboro College community should be aware that initial consent to a sexual relationship does not preclude the potential for charges of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or sexual assault should consent be withdrawn by either party.

Lines of Succession

Should the President and the Dean of Faculty be unavailable, the President may designate an acting head of the College. If no such designation has been made, the tenured member with the longest service on the faculty will act as head of the College and preside at Faculty Meeting.

Academic and Administrative Responsibilities: All faculty members are responsible to the President and the Dean of Faculty for their work in course, for submitting course descriptions and evaluations of students’ work when called for (in accordance with such forms and standards as the faculty have approved), and for meeting their own classes as scheduled (see also Professional Responsibilities below).

Loan Entrance/Exit Counseling

Federal regulations require that students borrowing a Federal Direct Subsidized/unsubsidized loan for the first time at Marlboro college complete entrance counseling. Direct loan entrance couseling can be completed online at www.studentloans.gov. Entrance counseling explains your rights and responsibilities when borrowing a federal loan.

Federal regulations are also require that students exiting Marlboro College by way of graduation, withdrawal, leave of absence, absentia or, students who have dropped below 6 credits and, who have borrowed a Directloan, complete exit counseling. Exit counseling can be completed at www.studentloans.gov. Exit counseling explains your rights and responsibilities for repayment of your Federal Direct Loan.

Long-Term Disability

If you are unable to work after 90 days of recovery from sickness or injury, long–term disability insurance benefits are available to eligible employees. You are eligible after 30 days from date of hire as a regular or academic-calendar staff member working at least 30 hours per week. This premium is paid in full by the College; the eligible employee does not contribute to the plan. The policy provides an amount equal to 60% of basic earnings, not to exceed a maximum monthly benefit of $6,500.00, in the event of a long-term disability. The benefit is payable after 90 days of continuous absence from work due to a disability that results from a qualifying sickness or injury. Special terms and restrictions apply. Please contact the human resources office to enroll in the plan or for more information. For more details, consult the plan documents.

Marlboro College Course Credit or Class Audit

Full-time, regular employee, after twelve months of employment are eligible to enroll in up to six credits, excluding tutorials, either at the undergraduate or graduate campus each term without charge. Enrollment in those courses is based on the following provisions:

  • Permission from the dean of faculty for undergraduate courses or permission from the associate dean of the Graduate School for courses at the Graduate School.
  • Available space in the classes. In determining space availability, priority for enrollment in classes will be given to tuition-paying students.
  • Only one academic course per semester may be scheduled to meet during the course of your standard work schedule. The amount of scheduled work time missed may not exceed three hours per week and any amount of work time missed must be made up during the same pay period.
  • Completion of the Employee Education Benefit Application and submission of the completed application to the Student Accounts Office at least 30 days before the beginning of the academic term in which the class(es) you intend to enroll is(are) offered.
  • The College reserves the right to limit the aggregate cost for courses that will be funded each term by the Employee Education Benefit. In the event that the College exercises the option to limit the total cost of the courses funded by the Employee Education Benefit, employee enrollment in courses will typically be first limited to one course per employee and authorized on the basis of employee seniority as determined by date of hire. If funding remains after all interested employees have enrolled in one class, on the basis of seniority employees may enroll in a second course until funding for this benefit for that term is exhausted.
  • In special circumstances permission to enroll in classes may be extended to employees who would not otherwise be eligible to enroll in classes due to seniority or space. That permission will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the chief human resources officer and the dean of the faculty or associate dean of the Graduate School.

Marlboro College Free Tuition Benefit for Family Members

As a member of the Marlboro College community, you understand the value of a Marlboro education and may also want to share this unique academic opportunity with your family. Subject to the admissions process, immediate family members of regular staff members are eligible to enroll in as many as 18 credits each semester or trimester without charge, except for special course fees stipulated in the catalog. Immediate family members of regular staff may also enroll in individual classes, without charge, subject to space availability in the class and approval of the dean of faculty for undergraduate courses and the associate dean of the Graduate School for graduate courses.

Marlboro Grant

If a student has need as determined by the College’s financial aid policy and if the student’s need cannot be met by campus employment and/or other means, Marlboro College may supplement a portion of need with a Marlboro Grant.

Master Promissory Note

Students who were awarded and are accepting the Federal Direct Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized loans, must complete the loan agreement. This loan agreement, know as the Master Promissory Note (MPN), must be completed online at www.studentloans.gov.

Master’s Degree

Although Marlboro College’s facilities and resources are limited, our capacity for accommodating the individual interests of strong, independent students, and the particular interest and circumstances of some members of the faculty have occasionally made it reasonable for the College to offer a Master’s degree. These regulations clarify the conditions and requirements under which Marlboro will grant a Master’s degree.

The Marlboro program for the Master’s is designed to supplement and support the College’s mission in undergraduate education, rather than to be an independent program in its own right. The steps outlined below are designed to enable those members of the faculty for whom working with Master’s-level students would represent an opportunity for professional development to do so; these steps in no way confer an obligation upon any member of the faculty to offer Master’s level study.

Program Regulations

  1. Applicants to the Marlboro Master’s program must first write a letter of inquiry to the Dean of Faculty, stating their general interests and background and including a copy of their transcripts.
  2. Through consultation with the Dean of Faculty, the applicant must next find a Marlboro faculty sponsor and co-sponsor to serve on his or her Graduate Committee. The applicant must then submit transcripts, letters of recommendation, writing samples, proposed general course of study, and any other information deemed relevant by the faculty sponsors and the Dean of Faculty. After consulting with other faculty members in their area, the sponsors and the Dean may admit the applicant as a candidate.
  3. With the sponsors’ aid and approval, the candidate must secure from outside the College a third Graduate Committee member, who is an expert in the proposed field of study and whose position or experience qualifies him or her to evaluate Master’s-level work, and who is willing to serve as an Outside Examiner in the final evaluation of the candidate’s work. The outside member of the Graduate Committee may change, with the approval of the sponsors and the Dean of Faculty, as appropriate to developments in the candidate’s work.
  4. Preferably before study begins, but in any case no later than mid-term of the first term of study, the candidate, together with the sponsors, develops a detailed, coherent, and rigorous course of study, which the Committee certifies in writing as appropriate for Master’s-level work. The sponsors circulate the proposed course of study among colleagues in their area or in any related area in which the candidate is likely to study, for comment.
  5. The candidate submits to the Curriculum Committee a description of the proposed course of study, including the field of study and area of the degree; a description of proposed courses, tutorials, and teaching; a description of the thesis and any major related papers; an overall statement of purpose; and supporting letters from the Graduate Committee, including the outside member.

Letters from the Marlboro members of the Committee should comment not only on the appropriateness and feasibility of the course of study, but also upon their own professional interest in supervising it; the outside member should indicate in particular his or her own expected role. The Curriculum Committee reviews the proposal to insure its rigor and that it can be accomplished in a reasonable period, normally from one-and-a-half to three years.

  1. The proposal is then circulated to the faculty, for at least two weeks, with the supporting materials on file for interested faculty members. Faculty members may address comments or objections to the sponsors and the Dean of Faculty; if there are no unresolved objections to the proposal after two weeks, the proposal is considered accepted. Changes in the program of study must be reported to the Dean of Faculty; for major shifts in the program or a change of sponsor, the Dean may require resubmission and re-approval.

Program Requirements

  • Candidates must have completed a BA/BS degree or its equivalent, as attested by official transcripts from the other institution/s.
  • In general, the program of study is defined as 30 credits of course work (in residence) followed by one or two semesters in preparation of the thesis.
  • All work toward the Master’s, whether done independently, in tutorial, or in regular Marlboro courses, is evaluated according to standards appropriate to graduate work, as determined by the sponsors. Courses and tutorials within the plan of study must be passed with grades of B or higher.
  • The program of study must include a comprehensive examination appropriate to the field, normally taken at the end of the second semester in residence. The candidate must ordinarily pass examinations in a foreign language, or math, or technical subjects, as appropriate to the field.
  • The entire program, including thesis and examinations, is evaluated at the end of the program in an oral examination by the candidate’s Graduate Committee.

Fees: Tuition during each term of Master’s work, whether in residency or in thesis preparation, is paid at the rate of 83% of regular, undergraduate tuition. Financial aid is generally available. Some Master’s candidates may serve as interns or teaching assistants, but such arrangements are not assumed to be part of the Master’s program and must be arranged.

Meals and Dining Hall Duty

When you are on campus at mealtime in pursuit of your duties, you are entitled to that meal without charge. This privilege is extended to members of your family only at Community Dinners. Additional meals may be paid for in the dining hall. All members of the College community are expected to participate once per year in dining hall duty. This requires that you are present at the conclusion of lunch for about ten to fifteen minutes to tidy the dining hall, clear and wipe tables, transport compost to the farm, and put up chairs. Dining hall duty assignments are made by the crew chief, a community member hired by the Select Board to coordinate dining hall duty. The assignments are made at the beginning of the school year and are posted in the dining hall on a bulletin board as well as the daily Town Crier email. Exceptions to dining hall duty and rescheduling of dining hall duty may be made at the discretion of the dining hall crew chief. Failure to makeup a shift may subject you to a penalty of 10 hours of community service. Please read Article VI, Dining Hall, in the Community Constitution for more information on dining hall duty.

Meeting Attendance

All faculty members, unless exempted or specifically excused, are expected to attend Faculty Meetings. They must also attend meetings of committees to which they are elected or assigned, commencements, and other formal occasions.

Meeting Schedule

Official Faculty Meetings are normally scheduled every two to three weeks during the academic year. However, special meetings may be called by the President, by the acting chairman of the faculty, or upon formal petition by five faculty members. Notice of special meetings must be given at least 24 hours in advance during the semester, and two weeks in advance when the College is not in session.

Missing Student Policy and Protocol

Anyone who believes a student to be missing for a period exceeding 24 hours should immediately report their concern to the Dean of Students (802.258.9238), the Director of Housing & Residential Life (802.258.9232) or a Student Life Coordinator (877.730.6051). Any report of a missing student will be fully investigated by appropriate personnel under the coordination of the Dean of Students. In order to determine if a student is missing, College officials will check a student’s card access records, class attendance, student residence, and use other methods to determine the status of a missing student. Marlboro College will notify appropriate local law enforcement agencies not later than 24-hours after the time a student is determined to be missing. If the student has designated an emergency contact person, the College will notify that individual as well.

Note for students under age of 21: Suzanne’s Law requires law enforcement to notify the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) when someone between the age of 18 and 21 is reported missing, as part of the national “Amber Alert” bill. This Federal law is named for Suzanne Lyall, a State University of New York at Albany student who has been missing since 1998.

In compliance with the Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act, federal law, 20 U.S.C § 1092j, a student may identify an individual to be contacted by the College not later than twenty-four (24) hours after the time circumstances indicate that the student may be missing. The student should notify the Emergency Contact that he or she has been designated as an Emergency Contact. For students under age eighteen (18) and not emancipated, Marlboro is required to notify the custodial parent not later than twenty-four (24) hours after the time the student is determined to be missing.

Motor Vehicles

The authority of the Community government covers most regulations of a social nature. However, the administration explicitly reserves the right to regulate firearms, vehicles and internal combustion engines. These regulations stand in addition to any of the Town Meeting rules.

Regulations for parking and operating motor vehicles on the Marlboro campus are set out in Article III of the Marlboro College Bylaws. Please note the two-vehicle rule, the speed limit, and the regulations on bumper stickers. Also note rules on the disposal of “dead cars” and motorcycles.

Every student who brings a motor-propelled vehicle to College must register that vehicle, with the Plant & Operations Office within 48 hours, and have proof of the following when he or she arrives for academic registration:

  • a valid driver’s license,
  • correct registration of vehicle,
  • a valid state inspection sticker,
  • proof of insurance.

The College sets minimum insurance limits for operation of a motor vehicle on the College campus. These minimum limits are:

  1. Liability for bodily injury: $20,000 each person; $40,000 each accident, and property damage: $10,000, or
  2. Combined single limit coverage of $50,000.

A two-week grace period will be allowed on vehicle inspection. College registration stickers must be placed on the rear of each registered automobile or motorcycle.

All vehicle operators must obey posted speed limits and restrictions, as directed by the Director of Plant & Operations. Motor vehicles parked so as to impede maintenance operations, including the plowing of snow, may be towed at the owner’s expense.

Motorcycles

Motorcycles at Marlboro exist on sufferance of the College Community and Administration. They can be annoying to local residents off campus, and they are hazardous to careless or unskilled operators. Therefore, college motorcyclists have a social obligation to ensure that all cycles registered with the College are operated responsibly. Cyclists are urged to read and adhere to the following regulations:

Any motorcycle at Marlboro must be insured according to college-approved limits, and must have passed inspection. To do this, the motorcycle must be registered.

In order to preserve the general student privileges of owning and operating a motorcycle at Marlboro, every cyclist is urged to proceed from the College to Route 9 and from Route 9 to the College in a careful manner, producing a minimum of noise, proceeding at a modest rate of speed, and keeping an eye peeled for children, other pedestrians, and pets.

Helmets, strongly advised by Marlboro medical authority, are an essential element of personal safety. Every motorcyclist is advised to own a helmet as a condition for maintaining a motorcycle at Marlboro, and to wear it while riding. Note that Vermont law requires the wearing of motorcycle helmets on all public roads. See Marlboro College Bylaws, Article III, for regulations.

Scrambling, testing, and off-road racing are a source of noise, irritation and minor damage to the land. These activities are to be removed from campus and conducted in abandoned fields or isolated wood roads where they do not damage property or disturb bystanders. Motorcycles should not be operated on private property without the consent of the property owner.

Failure to comply with the College motorcycle policy will result in the suspension of a student’s right to own or operate a motorcycle at Marlboro College.

Mopeds, motorbikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are subject to, at a minimum, all restrictions listed above for motorcycles. Mopeds, motorbikes, and snowmobiles must be registered, insured and inspected. Note: Three-wheeled all-terrain vehicles may not be operated on Marlboro College property at any time.

Musical Instrument Instruction

Individual instruction in musical instruments (including voice) is provided by the Brattleboro Music Center (BMC) and the Vermont Jazz Center (VJC). Fees are paid directly to the Centers.

Full-time students may receive credit for music lessons taken at the Brattleboro Music Center and/or Vermont Jazz Center as long as they include the lessons as a Marlboro College Tutorial on the Course Registration Form. Exceptions for part-time students may be made by the Dean of Faculty.

If students wish to include BMC or VJC music study as part of the Plan of Concentration, they must secure approval in advance from College music faculty.

All academic regulations listed on the official Marlboro College web site, including those for Incompletes, apply to courses taken for credit at the BMC/VJC. If students wish to drop BMC lessons, they must submit drop slips to the Registrar by the posted deadline in effect for all courses. If lessons are dropped but no slip is submitted, the instructor will assign a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing). Students must attend a minimum of nine (9) half-hour lessons, or the equivalent, to receive a passing grade.

The BMC/VJC will not submit grades to the College unless a student has paid for lessons. If no grade is submitted for this reason, the course will be entered on the permanent record with no credit (“NC”) given.

A Plan student in music may be reimbursed for one credit per semester (typically one-half hour lesson per week) of private instrumental instruction by Marlboro if the following conditions are met:

  1. A major component of the student’s Plan is in performance on that instrument with at least two recitals in the senior year;
  2. The instrumental instructor has been approved by the music department;
  3. The student has demonstrated a desire and ability to perform in previous years (through performances, concerts, etc.);
  4. Reimbursement is given retroactively. Reimbursement shall be given only after the student has successfully completed work each semester (C- or better).

Mutual Respect Policy/Anti-Harassment

Marlboro College is committed to preserving an environment conducive to academic and professional excellence. This can only exist when every community member actively promotes an atmosphere of mutual respect. This policy is not intended to inhibit the free and open exchange of ideas, essential to Marlboro College’s principles, but rather to provide all community members the respect that will encourage their positive and honest participation.

Harassment is defined as any type of behavior that is so severe or pervasive that it interferes with an individual’s work or academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work or academic environment. Harassment may include any unwanted physical contact; use of epithets, inappropriate jokes, comments or innuendos; obscene or harassing telephone calls, e-mails, letters, notes or other forms of communication. Harassment in any form is against the policies of Marlboro College and in many cases, it is also illegal under state and federal law.

Those found to have violated this policy will be subject to corrective action up to and including termination of employment. Harassment complaints regarding a staff member should be reported to the compliance coordinator (senior human resource officer), who will initiate an investigation of the complaint. Upon gathering all information relative to the harassment complaint, the human resources office will convene a committee according to step four of the grievance policy procedure. Should the committee find that harassment has occurred; the human resources office and the individual’s supervisor will apply discipline according to the corrective action policy. Retaliation against an individual who complains of harassment under this policy is strictly prohibited. Intentionally making a false accusation of harassment is also strictly prohibited.

Certain kinds of treatment based on gender, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or veteran status are also covered under the Marlboro College non-discrimination policy. Please refer to this policy in the appendix if the harassment is relative to employment or employment decisions.

Named Scholarships

The Marlboro College faculty annually awards a number of endowed and annually-funded scholarships to returning students. These scholarships require financial need and recognize academic excellence; some have additional criteria. Yearly awards are made by the faculty based on recommendations from the Faculty Committee on Prizes and Scholarships.

Recipients must be full-time matriculated students, eligible for Marlboro Grant during the award period. The Scholarship will be integrated into the financial aid package such that 100% of the award will offset Marlboro Grant.

National Student Clearinghouse

Marlboro College has authorized the National Student Clearinghouse to act as its agent for all degree and enrollment verifications for the Marlboro campus. Please visit the Clearinghouse online at www.studentclearinghouse.org or contact them by phone at 703-742-4200.

 

Non-Disclosure/Confidentiality

The protection of confidential information is vital to the success of Marlboro College as well as the interests of students, faculty and employees. Confidential information includes, but is not limited to: grades, counseling and health records, compensation data, financial information, personnel/payroll records and certain conversations between persons associated with the institution.

Please be sensitive to the safeguarding of confidential information. Employees who improperly use or disclose confidential information will be subject to corrective action, including termination, even if they do not personally benefit from the disclosed information.

Non-Life Threatening Emergency

Step 1

  • During Business Hours – Dial *611 (Monday-Friday 8:30am-4:30pm) Callers should report the location and description of the emergency.
  • During Non-Business Hours, Weekends& Holidays – Page the SLC at 877.730.6051 (4:30pm-8:30am weekdays and all day on weekends and holidays) Callers should report the location and description of the emergency.

Non-Tenured Evaluation

Purpose: To provide fuller and more substantial information on which to base tenure decisions. To a large extent, the burden for ensuring that the faculty has means to judge performance is borne by the faculty member being reviewed, so that the faculty member has considerable discretion in determining how to provide the basis for such judgment.

  1. Descriptions of what is expected of faculty members in order to receive tenure are contained in Criteria for Faculty Evaluation in the Handbook.
  2. Each non-tenured faculty member is expected to provide a short written evaluation of each course taught, at its conclusion. Forms will be provided, but faculty members may provide evaluations on their own forms.
  3. Each non-tenured faculty member should ensure that some other faculty members are in a position to have first-hand information on the non-tenured member’s teaching. This can be accomplished by co-teaching courses, inviting colleagues to sit in on classes, participating in colleagues’ classes, taping classes, making public presentations, participating on examining committees, co-sponsoring Plans, and so on.
  4. New faculty members are expected, within the first few years at Marlboro, to give public presentations of their work. This might include performances, exhibitions, lectures on research or teaching, or presentations to WSP Colloquium, alumni, families, etc. The goal is to provide evidence of professional activity and to enrich the intellectual and artistic life of the community. The activity can be on or off campus, it can include publications and performances; and at least one should be accessible to the College community.
  5. Written self-evaluation at the time of formal reviews is expected. Not every item need be addressed in early reviews, and the first submission may be updated for further reviews. Some of the items may be addressed in an expanded curriculum vitae or in materials submitted during hiring. By the tenure review, the self-evaluation should address, at a minimum, the following items:
          • Curriculum. Description of curriculum, including courses, their content and rotation, and areas where tutorials are offered or would be considered. This should compare the candidate’s curriculum to that of other liberal arts colleges. Providing syllabi would be helpful. It should include descriptions of links to other areas and faculty members, including any co-taught courses, guest lectures, or other collaborations.
          • Teaching. Description of teaching philosophy, including any innovative teaching methods. An evaluation of teaching successes and failures, including an assessment of relevant Plan issues. This could include a critique of the teaching environment and what might be done to make teaching more effective.
          • Professional Development, Scholarship, Public Service. Description of contributions to the intellectual, artistic, and social life of the College. Description of contributions outside the College, including public service, professional meetings, scholarly or artistic works, and continuing education or technical training.
          • For each of the above categories, provide a description of any difficulties that have been or need to be resolved, and make an assessment of what challenges you intend to address in the future.

Note takers

Students requesting note takers must meet with the Assistant Dean and provide appropriate documentation to be considered for note taking services. If approved for this accommodation, the ODS will generate a note taker request letter which the student will hand deliver to each professor. The letter will ask the instructor to make an announcement in class that there is a student requesting a note taker and that anyone interested should contact the OAS. Students should advise the OAS if they prefer that their identity be kept confidential. Arrangement for pick up of notes will be made on a case-by-case basis. Notetakers are provided as a necessary accommodation, and are not considered a substitute for full participation in the course. Failure to attend class regularly may result in discontinuation of services.

Notice of Nondiscrimination

Marlboro College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its education programs and activities, and Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, as amended (“Title IX”), as well as applicable state law, require that it not discriminate in such a manner. Prohibited sex discrimination includes sexual harassment and sexual misconduct as outlined in this Policy. Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX may be referred to the College’s Title IX Coordinator (see below) or to the United States Department of Education Office for Civil Rights. The OCR Region I office’s contact information is: Office for Civil Rights, Boston Office, U.S. Department of Education, 8th Floor, 5 Post Office Square, Boston, MA 02109-3921; Telephone, 617-289-0111; facsimile, 617-289-0150.

Nuclear Disaster/Attack

Step 1

  • The Crisis Alert Notification System will be enacted. Instructions will follow.

Step 2

  • Evacuate to Dining Hall and Persons Auditorium. Once the assembly/shelter areas are filled, maintenance and security personnel will lock and attempt to seal doors and windows with duct tape and plastic. The HVAC system will be turned off and the dampers will be closed. Each assembly/shelter area is equipped with a medical/emergency supply kit. No one will leave the shelter areas until the president or designee has told you to leave.

Outdoor and Recreation Programs

The Outdoor and Recreation Programs try to combine activities for advanced athletes, for novices, and for those who simply like to be outside. All events are planned by the Director of the Program and the Athletic Committee. As with the social life at Marlboro, the types of activities from year to year are often determined by student interest and enthusiasm. On most fall weekends there are rock-climbing, hiking, or canoeing trips headed by the Program’s Director, as well as short afternoon hikes. Volleyball, soccer, basketball, ultimate frisbee are organized as on-campus activities and soccer and basketball as competition with other schools. Cross-country and down-hill skiing, ice skating, ice climbing, and winter camping are all offered through the Outdoor/Recreation Program during the winter months. The College provides cross-country skiing equipment to those interested, in addition to informal lessons or clinics and local trail orientation. For down-hill skiers, Mount Snow, Berkshire East, Haystack, and Stratton Mountain ski resorts are within a fifty-five minute drive of the College. An annual all campus Broomball tournament in January is an event not to be missed.

For those who prefer to stay indoors, the College has a game room with ping-pong, foosball and pool tables, as well as an exercise room with a rowing machine, weights, and exercycle. A Town Meeting membership also provides access to the Colonial Spa in Brattleboro with pool, steam room, sauna and jacuzzi. In addition, a large indoor climbing gym is now in the Whittemore Theater. The facility is open on a schedule basis and at random hours contingent on the availability of trained volunteer wall monitors. Exercise and dance classes are offered almost daily in Brattleboro. During the warmer months, there are public tennis courts available at Living Memorial Park in West Brattleboro.

Parental Leave Policy

General Policy Provisions (Staff | Faculty)

All regular faculty and staff members who qualify for leave under the provisions of the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to give birth to a child, to care for a newborn child, or to receive and/or care for a newly-placed adopted or foster child may also qualify for some of the leave to be paid. Birth mothers who qualify for leave under the provisions of the FMLA may also qualify for the leave associated with childbirth to be paid under the provisions of the College’s short-term disability policy. Paid parental leave must conclude within 12 months after the birth or placement of the child.

To qualify for paid parental leave both faculty and staff members must have been employed by the College for at least 12 consecutive months; faculty members must have a permanent faculty appointment of half-time or more; and staff members must be permanent employees in positions scheduled for 30 or more hours per week, and must have worked at least 1,000 cumulative hours prior to the paid parental leave. In order to receive pay for parental leave employees must submit, to the extent practicable, a written request for parental leave at least 90 calendar days prior to the first prospective day of leave. Faculty members should submit requests for parental leave to the Dean of Faculty, and staff members should direct their requests to their supervisors. Extenuating circumstances that prevent the provision of 90 days’ advanced notice will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis taking into consideration the reasons why notice could not have been given earlier.

 Staff Provisions

Eligible staff members will receive up to four weeks of paid parental leave. Leave for staff members who work less than full time will be prorated on the basis of the employees’ standard work schedule. Staff members have the option of extending their paid parental leave by combining it with other available forms of paid leave allocated to eligible staff members: vacation, personal and sick leave. Specific arrangements for the use of additional paid leave in conjunction with paid parental leave must be established in advance by mutual agreement between staff members and their immediate supervisors. Under the provisions of the FMLA, staff members may also combine unpaid leave with paid parental leave. The total length of a period of parental leave will be subject to the maximum number of days allowed by the FMLA.

 Faculty Provisions

The policy for paid parental leave for the faculty differs from that for staff members in recognition that faculty members do not receive the several forms of paid leave extended to staff members, and in order to minimize disruption to the established academic schedule and to the studies of individual students. Eligible faculty members will receive paid parental leave of one semester’s duration as described below. The semester in which the leave occurs may be either the semester in which a child is born to or placed with the faculty member or the semester immediately following. Faculty members may elect to take their paid parental leave in one of the forms indicated below, all equivalent to ¼ paid time off:

  1. A reduction by ¼ of teaching duties with a continuation of their full salary for the semester. (Typically this will take the form of a course release).
  2. A reduction by ½ of teaching duties while receiving the equivalent of ¾ of their salary through the semester. (Normally, this would be a tutorials-only teaching schedule).
  3. Full leave with no teaching responsibilities with pay equivalent to ¼ of their salary for the semester.

Faculty may also be released from committee responsibilities for up to 12 weeks after the beginning of the leave. Because committee work is not always subject to the same semester-based time constraints as teaching, committee work may be suspended mid-semester. Specific arrangements for paid parental leave for faculty members shall be established in advance of the leave by mutual agreement between individual faculty members and the Dean of Faculty.

Parking

Students with disabilities requiring a parking permit for campus must provide documentation and contact the OAS as soon as possible.

Payroll Period and Pay Dates

Both non-exempt and exempt employees are paid on the same day, typically every other Thursday. On each payroll date, non-exempt employees are paid for the two-week payroll period ending the previous Friday. Exempt employees are paid for the two-week period ending on the Wednesday following the pay date. Exempt staff members in academic calendar positions may elect to be paid consistently throughout the 12 months of the calendar year, including during those periods when school is not in session and they are not expected to work.

Paychecks or remittance advices are typically available to you after 10:00 AM on paydays. Exceptions to this schedule will be noted on the annual payroll calendar, as described in the following section. All employees are encouraged to have their paychecks automatically deposited in their bank accounts by enrolling in the direct deposit program. If you choose direct deposit, you will receive a detailed payroll remittance notice instead of a paycheck.

Payroll Records

Marlboro College will only employ individuals legally eligible to work in the United States. Every employee must satisfactorily complete required verification forms and produce proof of citizenship or eligibility to work in the United States before starting work for the College.

As an employee of Marlboro College, you must also complete all required portions of IRS Form W-4 and submit the completed form to the human resources office prior to the completion of the first pay period in which you work. You must report any changes in eligibility to work to the human resources office in a timely manner. Current employees of the College may periodically be required to update their IRS Form W-4. Any employee that claims “exempt” on IRS Form W-4 must update the form annually.

Personal Time

Marlboro College offers personal time as paid days off for you to attend to home or community duties. Full-time staff members earn four personal days on their date of hire and on each anniversary of employment date thereafter. Personal time does not accrue; unused personal time from the previous year expires on each anniversary date. Unused personal time is not paid when a staff member’s employment with Marlboro College ends. Your personal time may be used if you are unable to attend work for personal reasons. Some examples of personal time use may include:

  • Attending a non-College Town Meeting or other civic engagements,
  • Staying at home to care for children in the event of an unscheduled school closing or failure in the continuity of childcare services,
  • Observation of a holiday not recognized by the College,
  • Inclement weather.

Personnel Records: Access, Accuracy and Changes

Access: Your personnel records are maintained in a secure file in the human resources office. Access to your personnel records is limited to you, your supervisor, the human resources office, the president and others with proper legal interest. Except where required by law, information contained in your personnel files will not be released to any other person without your consent. Employees may examine the contents of their personnel file by requesting an appointment with the human resources office. The human resource office will arrange a meeting time within seven (7) business days of the request. Supervisors are not permitted to keep personal information (such as social security numbers, copies of identification or W-4 and I-9 forms), but may keep contact information on their employees and any information relevant to their employees’ jobs, job descriptions and duties.

Accuracy of Employment Forms: We rely upon the accuracy of information contained in the employment application and other data presented throughout the hiring process and employment. Any misrepresentations, falsifications or material omissions in any of this information or data may result in corrective action.

Personnel Data Changes: Please notify the human resources department of any changes in your personal data such as mailing address, telephone numbers, name and number of dependents or beneficiaries, or individuals to be contacted in the event of an emergency by completing the Personal Information Change Form. Please notify the human resources department as soon as any change is official. Your personal data should be accurate and current at all times.

Pets

No pets are allowed on campus, except as noted in Article V of the Marlboro College Bylaws.

Photography

Marlboro College and its representatives occasionally take photographs for the college’s use in print and electronic publications. This serves as public notice of the college’s intent to do so and as a release to the college of permission to use such images as it deems fit. Students who object to the use of their photographs have the right to withhold release by filling out the Request to Prevent Disclosure of FERPA Directory Information form available online or by contacting the Registrar’s Office by the deadline for course registration.

Plan of Concentration

Credit and Residency Requirement

Definition

Field of Concentration

Preliminary Application

Final Plan Application

Work to be Evaluated & Proportional Weights

Grades, Junior Year

Grades, Senior Year

Tutorials with Non-Members of the Faculty

Oral Evaluation

Honorarium for Outside Evaluator

Duplication Costs

Written Evaluation

Senior Plan Written Assessment

Copy of the Work

Plan Grade

Satisfactory Progress

Unsatisfactory Progress

Extensions

Extension 1

Extension 2

Discontinuance

Reinstatement

Student-Taught Courses

  Credit and Residency Requirement

The Plan of Concentration consists of a minimum of 45 credits and a maximum of 60 credits. Plan credits typically will be advanced work in the student’s area(s) of study.

Normally, students are expected to be in residence during the senior year, although sponsors may occasionally recommend a non residential term. Such terms must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Students are required to register as full-time for the final senior semester.

  Definition

The Plan of Concentration is a two-year, coherent program of study of at least 45 credits, designed by each student in consultation with his or her faculty sponsor(s). The Plan allows students to develop a breadth of knowledge, depth of analysis, sophistication of perspective, and creativity of expression within some area of focus; unlike a traditional major, the coherence of a Plan need not be determined by disciplinary boundaries.

The first year of a Plan is typically devoted to courses, tutorials and associated research that constitute a foundation for the production of the Work by the end of the second year.

The Work represents the educational objectives achieved on Plan; its elements may include a major research paper or set of research papers, a presentation in the performing or creative arts, a set of written examinations on clearly defined topics, a public lecture, or any other effort appropriate to the focus of the Plan.

The elements of the Work are defined and assigned percentage weights on the Final Plan Application. These elements may be arranged and configured in various ways, but at least one element should be assigned a percentage larger than 25% (but less that 50%, except in conditions described below.) The Independent portion of the Work allows the student to demonstrate competence in the Plan area of focus, independent of faculty feedback or guidance. The Interdependent portion of the Work provides students an opportunity to demonstrate their ability to work and communicate with others in the service of meeting shared goals.

  Field of Concentration

The Field of Concentration specifies the area or areas for the Plan of Concentration. The Field of Concentration should be broad enough to encompass most or all components of the Plan of Concentration. It does not need to encompass the scope of a traditional major, although some areas of the study will look more like traditional majors than others. Additionally, each Plan will have a set of subfields that identify the narrower topics of student specialization. In choosing and describing their field, students may use several criteria:

In discussion with their Plan Sponsor(s), students will identify and describe their preferred Field(s) of Concentration. On the Preliminary and Final Plan Applications, students will provide a justification and description of how their chosen Field of Concentration functions as a coherent area of study. This will likely involve reading about how fields and concentrations work at other colleges and universities. In choosing and describing their field, students may use several criteria: There are several criteria that students should use when choosing and describing their field:

  • How does the Field of Concentration describe the student’s expertise to people outside of Marlboro College?
  • What is the body of scholarship that provides a foundation for their academic work?
  • What are the methodological backgrounds that inform the Field of Concentration?
  • What course and tutorial work will provide the basis for the student’s research?
  • Are there programs of study at other universities that the student can point to as an example?

Plans may use recognized categories to describe the field; the faculty specialties represent a list of easily definable fields [link]. For a list of other fields the faculty currently support well, click here.

The faculty member named on the first Plan application is the Plan Sponsor of record for administrative purposes. The primary Plan Sponsor should be appropriately related to the student’s field of concentration as described above. It is appropriate to have co-sponsors if other faculty members make major contributions to the Plan. Visiting faculty and retired members of the faculty may serve as Plan Sponsors only at the discretion of the Committee on Faculty, which may consult with faculty members in related disciplines.

The first year of the Plan normally concentrates on course work in the area of the Plan, leading to a precise definition of the Work at the end of the junior year. The senior year is usually spent in tutorials and independent work necessary for the Work. All current rules for good standing, satisfactory progress and academic probation apply to Plan students.

  Degree Field (valid for students who will be a JR1 or later in fall 2019)

The Degree Field indicates the area of concentration for Plan. A Plan must demonstrate both breadth and depth in addressing a problem or set of problems, but it need not necessarily encompass the scope of a traditional major. Plans integrating two (or more) degree fields may generally be regarded as constituting a single interdisciplinary field rather than a “double major”. However, each degree field listed requires a demonstrable engagement with that field’s materials and methods. Fields must be selected from the list of degree fields (see below) adopted by the Faculty. The degree field may be followed by descriptive specializations, e.g., ART HISTORY/Renaissance Painting; BIOLOGY/Ornithology; HISTORY and LITERATURE /Shakespeare. Students proposing a degree in LIBERAL STUDIES may, with the approval of their Plan sponsor(s), specify interdisciplinary concentrations such as Medieval Studies, Visual Studies, Latin American Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Organizational Studies.(Students considering Liberal Studies please use the new Field of Concentration model above.)

American Studies

Languages

Anthropology

Liberal Studies

Art History

Literature

Asian Studies

Mathematics

Astronomy

Music

Biochemistry

Painting

Biology

Philosophy

Ceramics

Photography

Chemistry

Physics

Computer Science

Politics

Cultural History

Psychology

Dance

Religion

Economics

Sculpture

Environmental Studies

Sociology

Film/Video Studies

Theater

Gender Studies

Visual Arts

History

Writing

 

In addition, World Studies Program students may select the following field:

Development Studies

Students who meet the requirements may also undertake a Plan in Liberal Studies.

The faculty member named first on the Plan application is the Plan sponsor of record for administrative purposes. It is appropriate to have co-sponsors if other faculty members make major contributions to the Plan. Visiting faculty and retired members of the faculty may serve as Plan sponsors only at the discretion of the Committee on the Faculty, which may consult with faculty members in related disciplines.

The first year of the Plan normally concentrates on course work in the area of the Plan, leading to a precise definition of the Work at the end of the junior year. The senior year is usually spent in tutorials and independent work necessary for the Work. All current rules for good standing, satisfactory progress and academic probation apply to Plan students.

  Preliminary Application

This Application serves as the student’s formal request for permission to embark on the first year of the Plan. The first year is normally devoted to courses which lay the foundation for the Work.

The deadline for submission of the Preliminary Plan Application is before the end of the semester in which the student will have earned 55 credits or more.

Any student who does not have a Preliminary Plan Application on file by the end of the semester in which he or she has earned 55 credits must, in the next semester, submit a Preliminary Plan Application at the time of registration. The Application must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Copies of the Preliminary Plan Application are then circulated so that faculty may register any misgivings.

  Final Plan Application

The Final Plan Application specifically defines the specifically defines the Field of Concentration, Descriptive Title, Abstract, and the various components of the Work (see Forms, Final Plan Application). It lists the courses and tutorials to be completed in the junior year and the courses and tutorials projected for the senior year. The deadline for submission and distribution of the Final Plan Application is two semesters prior to the anticipated date of completion of the Plan. Applications submitted at the end of the semester must be distributed to the faculty no later than two weeks before the final faculty meeting. Students who fail to submit Final Plan Applications on time may be required to spend an extra semester at Marlboro before they can graduate.

The Application must first be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Copies of the Final Plan Application are then circulated to all faculty for final approval.

  Work to be Evaluated & Proportional Weights

Technically, all work on Plan is subject to final evaluation. Typically, minor parts are not evaluated; they often provide essential background for the Work or papers, which are evaluated. Major elements must be evaluated: for example, if a student takes three tutorials in Irish History but writes a thesis on the Tudors, an examination or paper (listed under Other Plan Components) should be written on some aspect of Irish History.

Percentages assigned to Plan elements should be roughly consistent with the time spent on each element. Every Plan needs to meet the following (one component may fulfill more than one requirement):

  • One element should be weighted between 25% and 50%; a single element can exceed 50% (up to a maximum of 75%) only with written justification from the Primary Plan Sponsor and permission of the Dean of Faculty.
  • One element of the Work must consist of formal written prose and must comprise at least 20% of the weighting.
  • At least 10% of the material presented for evaluation must be in a form prepared by the student independently of faculty guidance, and all independent work must be available to the Outside Evaluator. Such independent work or examinations normally cover aspects of the major fields of study or areas of the Plan not addressed explicitly by other Plan elements or supporting work. Independent work must be supported by coursework or tutorials taken on Plan.
  • At least 10% of the Work must involve sustained engagement with at least one other individual or organization. This Interdependent Plan component should include: communicating with one or more other people over a sustained period of time; contributing meaningful work to a shared project; and learning about and taking into account the goals, needs, and values of the collaborators in the project. In order to facilitate assessment of the Interdependent Plan component, each student will include a reflection (in writing, podcast, video, etc.) addressing: their role in the project; the goals/needs/values of their collaborators as the student came to understand them; and the particular successes and challenges of the collaboration.

Changes to percentage weights must be made by the Friday before midterm faculty meeting of the final semester on Plan. Changes must be approved by the Dean of Faculty and Plan sponsor(s) and communicated by the student to the Registrar by this deadline. Clarifying changes in wording may be made after this deadline only as deemed appropriate by the Dean of Faculty in consultation with faculty sponsor(s). Students on extension are completing Plans already subject to final modification; no further substantive changes may be made.

  Grades, Junior Year

Standard grades (A-F) are given in courses and tutorials.

  Grades, Senior Year

Seniors may receive progress grades (S, S-, U) or letter grades for Plan courses and tutorials taken in the two semesters of their senior year.

Progress grades appear on a student’s transcript until after the oral evaluation, at which point the Registrar replaces progress grades with asterisks (*) on the transcript. The “*” leads to a statement under the Final Plan Grade: “Applies to all senior year Plan courses and tutorials.” The progress grades of seniors who do not complete their Plans remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

Standard grades remain on the transcript after the oral evaluation (i.e., they are not replaced with asterisks as with progress grades).

The student may choose between progress or letter grades at the time of registration and may change that choice no later than the deadline for dropping a course. The Plan sponsor and instructor must agree where letter grades are specified. Plan courses and tutorials that continue for more than one semester must receive the same treatment both semesters.

Seniors under the cumulative grading system who do not complete their Plan will (for transfer purposes) receive a Pass in courses they have completed at a satisfactory level.

  Tutorials with Non-Members of the Faculty

Students on Plan and their sponsor(s) may arrange for Plan-related tutorials with non-members of the faculty. The Plan sponsor is responsible for notifying the Registrar of such an arrangement at the start of each term, for the evaluation of the work, and for submitting grades. The student is responsible for any additional expenses incurred as a result of such work unless other arrangements are made in advance with the Dean of the Faculty in extraordinary cases.

  Oral Evaluation

The Board of Evaluators consists of the Plan sponsor and co-sponsors, a second faculty member if there are no co-sponsors, and an outside evaluator. Marlboro faculty who participate in major portions of a Plan should be on the committee. The Dean of Faculty appoints an outside evaluator upon recommendation of the Plan sponsor; students are encouraged to suggest names of possible outside evaluators.

At least one week before the oral evaluation, the outside evaluator must have copies of all exams, papers, journals, and other material which constitute the Work with the understanding that the evaluator will typically witness all exhibitions and performances. The outside evaluator should have the opportunity to evaluate all elements of the Plan and must have the opportunity to evaluate at least 90% of Plan work, including all work prepared independently of faculty guidance. However, when a student teaches, performs, or gives a public lecture, the outside evaluator may not be available. Therefore, all independent work, and elements with weightings of more than 10% must be documented for the outside evaluator. Weightings for a public lecture or class teaching must be kept to 10% or less. Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the Dean of Faculty, upon advice from the Curriculum Committee.

  Honorarium for Outside Evaluator

The College pays a $500 honorarium to the outside evaluator upon receipt of an evaluation of the Plan and oral evaluation. This covers travel expenses. However, for outside examiners who must travel long distances or who must make a second trip to the College to view a performance or exhibit, there may be travel funds available. If the outside evaluator must stay overnight, such arrangements and their cost are the student’s responsibility.

  Duplication Costs

The College pays the cost of photocopies of the Plan paper for the library and outside evaluator. If copying is done off campus, the College will reimburse the student for these “free” copies to a maximum of 10 cents/page. Receipts showing number of pages copied, number of copies made of each page and cost must be presented to the Plant and Operations Office prior to reimbursement.

  Written Evaluation

Plan sponsors and the outside evaluator must submit a written evaluation of the student’s work to the Registrar as soon as possible after the oral exam. All written evaluations will be made available to the student and retained in his or her permanent file for future reference.

  Senior Plan Written Assessment

Faculty members who have taught courses in the student’s senior year but who do not sit on the Board of Examiners will submit a written assessment of the student’s work to the Board of Examiners.

  Copy of the Work

All graduating students must submit both a final printed copy and a digital copy of the Work to the Registrar, including appropriate documentation of non-written work. Students are not required to submit undocumented components comprising less than 10% of the Work.

  Plan Grade

Upon the Plan’s completion, the evaluating board assigns a grade which covers the entire Plan.

  Satisfactory Progress

It is assumed that the student will make satisfactory progress on Plan. However, the faculty reserves the right to take action up to and including dismissal for academic failure, upon recommendation of the student’s Plan sponsor and the Dean of Faculty.

  Unsatisfactory Progress

When a student on Plan receives a report of unsatisfactory (U) from his or her Plan sponsor at the end of a semester, he or she will be placed on probation. If, at the end of the following semester, he or she is still doing unsatisfactory work, he or she may be dismissed from the College for academic failure.

When a student on Plan is, in the faculty’s opinion, making no significant effort to meet his or her academic responsibilities, he or she may be dismissed for academic failure. The student may instead be asked to do an extra semester’s work upon notice from the Dean of Faculty.

  Extensions

 There are two kinds of extensions for Plan work that are outlined below. Extensions for Plan work may be granted by the Dean of Faculty. The Plan sponsor must concur. The Director of Academic Advising may be contacted for help working out individual situations.

  Extension 1

For Scheduling Final Plan Evaluation:

If Plan work is complete, an extension of up to three months beyond the scheduled completion date may be granted for scheduling and taking written and oral examinations. There is no fee for this extension.

A student may not choose this category if,

  1. at the end of this semester, he or she has received unsatisfactory grades which would drop earned credits below the minimum of 45 credits required on Plan or 120 credits required for graduation;
    OR
  2. he or she needs further faculty assistance, including reading and commenting on drafts of the Work, regardless of credits earned.

  Extension 2

For Completing Plan Work:

If the student does not complete Plan work on time, and further faculty assistance is needed, he or she must register for further instruction or be discontinued.

(This is valid for the next spring semester for students scheduled to finish in December and for the next fall semester or the intervening summer for students scheduled to finish in May.)

The number of credits may range from 1-18, depending on the proportion of work needed to complete the Plan, and will be set by the Dean of Faculty after consultation with the student and the Plan sponsor. Students are charged on a per-credit basis for any remaining work.

If the work is not completed on time under Extension 2, further extension under Extension 1 is possible. A further extension under Extension 2 is possible, but only if the student submits a new Final Plan Application which the faculty must approve.

  Discontinuance

Marlboro’s curriculum depends on each student forming an individualized plan of study with his or her designated faculty sponsor for the junior year. These plans are expressed first in the Preliminary Plan Application and without it a student cannot successfully progress. Therefore it is part of the definition of good academic standing at Marlboro for students in their junior year to have completed the Preliminary Plan Application in a timely way. Failure to do so may result in the student being discontinued.

If the student fails to complete Plan work on time, he or she may elect to be discontinued by faculty vote. The student may complete (and is encouraged to complete) Plan work while discontinued, as long as the work does not require faculty assistance.

  Reinstatement

If a student has been discontinued in the junior year, the student may be reinstated by vote of the faculty once the student has secured a Plan sponsor and completed a Preliminary Plan Application. Reinstatement may only take place prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to return to Marlboro.

If the student finishes work independently (while discontinued), he or she must be reinstated by faculty vote for the purpose of final evaluation. The student has two years to show satisfactory progress on Plan and be reinstated by vote of the faculty. The student must pay a reinstatement fee in accordance with the current Marlboro College tuition and fee schedule. A student must be reinstated on Plan no later than three weeks prior to the date of Commencement.

If two years have passed, the student must petition the faculty for reinstatement. In this case, new requirements may be imposed.

  Student-Taught Courses

In exceptional cases, where the student has demonstrated mastery of the material, a student on Plan may teach a course for credit at the College under the supervision of the Plan sponsor. Typically, such courses will not exceed two credits. The student teacher must present a completed application including a course description and syllabus in advance of the deadline to the sponsor, then to the Curriculum Committee for review and approval. The sponsor is responsible for evaluating the work of students and for granting credit. The sponsor is expected to monitor the course by meeting regularly with the student teacher and by attending the course at least occasionally.

Students who are not on Plan may participate only in cooperative team-teaching with faculty members. The Curriculum Committee defines “team-teaching” as direct and continuous participation in the course by the faculty member.

The Dean of Faculty and the Registrar must be notified by the supervising faculty member about any course taught by a student.

Policy and Procedures on Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking

Sexual harassment is against the policies of Marlboro College and illegal under state and federal law. This applies to any employee or student, male or female. Marlboro College is committed to providing a workplace and educational environment free from this unlawful conduct. It is unlawful for an employer to retaliate against an employee for filing a complaint of sexual harassment or for cooperating in an investigation of sexual harassment. Please see this policy in full online.

Policy for Educational Reimbursements

In exceptional circumstances an employee may be reimbursed for the cost of educational instruction or training that improves or develops the job-related capabilities of that employee and advances the interests of the College. To be eligible for reimbursement the job-related benefit of the educational instruction or training must be endorsed by the employee’s supervisor, and reimbursement must be authorized by the president. Typically, endorsement of the educational instruction or training and authorization for reimbursement must be obtained before the employee begins the educational instruction or training. In the case of a faculty member, endorsement of the educational instruction or training shall normally come from the dean of the faculty. In the case of the president, the Compensation Committee of the Board of Trustees shall both review the request for educational instruction or training and act upon the reimbursement.

Reimbursement shall be contingent upon successful completion of the educational instruction or training or the successful completion of discrete segments of instruction or training, and on evidence of payment by the employee. The total amount of the reimbursement shall be determined on a case-by-case basis prior to the employee beginning the educational instruction or training, and according to such criteria as the nature, length and cost of the program of educational instruction or training. In exchange for reimbursement of the cost of educational instruction or training the employee may be required to commit to a specific term of future employment. If the employee leaves the employment of the college prior to completion of that term of employment the employee shall refund to the college a prorated portion of the reimbursement received based on the proportion of the term of employment uncompleted. If the college terminates the employment of the employee prior to the completion of that term-of-employment commitment, the college shall not be entitled to a refund of any portion of the reimbursement.

Policy on Academic Integrity

Preamble

Process: Faculty Member: Initial Determination of Infraction

Process: Committee on Academic Integrity: Case Hearing

Sanctioning Guidelines

Procedures for Appeal

Membership of the Committee on Academic Integrity 

References

  Preamble

Marlboro College community members have a commitment to living with integrity. The faculty, staff, and students strive to live and learn with honesty and respect for each other and each other’s work. It is the responsibility of all students to inform themselves of the content of Marlboro College’s Statement on Academic Integrity which describes students’ responsibilities in ensuring the academic integrity of their work. This Policy on Academic Integrity explains how Marlboro College deals with student plagiarism, a major infraction against the academic community, and the roles of students, faculty and the Committee on Academic Integrity in that process 

‘Plagiarism’ occurs when a student, with intent to deceive or with reckless disregard for proper scholarly procedures, presents any information, ideas or phrasing of another as if they were his/her own and/or does not give appropriate credit to the original source. Proper scholarly procedures require that all quoted material be identified by quotation marks or indentation on the page, and the source of information and ideas, if from another, must be identified and be attributed to that source. Students are responsible for learning proper scholarly procedures. 

  Process: Faculty Member: Initial Determination of Infraction

Initial Determination

A faculty member will determine whether student work submitted to them constitutes plagiarism, regardless of whether the infraction is deliberate, or arises from student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement. A faculty member may consult with colleagues during the process of evaluating an infraction, but must not identify the student to others.

A faculty member with reason to believe that student work that has been submitted may be plagiarized will meet with the student involved as soon as possible to notify the student of the work in question, to discuss the concern and inform the student of this policy. The faculty member should make a determination of plagiarism within five academic calendar working days. If the faculty member determines that no infraction occurred, he/she will notify the student of that determination, without reporting the suspected infraction to the Committee on Academic Integrity. If the faculty member determines that an infraction has occurred, he/she will decide upon a sanction and communicate that sanction to the student.

Sanctioning Guidelines

If a faculty member determines that the infraction arose as a result of student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement, the faculty member may deal with such infractions individually with the student without reporting the infraction to the Committee on Academic Integrity. In this case the faculty member is encouraged to require the student to resubmit the work.

If a faculty member determines that the infraction did not arise as a result of student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement, the faculty member will fail the work deemed to be plagiarized, and may fail the student for the course, depending on the severity and scope of the plagiarism. In order to aid the faculty member in this determination a record of previous infractions with their penalties will be kept. This record will not contain any information that will identify the student whose work it is but will give a record of the type and extent of the plagiarism and the penalty imposed. This record will be kept by the Director of Academic Advising.

If the sanction will render the student eligible for dismissal, the Director of Academic Advising will refer the case to the Committee on Academic Integrity for a case hearing.

Reporting to the Committee on Academic Integrity

If the faculty member has determined that plagiarism did occur, they will submit the Infraction Reporting Form to the Director of Academic Advising within five academic calendar working days of that determination. This form detailing the infraction, providing documentation, and indicating the sanction(s) will be signed by the faculty member. Infraction Reporting forms will be kept by the Director of Academic Advising in a file until a student’s graduation. If a student leaves the college without graduating he/she has the right to petition the Dean of Faculty to have the file removed after a period of not less than six years. Upon receiving the form, the Director of Academic Advising:

  • will notify the student that the form has been submitted, and offer the student the opportunity to submit a written statement to be filed with the form within five academic calendar working days. If the student submits a statement a copy will be given to the faculty member.
  • will determine if there have been multiple violations. If the student’s file contains at least two Infraction Reporting forms, the Director, in consultation with another member of the committee will initiate a case hearing by the Committee on Academic Integrity.
  • may initiate a case hearing with only one filed Infraction Reporting form that, after consultation with another member of the Committee, is agreed to be a sufficiently egregious case of plagiarism.

  Process: Committee on Academic Integrity: Case Hearing

A student or a faculty member involved in a case may also request the Chair to initiate a case hearing after the faculty determination of whether an infraction has occurred. The case hearing will be scheduled within 10 academic calendar working days of the decision to hold the hearing. A case hearing consists of the stages described below. The Chair will inform the student and faculty member when the Committee commences each of these stages.

  1. The Chair will distribute to the Committee members a copy of the faculty member’s Infraction Reporting Form, and a copy of the student’s statement if one has been submitted.
  2. The Committee will schedule a meeting with the student and with the faculty member separately. The student and the faculty member are entitled and encouraged to bring an advisor with them to their meeting. The advisor may recess the meeting for a short time to confer with the student or faculty member without the Committee present. The Committee’s deliberations will include: a discussion of the facts, a determination of responsibility, and assignment of a sanction other than dismissal.
  3. The Committee will communicate the determination of responsibility and the sanction imposed to the student and faculty member within two academic calendar working days of the last meeting with the student or faculty member. If necessary, the Committee will make a recommendation for action to the full faculty in the closed portion of the faculty meeting, and will communicate the faculty’s decision within two academic calendar days to the student and faculty member. The Chair will place a copy of the communication into the student’s Committee on Academic Integrity file.
  4. If the faculty member’s initial determination of an infraction occurs within two weeks of the end of a semester and timely scheduling of a case hearing process is not possible, or if the faculty member are unable to complete the determination of an infraction within two weeks of the end of a semester, the faculty member will assign the student involved a grade of M and provide the student with a written explanation that the grade is due to a potential plagiarism infraction under this Policy. The faculty member will complete the steps outlined above during the first week of the following semester. If the faculty member is, for any reason, not going to be present in that semester, he/she will designate a proxy to represent him/her in the hearing. If the student is not expected to be on campus then the hearing will take place immediately.

A student may choose not to participate in these proceedings. If this happens the process will go forward as outlined above, without him/her present.

  Sanctioning Guidelines:

The Committee may concur with the faculty member’s sanction.

The Committee may recommend guided probation or dismissal to the full faculty.

In the case of plagiarism on any part of the Work, with affected sections redone acceptably, shall not be resubmitted for examination for one year. Plan sponsors or the faculty may impose additional conditions or requirements.

If the Committee does not find plagiarism to have occurred, the Chair will report this to the faculty member and the student, and will destroy the Infraction Reporting form for the case.

  Procedures for Appeal

Appeal of the Finding by a faculty member

A student has the right to appeal the finding of plagiarism by the faculty member to the Committee on Academic Integrity within five academic calendar working days of the date on which the student is notified by the Chair that an Infraction Reporting Form has been submitted for his/her work. The student must make an appeal in writing to the Chair. The Chair of the Committee or the Director of Academic Advising may also request an appeal hearing on the finding of plagiarism or sanction imposed by the faculty member within five academic calendar working days of that date.

The Committee will schedule an appeal hearing within five academic calendar working days of receipt of a student’s written appeal, or the Chair’s or Director of Academic Advising’s request for an appeal. The hearing will be confidential. The student and faculty member may testify orally and present any evidence in writing they believe relevant to the appeal.

Within two academic calendar working days of the appeal hearing, the Committee will make a decision on the finding of plagiarism and communicate the decision to the student and faculty member. If the Committee finds that plagiarism did not occur, the Chair will destroy the Infraction Reporting Form filed by the faculty member. If the Committee upholds the finding of the faculty member, the file will be retained. The Chair will record such a decision to uphold the faculty finding of plagiarism, and what the final sanction will be in writing in the student’s Committee file.

The Chair of the Committee on Academic Integrity will provide written notification of its decision from an appeal hearing to the student, faculty member, and the Dean of Faculty. The decision of the Committee on Academic Integrity will be final.

Appeal of the Process

The student or faculty member involved in any aspect of the process covered by this Policy has the right to appeal directly to the Dean of Faculty if they believe that the process has not been followed as described. The student or faculty member must make an appeal in writing to the Dean within five academic calendar working days of the date on which they believe a deviation from this process occurred. The Dean, in consultation with concerned parties, will review the application of the process for the incident in question within five academic calendar working days of the appeal request, and will communicate the decision to the student and faculty member in writing. The Dean’s decision will be final.

  Membership of the Committee on Academic Integrity

The Committee on Academic Integrity consists of two faculty members appointed annually by the Dean of the Faculty, two students elected by Town Meeting annually, and the Director of Academic Advising.

In addition to overseeing this Policy and the processes contained within it, the Committee meets regularly to consider regulations of academic policy and issues of academic integrity. The Committee makes recommendations to the faculty either directly or through another committee.

Note: This policy was adapted, in part, from the policy of Willamette University with permission.

  References

  1. Pavela, Gary. “Applying the Power of Association on Campus: A Model Code of Academic Integrity.” Journal of College and University Law 24.1 (Summer 1997) http://www.academicintegrity.org/ai_model.asp.
  2. Office of Judicial Affairs, Duke University, 5 April 2007. http://judicial.studentaffairs.duke.edu/policies/policy_list/academic_dishonesty.html.
  3. Willamette University Policy on Plagiarism, 4 November 2006 http://www.willamette.edu/cla/catalog/2006/resources/policies/

Policy on Computer Use At Marlboro College: Rights & Responsibilities

Please see the Acceptable Computer Use Policy on the Marlboro College Website.

Prevention and Education

Marlboro College is committed to the prevention of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking, and expects community members to participate in regular workshops. Marlboro College follows the Department of Education guidelines on prevention of sexual assault prevention programming which are defined as follows:

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking are defined as comprehensive, intentional and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking that are

  • culturally relevant,
  • inclusive of diverse communities and identities,
  • sustainable,
  • responsive to community needs,
  • informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness or outcome.

The Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with the Survivor Advocate, will arrange for at least one prominently publicized educational training during each semester’s student orientation aimed at the prevention of sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. This training will take place when students will be present on campus and able to attend. This workshop will be conducted by the Title IX Coordinator, the Dean of Students, and the Survivor Advocate.

Privacy Policy

Information Privacy

At Marlboro College we value the privacy of our website visitors and we do not sell visitor names or other information to third parties. It is possible to visit Marlboro’s websites without self-revealing any personal information. We do, however, collect both personally identifiable data and anonymous information about visitors that may be shared with marketing partners of the college. Here are the kinds of data we collect and why.

Personally Identifiable Data

Personally identifiable data may include names, birth dates, social security numbers, credit card numbers, addresses, and more. All personally identifiable data is collected via secure forms which you, the website user, knowingly supply to Marlboro. We collect this type of data for purposes such as scheduling admissions visits, event registrations, donations to the college, and bookstore purchases.

Anonymous Data

Anonymous data is collected automatically and is not used to identify individuals. Marlboro collects this data for purposes such as assisting in admissions activities including advertising and to gather a better understanding about how visitors use the Marlboro websites. This information is collected through a variety of methods including scripts, cookies, and log files.

Security

Marlboro College follows industry-standard security measures, to protect the loss, misuse, and alteration of the information under our control.

Consent

By visiting the websites of Marlboro College, you consent to the collection and use of both personally identifiable and anonymous data as described above. Where appropriate users are given the option to opt-out of future communications. Marlboro College reserves the right to modify this document at any time.

Questions

If you have any questions regarding how Marlboro College handles your privacy with regard to its websites, you may contact our Marketing & Communications Department.

Professional Development Opportunities

Marlboro College appreciates that professional development can make you a more productive and engaged employee. You may request funds for enrollment in professional development courses, seminars and conferences that are relevant to your position. Participation in professional development is contingent upon approval, which is considered by your department head and according to scheduling constraints and the availability of funds. Please see your supervisor for more information on this benefit.

Professional Ethics

Marlboro College follows the code for professional ethics set forth by the American Association of University Professors. The following statement, a revision of the statement originally adopted by the AAUP in 1966, was approved by the AAUP Committee B on Professional Ethics, then adopted by the Council as Association policy, and finally endorsed by the 73rd annual meeting of the Association in June, 1987.

AAUP Introduction

From its inception, the American Association of University Professors has recognized that membership in the academic profession carries with it special responsibilities. The Association has consistently affirmed these responsibilities in major policy statements, providing guidance to professors as their utterances as citizens, in the exercise of their responsibilities to students and colleagues, and their conduct when resigning from his institution or when undertaking sponsored research. The Statement on Professional Ethics that follows sets forth those general standards that serve as a reminder of the variety of obligations assumed by all members of the profession.

In the enforcement of ethical standards, the academic profession differs from those of law and medicine, whose associations act to assure the integrity of members engaged in private practice. In the academic profession the individual institution of higher learning provides this assurance and so should normally handle questions concerning propriety of conduct within its own framework by reference to a faculty group. The Association supports local action and stands ready, through the General Secretary and Committee B, to counsel with members of the academic community concerning questions of professional ethics and to inquire into complaints when local consideration is impossible or inappropriate. If the alleged offense is deemed sufficiently serious to raise the possibility of adverse action, the procedures should be in accordance with the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, the 1958 Statement on Procedural Standards in Faculty Dismissal Proceedings, or the applicable provisions of the Association’s Recommended Institutional Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure.

The Statement on Professional Ethics

  1. Professors, guided by a deep conviction of the worth and dignity of the advancement of knowledge, recognize the special responsibilities placed upon them. Their primary responsibility to their subject is to seek and to state the truth as they see it. To this end professors devote their energies to developing and improving their scholarly competence. They accept the obligation to exercise critical self-discipline and judgment in using, extending, and transmitting knowledge. They practice intellectual honesty. Although professors may follow subsidiary interests, these interests must never seriously hamper or compromise their freedom of inquiry.
  2. As teachers, professors encourage the free pursuit of learning in their students. They hold before them the best scholarly and ethical standards of their discipline. Professors demonstrate respect for students as individuals, and adhere to their proper roles as intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic conduct and to assure that their evaluations of students reflect each student’s true merit. They respect the confidential nature of the relationship between professor and student. They avoid any exploitation, harassment, or discriminatory treatment of students. They acknowledge significant academic or scholarly assistance from them. They protect their academic freedom.
  3. As colleagues, professors have obligations that derive from common membership in the community of scholars. Professors do not discriminate against or harass colleagues. They respect and defend the free inquiry of associates. In the exchange of criticism and ideas professors show due respect for the opinion of others. Professors acknowledge academic debt and strive to be objective in their professional judgment of colleagues. Professors accept their share of faculty responsibilities for the governance of their institution.
  4. As members of an academic institution, professors seek above all to be effective teachers and scholars. Although professors observe the stated regulations of the institution, provided the regulations do not contravene academic freedom, they maintain their right to criticize and seek revision. Professors give due regard to their paramount responsibilities within their institutions in determining the amount and character of the work they do outside it. When considering the interruption or termination of their service, professors recognize the effect of their decision upon the program of the institution and give due notice of their intentions.
  5. As members of their community, professors have the rights and obligations of any citizen. Professors measure the urgency of these obligations in the light of their responsibilities to their subject, to their students, to their profession, and to their institution. When they speak or act as private persons, they avoid creating the impression of speaking or acting for their college or university. As citizens engaged in a profession that depends upon freedom for its health and integrity, professors have a particular obligation to promote conditions of free inquiry and to further public understanding of academic freedom.

Professional Responsibilities

The primary responsibility is to design and to teach courses and tutorials consistent with the fields of study within which they hold their appointments and within the terms of their appointments. In addition, faculty members serve as academic advisors to students (see Academic Advising). Faculty members are also generally expected to participate in the governance of the College through Faculty Meetings, Town Meetings, and committee assignments.

Purpose and General Expectations

Your role at Marlboro College is crucial. Every position at the College is interdependent and relies on the presence of others to facilitate communication and collaboration. The consistent and predictable attendance of employees allows community members to focus on collaboration and accomplishment while supporting the planning of departmental workload, events and projects.

All employees must be present and available for work when scheduled. Administrative offices and functions must be open, staffed and available to the community and the public during business hours. Employees need to work together to provide continuity and availability during lunch and breaks whenever possible.

Records Policy

The OAS will keep, in confidentiality, all records for students with disabilities until graduation, at which time they will be purged. If a student is withdrawn, dismissed or discontinued before that time, records will be kept for 3 years or until documentation is not longer current.

Refund Policy

Withdrawals and Leaves of Absences Policy

Financial Obligations

Return of Title IV Funds Policy

  Withdrawals and Leaves of Absences Policy

No adjustment of tuition, fees, institutional or non-federal aid will be made in the event that a student withdraws or separates from the College at any time after enrollment except as herein specified. No adjustment is made in cases of suspension or expulsion or dismissal from campus housing as a result of disciplinary action. Students who are granted a leave of absence after the start of classes will be treated in the same manner as students who withdraw from the College for calculation purposes. The same policy applies to a student on a one-semester or full-year of absentia status. Exceptions are made if a policy for aid other than institutional aid requires the college to return funds in full or in part.

The Federal Start of Term is the first day of classes which includes Intro Classes.

If the withdrawal occurs before the first day of classes an adjustment of tuition, student activities fees, health services fees, student health insurance, board and non-federal aid will be made. There will be no refund of the enrollment deposit. The enrollment deposit may be carried forward in the event a student postpones enrollment for up to one academic year. Students remain liable for the full housing charge.

If a withdrawal occurs on or after the first day of classes an adjustment to the student account for tuition, board (meal plan), health services fee and non-federal aid will be made according to the schedule below. Students remain liable for student activities fees, lab fees, student health insurance and the full housing charge.

If the official withdrawal occurs on or after the first day of classes (Federal Start of Term), the schedule of tuition, board, health service fees and non-federal aid is calculated as follows, based on calendar days:

  1. If the withdrawal occurs within the first 7 days, an adjustment of 80 percent is applied to the account.
  2. If the withdrawal occurs within day 8 through day 14, an adjustment of 60 percent is applied to the account.
  3. If the withdrawal occurs within day 15 through day 21, an adjustment of 40 percent is applied to the account.
  4. If the withdrawal occurs within day 22 through day 28, an adjustment of 20 percent is applied to the account.
  5. No tuition, fees and non-federal aid is returned or refunded after 28 days.

A student’s withdrawal date is:

  1. the date the student officially notifies the Registrar’s Office of intent to withdraw; or
  2. the date the student begins the College’s withdrawal process; or
  3. the midpoint of the semester for a student who leaves without notifying the College; or
  4. at the College’s discretion, the student’s last date of attendance at a documented academically-related activity (which includes but is not limited to an exam, a tutorial, computer-assisted instruction, academic counseling, academic advising, turning in a class assignment or attending a study group that is assigned by the institution).

Withdrawing students who live in campus housing are expected to vacate the campus within 24 hours of notifying the Registrar of their intent to withdraw unless an extension has been granted by the Director of Housing and Residential Life.

If the College’s refund calculation policy conflicts with the Veterans Administration regulations concerning enrolled veterans receiving VA benefits, the VA policy on refunds will prevail.

  Financial Obligations

Enrolled Students who accept a housing assignment but subsequently do not live in campus housing for any reason will be charged a room contract fee in the amount of $400. In addition, students with approved housing assignments who fail to notify the College that they will not live in campus housing at least two weeks prior to the date the dorms open are responsible for the full room charge.

Students who move off campus during the term for personal reasons (or who live in campus housing not requiring them to be on meal plan) who opt to discontinue participation in the meal plan qualify for a reduction of board fees according to the schedule above.

  Return Of Title IV Funds Policy

Adjustments in financial aid awards for students who withdraw on or after the first day of classes are determined according to a formula prescribed by federal regulations. Marlboro College and the student will be required to return to the federal aid programs the amount of aid received that was in excess of the aid “earned” for the time period the student was enrolled.

The percentage of the semester completed is the percentage of aid earned: This is calculated by the number of days the student attended divided by the number of days in the payment period (i.e. semester). For example, if a student withdrew on the 20th day of a semester 114 days in length, the student would have earned only 17.5% of the aid he or she received (20/114=0.175). Students who remain enrolled through at least 60% of the semester are considered to have earned 100% of the aid received and will not be subject to a return of Federal Title IV funds. Students receiving financial aid who leave before the 60% point of the semester may not have enough “earned” aid to cover charges owed but are still responsible for satisfying their financial obligations to the College. Students considering withdrawal are strongly encouraged to confer with the Financial Aid Office and the Student Accounts Office concerning any anticipated refund of charges and adjustments in financial aid. Students may also be required to return funds released to them for personal expenses. Details of the federal regulations can be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

Refund Policy

Please refer to the Refund Policy as listed earlier in this handbook.

Reporting Sexual Misconduct Overview

Statement of the Complainant’s Rights

Statement of the Respondent’s Rights

Disclosure and reporting options

Remedies, Including Interim Measures

Marlboro College is committed to offering support to those who have experienced sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking. The College understands that individuals who have concerns about such conduct may look for assurances of confidentiality, and endeavors to provide options that protect confidentiality to the fullest extent possible.

Getting Confidential Support and Resources
You may be upset about something that happened, even if you are not sure whether it violates this Policy or if you want to file a complaint. In such an event, you should consider contacting one of the confidential resources listed in the following section to seek support or advice. They can advise you about your options, help you get support, and assist you as you consider whether to file a formal complaint.

  • Contact the Women’s Freedom Center 24 Hour Hotline: 802-254-6954.
  • On weekdays during business hours, contact the Total Health Center at 802-258-9335. See more information in the “Resources” section below.
  • Make an appointment with the Coordinator for Prevention, Intervention and Advocacy who serves as the college’s Survivor Advocate, currently Megan Grove, who can be reached at survivoradvocate@marlboro.edu or 802-258-9227. See more information above and below regarding the role and limitations on the confidentiality practices of the Survivor Advocate.

  A. Statement of the Complainant’s Rights

  • The right to be treated with respect by all parties to the process.
  • The right to be free from discouragement from reporting or continuing their education or employment at the school.
  • The right to have complaints of sexual misconduct responded to in accordance with the timeline outlined in this Policy.
  • The right to confidentiality to the extent possible.
  • The right to have an Advisor or Support Person of the complainant’s choice accompany the complainant to all meetings related to the complaint process.
  • The right to be informed of the option to notify proper law enforcement authorities, and the option to be assisted by campus officials in notifying such authorities, if the complainant so chooses.
  • The right to be notified of available physical and mental health support services both on campus and in the community for survivors of sexual misconduct.
  • The right to notification of options for changing academic, working, transportation and living situations after an alleged sexual misconduct incident.
  • The right to opt out of the process even though the process may continue.
  • The right to speak and present information on one’s own behalf.
  • The right to have sexual history with anyone other than the respondent be excluded from presentation in the complaint process.
  • The right to request conditions that must be observed by the involved parties during this process which may include no contact, third party supervision, or alternative grade review.
  • The right to be free from retaliation.
  • The right to request emergency suspension of the respondent or a third-party in the case of stalking, threatening, harassing or other improper behavior that presents a danger to the welfare of the complainant.
  • The right to be informed of the outcome and sanction of any disciplinary process involving sexual misconduct.
  • The right to appeal the outcome of a disciplinary process, provided the appeal meets the grounds outlined in the “Appeals Procedure” section of this Policy.

  B. Statement of the Respondent’s Rights

  • The right to be presumed not in violation of this Policy unless and until a violation is established through the discipline process.
  • The right to be treated with respect by all parties to the process.
  • The right to continue their education or employment during the process, unless the College determines that interim separation is necessary.
  • The right to have complaints that fall within the scope of this Policy be responded to in accordance with the timeline outlined in this Policy.
  • The right to confidentiality to the extent possible.
  • The right to have an Advisor or Support Person of the respondent’s choice accompany the respondent to all meetings related to the complaint process.
  • The right to access campus resources for medical, counseling, and advisory services.
  • The right to a change in on-campus residence and/or an adjustment to their academic schedule, if such changes are reasonably available.
  • The right to opt out of the process even though the process may continue.
  • The right to speak and present information on one’s own behalf.
  • The right to have irrelevant sexual history, such as history regarding the respondent’s sexual history with others, be excluded from presentation in the responsibility phase of the complaint process (relevant sexual history may be considered in the sanctioning process, as described below).
  • The right to be informed of the outcome and sanction of any disciplinary process involving sexual misconduct.
  • The right to appeal the outcome of a disciplinary process, provided the appeal meets the grounds outlined in the “Appeals Procedure” section of this Policy.

  C. Disclosure and Reporting Options

i. Filing a Complaint with the Title IX Coordinator

To file a report or complaint of sexual misconduct, contact the Title IX Coordinator, Jean Kiewel, by email at jkiewel@marlboro.edu. Alternately, you may access our Report Form through Google Docs. Download and save a local copy. When completed, attach the document to an email and send to jkiewel@marlboro.edu. Alternatively, you may print off the document and deliver in a sealed envelope to:

Jean Kiewel
Title IX Coordinator
PO Box A
2582 South Road
Marlboro, VT 05344

The Title IX Coordinator can discuss all available options with a person reporting conduct that violates this Policy, including criminal and civil options, as well as the College’s sexual misconduct complaint process. The College will also make these services available to people who have been indirectly involved in a sexual misconduct situation, even if they are not a complainant. The Title IX Coordinator may not, however, be able to guarantee confidentiality to a complainant if there is a threat to the complainant or the College community. In certain instances applicable to “responsible employees” described below, the Title IX Coordinator is obligated to report when they learn of a violation of this Policy. See more about the Title IX Coordinator’s role and responsibility in the Terms and Definitions section of this Policy.

NOTE: Students reporting incidents will be covered under the College’s Good Samaritan Policy, meaning that a person bringing a complaint will not be penalized for alcohol and/or other drug use at the time of the incident.

ii. Reporting to a Responsible Employee

At Marlboro College, all faculty and staff members, including Resident Advisors are considered Responsible Employees and Campus Security Authorities. If responsible employees learn about an alleged violation of the sexual misconduct policy, they are required by federal law to report relevant details (such as the name of the complainant and Respondent, any witnesses, and other relevant facts, such as the date, time and specific location of the alleged incident) to the Title IX Coordinator or other College officials. Responsible employees are respectful of a complainant’s wishes to the extent appropriate and are discreet, but they are not able to guarantee confidentiality. General inquiries or questions about this Policy may remain private, and the College will strive to protect the privacy of individuals to the extent it can while maintaining its obligations to uphold relevant policies and regulations and/or to take reasonable steps to promote the safety of members of the College community.

Reports of sexual misconduct to responsible employees will be forwarded to the Title IX Coordinator who will determine what steps need to be taken. Generally, the College will investigate the report to determine what occurred and the College will provide interim measures during the investigative process and any disciplinary process. However, for complainants who report sexual misconduct to responsible employees but request that the College not pursue an investigation or otherwise keep their report confidential (e.g., from the respondent), the Title IX Coordinator will consider whether the College can honor the complainant’s request while still providing a safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all students. Whether the Title IX Coordinator decides that the College can honor the confidentiality request or must pursue an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator (or designee) will inform the complainant of available interim measures and coordinate appropriate interim measures for the complainant.

iii. Notifying Local Law Enforcement

Reports or concerns regarding sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking may also be reported, and any safety concerns should be reported immediately, to local law enforcement agencies, the contact information for which is:

  • Vermont State Police Department: 802-257-7101, 464 Marlboro Rd, Brattleboro, VT
  • Brattleboro Police Department: 802-257-7946, 230 Main St., Brattleboro, VT
  • Windham County Sheriff’s office: 802-365-4941, 11 Jail St., Newfane, VT

Inquiries or complaints that involve potential violations of Title IX may also be referred to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, which can be reached at: https://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/cfapps/OCR/contactus.cfm or the Educational Opportunities Section of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ): >http://www.justice.gov/crt/complaint/#three.

iv. Reporting to the Survivor Advocate or Professional Confidential Counselors

The College also offers complainants an option for the complainant’s confidential resource (such as a professional counselor or Survivor Advocate) to request supportive measures from the College without reporting the sexual misconduct to the College. While we strongly encourage all individuals subjected to misconduct prohibited by this policy to report the misconduct to the College directly, we want complainants to have access to supportive measures regardless of when or whether they decide to report the conduct to the College.

Reporting to the Survivor Advocate or a confidential professional is another option that allows a complainant who has not reported the misconduct to a responsible employee to disclose the misconduct to a confidential professional counselor or Survivor Advocate who in turn can request interim measures on the complainant’s behalf from the College. Under this option, complainants should be aware that when such an individual requests interim measures on their behalf from a responsible employee of the College and discloses that the reason for the request is sexual misconduct or other misconduct prohibited by this Policy, the request may trigger the College’s obligation to investigate. To the extent such an individual makes such a disclosure, but, consistent with the complainant’s wishes, asks the College not to investigate or otherwise notify the respondent of the report, the Title IX Coordinator will consider whether the College can honor the request while still providing a safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all students.

The College recognizes that confidential resources such as professional counselors and (to the extent permitted under College policy) Survivor Advocates are often in a unique position to know when and what interim measures or supportive measures would be most appropriate to address a complainant’s health and safety needs. For this reason, complainants who disclose incidents of sexual misconduct or other misconduct prohibited by this Policy to their professional counselor or Survivor Advocate should discuss whether to have such individual report the misconduct to the College and request interim measures required by Title IX or request discretionary supportive measures from the College without reporting the nature of the conduct. Such individual will work with the complainant to determine what information the complainant is willing to have shared with College employees involved in securing interim measures or supportive measures. Such individual will explain how sharing certain information with responsible employees may trigger the College’s Title IX obligation to investigate. Complainants should understand that the College’s ability to implement interim measures that would affect the would-be respondent may be limited if the complainant chooses not to have the College go forward with an investigation. Professional counselors and Survivor Advocates can discuss these issues with complainants.

  D. Remedies, Including Interim Measures

i. Interim Measures Overview

Upon learning of a report or complaint of sexual misconduct, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly take steps to ensure the complainant’s equal access to the College’s programs and activities and protect the complainant as necessary. Such steps include taking interim measures before the final outcome of any investigation, providing remedial measures after the final outcome of investigation, and making the complainant aware of all available resources, including resources such as survivor advocacy, housing assistance, academic support, counseling, disability services, health and mental health services, student financial aid advising, visa and immigration assistance, and legal assistance. The Title IX Coordinator and/or others at the College will also assist individuals affected by the types of misconduct prohibited by this policy, even if they do not wish to participate in a formal College process. Interim measures are discussed in more detail below.

Upon a finding of prohibited sexual misconduct, the Title IX Coordinator will determine whether campus-wide remedies should be adopted in response, including, by way of example but not limitation, review and revision of the College’s sexual misconduct policies, increased monitoring, supervision or security at locations where sexual misconduct is reported to occur, and increased education and prevention efforts, including to targeted populations.

If it is found through the College’s disciplinary processes that an individual engaged in prohibited sexual misconduct, the Title IX Coordinator will review proposed sanctions before they are imposed to ensure that they, along with the College’s interim and long-term measures taken in response to the sexual misconduct, are reasonably calculated to stop the sexual misconduct and prevent its recurrence.

ii. Options for Requesting Interim Measures or Supportive Measures – Details

Interim measures are those services, accommodations, or other assistance that the College puts in place for complainants after receiving notice of alleged sexual misconduct but before any final outcomes—investigatory, disciplinary, or remedial—have been determined. We want complainants to be safe, to receive appropriate medical attention, and to get the help they need to heal and to continue to access their educational and employment opportunities. We also want complainants to understand their reporting options and how to access available interim measures. The College encourages complainants to report issues covered by this Policy to the College’s Title IX coordinator or any responsible employee with whom the individual feels comfortable. The College recognizes that sexual and other violence is traumatic and may leave individuals feeling overwhelmed and confused. This Policy seeks to provide clear guidance regarding available resources and who can help in securing them.

Upon receiving a report of sexual misconduct, the College will provide the complainant, or the complainant’s Advisor or Support Person, with a written explanation of the interim measures available on campus and through local community resources, and shall ask the complainant or their Advisor or Support Person what measures are sought. Requests for interim measures by a respondent will be received and addressed on a case-by-case basis.

Some possible interim measures are listed below, and the College will determine which measures are appropriate for a particular party on a case-by-case basis. Not all of the measures listed below will be necessary in every case to keep parties safe and ensure their equal access to educational programs and activities and employment opportunities. If a party or their Advisor or Support Person identifies an interim measure that is not already provided by the College, the College will consider whether the request can be granted.

Example interim measures include, when requested and reasonably available:

  • academic accommodations (for additional information, see below),
  • medical and mental health services, including counseling,
  • change in campus housing,
  • assistance in finding alternative housing,
  • assistance in arranging for alternative College employment arrangements and/or changing work schedules,
  • a “No contact” directive pending the outcome of an investigation and/or thereafter. Such a directive serves as notice to both parties that they must not have verbal, electronic, written, or third party communication with one another,
  • transportation accommodations or parking arrangements to ensure safety and access to other services,
  • assistance identifying an advocate to help secure additional resources or assistance including off-campus and community advocacy, support, and services, and
  • assistance in understanding financial aid implications of any decision on the complainant’s part to seek a leave of absence or reduction in course load.

The College will work with parties or their Advisor or Support Person to identify what interim measures are appropriate in the short term (e.g., during the pendency of an investigation or other school response), and will continue to work collaboratively throughout the College’s process and as needed thereafter to assess whether the instituted measures are effective, and if not, what additional or different measures are necessary to keep the complainant safe.

As explained below, when a confidential resource (such as a professional counselor or the Survivor Advocate (to the extent permitted by College policy)) requests any of the above measures on the complainant’s behalf without disclosing that sexual misconduct is the basis for the request, the College will consider these requests for supportive measures consistent with its general practice of allowing confidential resources and the Survivor Advocate to seek such measures for individuals who may have experienced trauma without requiring that the nature of the trauma be disclosed.

iii. Living Accommodations

A complainant or a respondent who is a student may at any time request that the College provide a change in their housing assignment, free of charge, for the purposes of safety. The Title IX Coordinator will work with the complainant or respondent and the Director of Housing and Residential Life to find suitable safe housing as soon as possible after the request is made. Safe housing may include temporary off-campus accommodation so long as transportation is readily available.

iv. Academic Accommodations

Academic accommodations are one type of interim measure that the College may provide to a party after receiving a report of conduct in violation of this Policy to ensure that the party is safe and can continue to access educational opportunities. It may be possible to secure time-limited academic accommodations, such as rescheduling an exam. If the party experiences persistent academic difficulties as a result of the reported misconduct or an investigation (e.g., including difficulties stemming from anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or any other mental or physical illnesses or injuries), the party may request more long-term academic accommodations, such as a Medical Leave of Absence or a Dean’s Incomplete. If the party does not have a treating provider but is suffering from health-related issues such as those identified above, the student should contact the College’s Total Health Center (802-258-9335) to be connected with a campus health provider or appropriate off-campus resource. Students may also be entitled to additional services and supports if they have a disability, including those who developed a disability as a result of experiencing sexual misconduct. Disability services at the College are coordinated by the Office of Disability Services (802-258-9235).

A party, their Advisor or Support Person, or their confidential resource may request the following academic accommodations as interim measures. The College—after consulting with the party or their Advisor, Support Person or confidential resource—will determine which accommodations are appropriate to ensure the student’s safety and equal access to educational programs and activities. Requests for academic accommodations may include assistance in:

  • transferring to another section of a lecture or laboratory,
  • rescheduling an academic assignment or test,
  • accessing academic support (e.g., tutoring),
  • arranging for incompletes, a leave of absence, or withdrawal from campus,
  • preserving eligibility for academic, athletic, or other scholarships, financial aid, internships, study abroad, or foreign student visas, and
  • understanding any related financial aid implications.

Reporting Time Worked and Time Off

If you are a non-exempt staff member or a student employee, you are required to submit a timecard at the end of each pay period listing all hours worked as well as any paid time off. The timecard must be signed in ink by both you and your supervisor and must be submitted to the payroll office by noon on the Monday following the end of the pay period. Be sure to record your time accurately, rounding to the nearest 15-minute interval. Lunch or time away from the job or campus must be noted on the timecard. It is the responsibility of both you and your supervisor to ensure that timecards are accurate and timely.

If you are an exempt staff member you are paid a salary and need not track your hours worked. However, you must track your time off by submitting a monthly payroll calendar by the 15th day of the following month. This calendar must be submitted even if you did not take any days off in the month. Before the start of each fiscal year, a general payroll calendar (subject to change) will be published stating the dates for payroll periods and pay dates during the year.

The integrity of the employment relationship at Marlboro depends on your honest participation. Failure to submit accurate and timely payroll records or any falsification of timecards or payroll calendar, including misstatement or omission of time worked, is a violation of College policy.

Research Policy

Research Policy 

Review of Research with Human and Animal Subjects

Review Procedure

Expedited Review

Full Board Review

Classroom Activities 

Final Considerations 

Journalism 

Oral Histories

  Research Policy

Marlboro College upholds the principles of the Belmont Report[1] in assuring that human research subjects are treated with dignity, respect, and consideration for their welfare. All students, faculty, and staff conducting research with human subjects are expected to submit research proposals to the IRB before their research begins. For the purpose of institutional review, Marlboro College defines “research” as a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. This definition includes research development, testing, and evaluation. A “human subject” is defined as a living individual about whom an investigator obtains: a) data through intervention or interaction with the individual, or b) identifiable private information. Faculty are expected to guide students in the selection of topics, research design, the responsible gathering and reporting of data, and ethical considerations. All students who work with human or animal subjects – even when that work is not defined as ‘research’ for the purposes of IRB review (see below) – are required to be familiar with ethical and procedural standards appropriate to their academic discipline(s) and should be ready to affirm that their work with human and animal subjects has been conducted in accordance with those principles.

The College sponsors annual workshops on research principles and practices. Details on IRB procedures, research issues, and sample forms can be found on our website (link to website).

  Review of Research with Human and Animal Subjects

All Marlboro faculty, staff, and students who undertake College-sponsored research using human or animal subjects are required to comply with the guidelines for ethical practices established by their discipline(s), and to submit a research proposal to the IRB, except in the specific circumstances outlined below. “College-sponsored research” is defined as any research conducted for credit or using College resources.

The College retains the authority, as part of its institutional research and assessment, to collect and review data about students, instructors, and staff and will use such data responsibly. Outside individuals and groups wishing to use the Marlboro faculty, staff or students as subjects of research, even in an anonymous survey, are required to submit a written proposal to the IRB outlining the nature and proposed use of the research.

  Review Procedure

Some proposals may qualify for expedited review. The guidelines below indicate which type of review, expedited review or full board review, is appropriate. Contact the Chair of the IRB with questions about these guidelines. Student proposals must have a signed endorsement from a faculty sponsor. Full Board meetings occur on a schedule – research proposals requiring full board review must be submitted a month ahead of the meeting at which the research is to be reviewed. The meeting schedule is listed here: (link to website)

  Expedited Review

The Chair of the IRB, or a member of the committee designated by the Chair, may examine and approve proposals involving the following types of research:

  • Studies that do not involve vulnerable populations;
  • Studies that involve only minimal risk, such as surveys and interviews on non-sensitive subjects;
  • Unobtrusive observation of manifestly public behavior;
  • Participant observation where all participants are aware of the investigator’s role;
  • Survey research in which subjects remain anonymous;
  • Record research where the subjects are not identified by name.

  Full Board Review

Any research activity with human subjects which involves any of the following must go through full review by the IRB.

  • Vulnerable populations as participants (including but not limited to: children, prisoners, pregnant women and fetuses, decisionally impaired individuals, Marlboro College students or college employees, institutionalized individuals, economically or educationally disadvantaged individuals, HIV-positive individuals);
  • Sensitive subject matter - including but not limited to:
    • Sexual orientation, incest, rape, sexual molestation, deviant sexual behavior or attitudes regarding sexual conduct (pedophilia, bestiality, etc.), practices of contraception, abortion, and/or pregnancy;
    • Substance use and/or abuse (including but not limited to: alcohol, marijuana, steroids, amphetamines, narcotics, and any prescription medication legally or illegally obtained);
    • Questions about mental health (e.g. suicide, depression, obsessive compulsive behaviors like smoking, eating, gambling, etc.);
    • The traumatic experiences of an individual, including war or combat experiences of veterans.
  • Risk that exceeds the ordinary risk of daily life
  • Deception
  • Invasive Techniques

  Classroom Activities

Projects conducted solely to teach students research techniques or methodologies are not research, and therefore have a different level of scrutiny. Classroom activities are classified as instructional and not as research – as such they do not need IRB review, if the following conditions are met:

  • The project involves minimal risk to the subjects (i.e. the anticipated risks are akin to the risks ordinarily encountered in daily life);
  • The project does not involve sensitive topics or confidential information that could place a participant at risk if disclosed;
  • The project does not involve people from vulnerable populations (as described above, with the exception of Marlboro College students) as participants;
    • The main concern with students is that they not feel directly or indirectly coerced to participate. In the classroom it is the instructor’s responsibility to make sure that students are conducting the classroom activities in a way that is not coercive.
  • The results of the project will never be distributed outside the classroom and/or institutional setting, or used for publication. Results may be presented to instructors or peers for educational purposes only as part of a class assignment.
  • No one receives financial compensation for collecting, organizing, analyzing, or reporting the data.

  Final Considerations

  1. All research with children under the age of 18 must be reviewed by the IRB. Children are considered a vulnerable research population. They are less able to give fully-informed consent with respect to the research involved. Safeguard procedures and considerations are, therefore, required by the Federal regulations for the review of research involving children. In almost all cases, written consent from a parent or legal guardian must be obtained if the research involves children under the age of 18.
  2. Even in projects not subject to review, the instructor/faculty member is responsible for upholding the ethical guidelines for research in their field.
  3. It is the responsibility of the supervising instructor/faculty member to determine whether projects are subject to review. It is always best to seek consultation from the IRB if a question arises regarding human subjects, research and classroom activities.

  Journalism

Most activities considered journalism – i.e., investigations and interviews that focus on the collection, verification, reporting and analysis of information or facts on current or past events, trends or newsworthy issues – do not require IRB review. For the purposes of the IRB, “research” refers to “systematic investigation[s] designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” While journalists may engage in a systematic investigation, the end result of their interviews is simply reported (or quoted), and synthesis or interpretation of what was said is not offered and no attempt is made to generalize. This differs from research that attempts to synthesize information in order to apply the newfound knowledge to others or for the benefit of others.

When journalists do engage in activities normally considered scientific research intended to produce generalizable knowledge (e.g., systematic research, surveys, and/or interviews that are intended to test theories or develop models), these activities may be subject to IRB review. In such cases student researchers and their sponsoring faculty members should consult with the IRB. Marlboro expects all journalistic projects to be conducted only after training in journalistic methods, and in accord with the Code of Ethics established by The Society of Professional Journalists.

  Oral Histories

The IRB recognizes two types of Oral History projects. The purpose for which information is gathered and the researcher’s approach to conducting interviews determine whether an oral history project is subject to IRB review. Whether or not a project is determined to be exempt from review, ethical principles should govern all research activities.

Idiographic Oral Histories involve information-gathering activities, such as open ended interviews, that only document a specific historical event or the experiences of individuals, without intent to draw conclusions or generalize findings. Idiographic Oral Histories DO NOT constitute “research” and are EXEMPT from IRB review. However, the treatment of participants in oral history projects must conform to the standards of the Oral History Association. For Oral History projects that fall into this category, please complete the Oral History Project Registration Form (a link to the form will be created here) instead of a full IRB application.

Nomothetic Oral Histories are systematic investigations which

  • incorporate data collection (either quantitative or qualitative) and data analysis to answer a research question; and/or
  • are designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge – i.e., to draw conclusions, inform policy, or generalize findings (for example, where knowledge gained from a study might be applied to populations outside of the specific study population).

Nomothetic Oral Histories DO constitute “research,” and are therefore subject to regular IRB review.

All questions about this policy or its applicability to proposed research should be directed to the chair of the IRB.

[1] “The Belmont Report.” Human Subjects Research (45 CFR 46). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. April 18, 1979. Web. Accessed 12/2/2014. http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/belmont.html

Resident Assistant Program

The purpose of the Resident Assistant program is to promote health, safety and courtesy in College housing.

RA’s at Marlboro College are peer leaders who help the daily function of the living units. They serve as a facilitator of community, a link between the students and the administration and as a first contact for problems that students might have. An RA is an advocate for the living unit, and should be familiar with the needs of the students living in his or her building. The RA is not a police officer, but assists community members in enforcing the policies, and should act in accordance with the rules and regulations set forth by Town Meeting and the administration. The RA is a unique resource for members of our residential community.

The Director of Housing and Residential Life and an interview team of faculty, staff and students select Resident Assistants annually.

The Resident Assistant is responsible for:

As the College’s representative in the dorms, the Resident Assistant assumes many roles. The RA’s responsibilities largely center on establishing and maintaining a dormitory atmosphere that is conducive to residents overall education and development. This involves assisting students on both an individual and group basis.

The Resident Assistant job can generally be described in six areas:

  • General RA Skills: The RA provides leadership, initiative and support to students. RAs are expected to actively demonstrate positive personal, academic, and job-related behaviors.
  • Helping Skills: The RA is expected to be available to discuss student concerns and problems, both individually and in groups. The RA also initiates referrals to the various specialized services available on campus and in the community.
  • Community Development: The RA provides leadership and support for educational and social activities in the dorms and in collaboration with other campus groups or resources. RAs promote an atmosphere where students are able to grow both academically and personally.
  • Community Constitution and By-Laws: The RA is expected to actively promote and support policies outlined in the Marlboro College community constitution and by-laws. This necessitates that the RA be thoroughly familiar with the constitution and by-laws, as well as the procedures for mediating disputes, understanding policy and reporting incidents.
  • Preparation and Planning: RAs are responsible for establishing dorm charters, as well as preparing and maintaining their dorm. RAs must complete all required paperwork in a timely and accurate manner.
  • Teambuilding: RAs must be able to work with other staff members in a professional manner. They should also be able to provide leadership in their dorms with enthusiasm and spirit.

Resident Assistants participate in RA training during the 10 days prior to the opening of the College in the fall, and they attend weekly Residential Life Staff meetings.

Resident Assistants are compensated with a single room, free of charge, and a $2000 stipend.

Resignation Procedure

Staff members are asked to submit resignations in writing to their supervisors. Although staff members are free to resign at any time for any reason, in order to ensure a smooth transition of duties, staff members resigning from administrative and non-academic positions are requested to provide the College with reasonable notice as appropriate to their position. Generally, reasonable notice is considered to be three months for presidential appointees and one pay period for other staff members.

Retirement Healthcare Benefit Program (Emeriti)

Marlboro College offers a retirement healthcare program for qualified employees. You must be a regular or academic-calendar staff member working at least 30 hours per week. The program offers an alternative or additional way for you to accumulate and invest funds during your working years in preparation for future medical costs and provides access to group health insurance in retirement. Marlboro College contributes a fixed dollar amount for employees 40 years of age or older that have worked for the College for at least one year. Eligible staff members at least 21 years of age may make voluntary contributions to the plan. Contributions by the College are tax free to the employee; however, voluntary contributions are made after-tax. All assets including earnings are paid out tax-free for retiree health benefits, including health insurance premiums. There are no contribution limits. Please contact the human resources office to enroll in the plan or for more information.

Retirement Plan 403(b) (TIAA-CREF)

The College sponsors both a supplemental retirement account (SRA) plan and a defined contribution retirement plan. Participation in both plans is voluntary. Eligible employees may begin participation in and contributing to the SRA after 30 days from the date of hire. The College does not match your contributions to the SRA, but you may contribute to your SRA on a tax-deferred basis under Internal Revenue Service Code 403(b). Tax deferral means that you do not pay current income taxes on the contributions. However, you should expect to pay income taxes on benefits when those are paid to you.

You are eligible to participate in the defined-contribution plan after you complete one year of continuous service. For plan purposes, a year of service is defined as a 12-month period in which you work at least 1,000 hours. You must continue working at least 1,000 hours per year to maintain your eligibility for the defined-contribution plan. Contributions to the defined contribution plan are made by you and the College. If you contribute at least 1% but not more than 4% of salary, the College will equally match your contribution. Both your and the College’s contributions to the defined contribution plan are made on a tax-deferred basis.

You become immediately vested in both the SRA and defined-contribution plans. This means that your accumulation cannot revert to the College. This vesting entitles you to the contributions provided by the College, and to your contributions. The two retirement plans offer a variety of benefit payment options ranging from a lifetime pension income to lump sum payment of the accumulation attributable to your contributions.

The Plan is funded through Retirement Annuity contracts issued by TIAA and CREF. You select the investments for the College’s contributions as well as your own. You may change your investment allocation at any time through use of TIAA-CREF’s Automated Telephone Service or the internet at www.tiaa.org.

More information about the retirement plan will be made available to you when the College first determines you are eligible to begin participation in the Plan. For further information regarding either plan or if you are already a participant in TIAA-CREF, you may request additional information or a copy of the Summary Plan Description from the human resources office.

Retirement Plan 403(b) (TIAA-CREF)

The College sponsors both a supplemental retirement account (SRA) plan and a defined contribution retirement plan. Participation in both plans is voluntary. Eligible employees may begin participation in and contributing to the SRA after 30 days from the date of hire. The College does not match your contributions to the SRA, but you may contribute to your SRA on a tax-deferred basis under Internal Revenue Service Code 403(b). Tax deferral means that you do not pay current income taxes on the contributions. However, you should expect to pay income taxes on benefits when those are paid to you.

You are eligible to participate in the defined-contribution plan after you complete one year of continuous service. For plan purposes, a year of service is defined as a 12-month period in which you work at least 1,000 hours. You must continue working at least 1,000 hours per year to maintain your eligibility for the defined-contribution plan. Contributions to the defined contribution plan are made by you and the College. If you contribute at least 1% but not more than 4% of salary, the College will equally match your contribution. Both your and the College’s contributions to the defined contribution plan are made on a tax-deferred basis.

You become immediately vested in both the SRA and defined-contribution plans. This means that your accumulation cannot revert to the College. This vesting entitles you to the contributions provided by the College, and to your contributions. The two retirement plans offer a variety of benefit payment options ranging from a lifetime pension income to lump sum payment of the accumulation attributable to your contributions.

The Plan is funded through Retirement Annuity contracts issued by TIAA and CREF. You select the investments for the College’s contributions as well as your own. You may change your investment allocation at any time through use of TIAA-CREF’s Automated Telephone Service or the internet at www.tiaa.org.

More information about the retirement plan will be made available to you when the College first determines you are eligible to begin participation in the Plan. For further information regarding either plan or if you are already a participant in TIAA-CREF, you may request additional information or a copy of the Summary Plan Description from the human resources office.

Roofs and Fire Escapes

Because of danger to individuals, potential liability concerns for the College, and probable damage to roofs, all roofs are off-limits. Fire escapes must be free of personal belongings and clear in the event of a fire alarm. At no time should anyone use a fire escape except during an emergency. A fine of $100 will be assessed to anyone found on a roof or improperly using a fire escape.

Sabbatical Leaves

In accordance with policy adopted by the Board of Trustees, sabbatical leaves at full salary will be granted to faculty members for one or more semesters as determined by the following rules of eligibility: one semester immediately following the conclusion of six (6) years of active teaching as a regular College faculty member; thereafter, one semester after each five (5) years of active teaching.

Faculty members who have become eligible for sabbatical leaves may apply for longer leaves at reduced salary or for longer leaves at greater intervals.

Applications for sabbatical leaves must be made in writing to the Dean of the Faculty at least one semester before the semester when the leave is to commence, and should include some description of the proposed arrangements for covering the field. Notice of such applications shall be posted promptly, so that those affected may have a chance to state objections or make whatever arrangements may be necessary. Faculty members applying for leave should determine jointly with their colleagues and students, particularly those who are or will be on Plan, how work in their areas will be covered, with disagreements to come to the Dean of Faculty. All sabbaticals are at the discretion of the administration, and should teaching needs at the College, or other circumstances, make the granting of such a leave impossible, the faculty member with the longest period of uninterrupted active teaching shall be given priority. Notice of all leaves granted shall be posted promptly, and whenever possible by at least eight weeks before the end of the semester preceding the semester in which the sabbatical will commence.

Faculty members granted sabbaticals should be prepared to indicate the nature of their sabbatical activities and the relationship of those activities to their teaching. It is expected that faculty members will resume their teaching responsibilities at the College for at least one year following the sabbatical. Faculty members with staff appointments and with substantial and continuing teaching responsibilities are eligible for sabbatical leaves on the same schedule as the regular faculty, but only if adequate replacement can be arranged.

Safety and Reporting Accidents

As an employee, you are expected to use safety equipment (where applicable and/or required) and exercise caution and common sense in all work activities. Employees should report any unsafe conditions to their supervisor. In the case of a workplace accident that results in injury, regardless of how insignificant the injury may appear, employees must immediately notify their supervisor and the human resources department. An accident report must be completed by the human resources department and the employee, following every injury. Form #101 should be completed within 24 hours of the injury.

Salaries

Each regular faculty salary is calculated as a base plus an annual increment (step) multiplied by the number of years of full time teaching experience. The base is our entry level tenure track salary. The step implements faculty advancement which occurs annually and serves the purpose of faculty ranks at other institutions.

Sanctions

Remedies or sanctions for violations of the College’s policy against sexual harassment, or its policy against sexual misconduct that does not constitute sexual assault, may include for students:

The following sanctions, or any combination thereof, may be applied to any individual student or group of students for conduct violations:

  • Educational – examples include community service, educational projects, presentations, or workshops related to the violation and designed to assist students in better understanding the impact of their behavior on self and others.
  • Counseling Assessment/Evaluation – commonly recommended to assist the student in better understanding the personal decisions or emotional issues that contributed to their behavior.
  • Restitution – involves the replacement of property or payment for the replacement or repair of property damaged as a result of student behavior.
  • Housing Ban – involves restricting a student from a particular residence hall or all residence halls with the exception of the one in which the student resides.
  • Housing Relocation – if space is available, a student may be moved to a different room or residence hall.
  • Housing Probation – means that another violation may result in expulsion from college housing.
  • Revocation of Housing Privileges – means that the student is removed and banned from college housing.
  • Social Probation – means that another violation may result in the student being allowed on campus only for academic reasons (e.g. classes, library, meeting with faculty).
  • Social Restriction – means the student in banned from campus with the exception of classes, library work, or meetings with advisor/faculty.
  • Suspension – this action results in the involuntary withdrawal of the student from the college, its programs, and facilities for a specified period of time (e.g. semester, academic year).
  • Expulsion – this action results in the permanent separation of the student from the college, its programs, and facilities.

and for faculty or staff:

  • verbal or written warning,
  • a signed contract describing commitment to future behavior,
  • training,
  • counseling,
  • probation,
  • leave of absence with or without pay,
  • dismissal from employment
  • temporary or permanent transfer to a different position, class or academic assignment,
  • reassignment of work or academic work, or
  • alteration of living or work environment.

Any mandated separation of a student from the College for a violation of this Policy will recommend conditions that must be satisfied before the student’s return. In the case that a student is separated from the College, the Panel will consider putting conditions into place which must continue to be met after the student’s return.

Remedies or sanctions for violations of the College’s policies against sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking may include:

  • training,
  • counseling,
  • probation,
  • leave of absence with or without pay,
  • dismissal from employment,
  • suspension from housing,
  • suspension from social activities,
  • suspension from school,
  • expulsion from school,
  • temporary or permanent transfer to a different position, class or academic assignment,
  • and/or reassignment of work or academic work, or alteration of living or work environment.

Schedules and Attendance

The scheduled work time for your position at Marlboro is defined by your job, the nature of your work and the requirements of the department. Schedules vary based on individual positions. Occasionally, circumstances require temporary or ongoing changes to a position’s regular schedule. If the College requires a change, the employees involved will be notified. Employee requested changes in schedule must be in writing and approved by the supervisor in advance.

Employees including exempt staff must be present and ready to work when scheduled. If it is not possible for an employee to work when scheduled, he/she must contact their supervisor before their regularly scheduled shift. As a courtesy, administrative positions should also notify the receptionist in order to direct callers appropriately.

Section I: Allocation of Powers

The Town Meeting of the Marlboro College Community shall follow, in general, the form of the New England Town Meeting, and shall have the power to legislate in the following matters:

  1. It shall have the power to make recommendations to both the administration and the faculty in all areas other than those under its jurisdiction. It shall elect representatives who shall attend appropriate faculty meetings.
  2. It shall formulate and enforce rulings in matters of conduct and safety, as well as rulings for the care of property in the College Community.
  3. It shall elect representatives for the purpose of participating in the formulations and policies relating to the work program.
  4. It shall have power to organize and maintain work projects of a profit making nature that will not conflict with the overall program of the College.
  5. It shall make decisions concerning recreation, recreational facilities, and social programs, in accordance with the general plan of the College.
  6. It has final authority in the disposition of the Community Activity Fund. Faculty and staff shall not vote on such issues.
  7. It shall establish each year a scholarship fund to be known as the Town Meeting Scholarship Fund. At the last Town Meeting of the academic year a percentage of the Community Activity Fund, which shall not be, less than 10% of the total shall be appropriated for this fund for the next academic year. The Town Meeting reserves the right to establish the guidelines for awarding the scholarship when it establishes the amount to be put into the fund.
  8. It shall have representatives on each policy shaping committee of the faculty.
  9. The Town Meeting shall have the power to review any faculty decision on academic policy. This does not include power to review decisions concerning the standing or status of individual students. At the request of the Board of Selectpersons or following presentation of a petition signed by at least fifteen students to the Board of Selectpersons, the Head Selectperson shall present the faculty decision to the Town Meeting. Town Meeting disapproval of such a decision by a majority of those students present shall be binding: that majority for purposes of disapproval shall consist of at least 20% of the student body. Such Town Meeting action must take place within two (2) weeks of term time of the faculty decision being challenged. The faculty may, in Faculty Meeting, overrule the Town Meeting in such a case and reaffirm the original decision by a vote of two thirds of those faculty present at that Faculty Meeting.
  10. Town Meeting may overrule by a majority vote any action by the Board of Selectpersons.
  11. The Spore Amendment‖ (15 April 1968):
    1. Town Meeting shall not establish religion or prohibit the free exercise thereof.
    2. Town Meeting shall not abridge freedom of speech or of the press.
    3. Town Meeting shall not abridge the right of its members to assemble peaceably or to petition it for redress of grievances.
    4. Town Meeting shall not require conformity of personal political opinion to any
      community standard; it shall neither establish nor support collective political opinion on
      matters beyond those enumerated in the Allocation of Powers.
  12. Town Meeting shall make decisions concerning appropriations from the Washer/Dryer Fund. No more than 5%, measured at the beginning of the academic year, may be withdrawn during the course of the full academic year without a two thirds majority of Town Meeting vote with the exception of the work coordinators’ budget.
  13. Town Meeting embraces the college’s environmental mission statement and the environmental ethic that it describes. This ethic shall be taken into consideration in all decisions made by Town Meeting, and by Town Meeting committees and other subsidiary bodies.

This grant of authority to the Town Meeting by the faculty rests on a general assumption that a code of civilized behavior, suitable to adult citizens of a democratic community, will be followed by all members of the Marlboro College Community.

Section II: The College Community

The College Community shall include students, faculty, staff and their spouses, kitchen staff regularly assigned to Marlboro College, and trustees when present. The Moderator may extend to visiting associates and alumni full privileges while they are at Marlboro College.

Section III: Town Meeting Officers

The Officers of the Town Meeting shall be:

  1. Moderator: Shall be elected for a term of one (1) academic semester. Elections for said office shall be held at the last Town Meeting of the preceding semester.
  2. Selectpersons:
    1. Selectpersons shall be elected as follows:
      1. Nominations for a Head Selectperson Elect shall be taken at or before the second to last scheduled Town Meeting of the fall semester, and posted for the week following. Elections shall be held on the first three (3) days of the following week, supervised by the Board of Selectpersons, using the alternative ballot as follows: Voters are asked to indicate their first, second, and third preference for Head Selectperson by indicating each with ―1, ―2, or ―3, before each name, respectively. The tallying of these votes will proceed in the following fashion: If one nominee achieves a true majority in the first tally of all votes marked ―1, they are declared the next Head Selectperson. If not, then that nominee with the least ―1 votes is dropped from the race, and the ―2 preferences on those ballots are then observed in a second tally of all votes. This process of canceling those votes belonging to that nominee with the least votes in each tally, and applying the next preference indicated on each of those ballots to the other nominee continues until one nominee gains a true majority of the vote. Upon request, Selectpersons shall provide absentee ballots. The results shall be posted as soon as possible. The Head Selectperson Elect will automatically become the new Head Selectperson at the start of the Spring Semester, with the intervening period serving as a training session for the position.
      2. Nominations for six Selectpersons shall be taken at the last Town Meeting of the spring semester. Elections shall be held on the first three (3) days of the following week, and be supervised by the departing Board of Selectpersons.
    2. Terms of Selectpersons shall be one (1) full year. A Selectperson may be re elected.
    3. Should a Selectperson resign from their position, a substitute shall be elected as soon as possible, following the pattern of the Australian ballot, to fulfill the responsibility of the departing Selectperson for the remainder of the term of office of the departing Selectperson.
    4. In the event of the incapacity of the Head Selectperson, as determined by the Dean and the Board of Selectpersons, the Board of Selectpersons shall call a special Town Meeting to take nominations for the position of Acting Head Selectperson. Nominations shall be posted for a period of forty eight (48) hours after Town Meeting, at the end of which time an election shall be held. This election, supervised by the Board of Selectpersons, will take place by alternative ballot and checklist. Upon request, Selectpersons shall provide absentee ballots. The result shall be posted immediately. During the forty eight (48) hour interim, immediately upon pronouncement by the Board of Selectpersons of the incapacity of the Head Selectperson, the Treasurer shall assume responsibility as Chairman of the Board of Selectpersons with the power only to organize the Board’s own business and to act as liaison between the Board and the Dean’s office. The duly elected Acting Head Selectperson will assume all the powers and responsibilities of the Head Selectperson designated under Section III, B. 5 7 of the Constitution until the Board of Selectpersons and the Dean pronounce the Head Selectperson capable of assuming their duties.
    5. The functions of the Selectpersons include:
      1. The leadership of the Community, with a view to its general well being;
      2. Responsibility for the proper exercise of those powers which have formally been delegated to the Community Government;
      3. Representation for the interests of the students to the faculty, the officers of the administration, and other bodies;
      4. Advising and counseling individuals as may seem appropriate;
      5. Maintenance of pleasant and hygienic conditions on campus;
      6. Enforcement of Community Bylaws.
    6. The Board of Selectpersons shall:
      1. Meet regularly at announced times while the College is in session; provide opportunity for any member of the Community to discuss matters with the Board;
      2. Summon and attend Town Meetings and prepare agenda and report on the doings of the Board;
      3. Attend open meetings of the Board of Trustees and the faculty;
      4. Meet with officers of the administration at least every other week while the College is in session;
      5. Cooperate with the Dean of Students in the orientation of new students;
      6. Meet with the Dean’s office personnel to decide issues of rooming priority;
      7. Solicit applications and, with the consent of the Director of Plant and Operations, appoint one (1) student to serve as head of the Fire and Safety Commission;
      8. Appoint auditors to examine and report upon the form of the accounts of the Community Activities Fund;
      9. Recommend a Student Activities Fee to the last Town Meeting of the year;
      10. Insure that all elections within the Community take place at the time and in the manner stipulated;
      11. Attend any dormitory meetings at the request of the residents;
      12. Act as Grand Jury in the presentation of Community charges against individuals before the Court. (Note: A Grand Jury is convened at the request of a Public Advocate);
      13. Supervise and appoint, for an indefinite term (after consultation with the President, the Dean of Students, and the Director of Plant and Operations), a Crew Chief for the Dining Hall, whom the College shall pay an appropriate stipend (similar to the highest work grant). See Article VI of the Bylaws;
      14. Have the right to declare any non member of the Community persona non grata and deny visiting privileges to that person for a stated period as outlined in Article IX: Guest Policy.
      15. Cooperate with the Fire Chief in matters of fire safety;
      16. Be responsible for the allotment of the PA system;
      17. Appoint a representative of Selectboard to attend Senior Team meetings.
    7. The Head Selectperson shall have a special position of leadership and general responsibility for the well being of the Community as a whole.
  3. Nominations for a Treasurer Elect shall be taken at or before the second to last Town Meeting of the spring semester. The Treasurer Elect will automatically become the new Treasurer after Commencement, when they will become Treasurer for a term of one year. The Treasurer shall:
    1. Maintain the accounts of the Community Activities Fund and submit them to the auditors/Financial Officers of the College to be audited at the end of each semester;
    2. Obtain the advice of the auditors/Financial Officers of the College as to the form of the accounts;
    3. Maintain an inventory of all durable equipment acquired by the Community, with an account of its present estimated value, and a list of the names of those responsible for its safekeeping;
    4. Render to the Town Meeting an account of the current state of the Community Activities Fund at the request of two (2) members of the Community, provided that forty eight (48) hours notice of the request shall have been given;
    5. Obtain from the Student Accounts Office, as needed, the proceeds of the Student Activities Fee, according to the appropriations made by the Town Meeting, and obtain receipts from the recipients;
    6. Obtain from the Chairperson of the Community Committees their requests for appropriations for the coming academic year, not later than the 7th of May; and to add them to their own requests for washing machines, etc., expenditure and miscellaneous items, including charity and other causes not directly related to the well being of the Community; and transmit the whole budget to the Board of Selectpersons for its approval and for the setting of a Student Activities Fee;
    7. Receive from the Clerk of the Court, the Crew Chief, the Fire Chief, and from all others through whose hands receipts due to the Community Activities Fund pass, such sums as are due, and give receipts for them;
    8. Examine all requests for supplementary appropriations not specified in the budget, and place them on the agenda of a Town Meeting with or without their endorsement. They shall not be authorized to pay money from the Community Activities Fund unless the appropriation has been so placed upon the agenda, except in those cases where, by the ruling of the Moderator, a situation of extreme emergency has arisen;
    9. Be bonded for $3,000. The Treasurer may, after consulting with the Selectboard if possible and at his or her own financial risk, make disbursements of up to $3,000 from the Community Activities Fund in emergencies when in their opinion such disbursement may reasonably be expected to be validated at the next Town Meeting. The Treasurer shall inform the Selectboard of such a disbursement at the next Selectboard meeting;
    10. Receive an expense account equal in amount to their Student Activities Fee;
    11. Serve as member of the Board of Selectpersons;
    12. Inform the community about Budget and Committee Spending at the end of each semester;
    13. Be authorized to sign checks only between Fall Enrollment and Commencement. The Treasurer shall submit all unwritten checks to the Financial Officers of the College by June to be held until Fall Enrollment;
    14. Have all accounts balanced and ready to be audited by Commencement;
    15. Be authorized to sign checks only when they are not the recipient of the check or the check is not made out to cash. When either of these conditions is necessary, it shall be signed by the Head Selectperson;
    16. Train the Treasurer Elect.
  4. Nominations for a Clerk Elect shall be taken at or before the second to last Town Meeting of the spring semester. The Clerk Elect will automatically become the new Town Meeting Clerk after Commencement, when they will become Clerk for a term of one year. The Clerk shall:
    1. Serve as a member of the Board of Selectpersons;
    2. Keep minutes for the Selectpersons;
    3. Keep the minutes for the Town Meeting. Post a list of the Offices and Officers of the Town Meeting, the Committees and their Chairpersons and membership, any proposed amendments to the Constitution, Bylaws, or announcements so designated by the Town Meeting or the procedures of Town Meeting.;
    4. Update and maintain online content relating to Town Meeting and the Selectboard;
    5. Ensure that all changes to the Bylaws and/or the Community Constitution are incorporated, before the following Town Meeting, into an electronic medium accessible to students, faculty, and staff.
  5. Selectpersons, Clerk, and Treasurer shall constitute a permanent body to meet with the faculty, staff, or trustees in matters involving the question of jurisdiction. Selectpersons, Clerk and Treasurer may be recalled by a petition signed by two thirds of the student body, followed by a two thirds vote of Town Meeting. An Officer shall have at least one (1) week’s notice.
  6. Advocates:
    1. Two Advocates from the Town Meeting shall be appointed by the Board of Selectpersons to work with the Coordinator of Student Conduct to protect the integrity of the Community. Together with the Coordinator, the Advocates will be responsible for: initiating Community Conduct cases presented to them by other members of the Community; the correct writing of charges; making an effort to settle cases; and for ensuring that Respondents have been advised of their rights.
    2. Upon appointment, the Advocates shall meet with the Coordinator of Student Conduct to review their responsibilities in the Community Conduct process. The Associate Advocate shall assist the Public Advocate in every Community Court case. A Special Advocate, with full responsibilities of the Public Advocate, shall be appointed by the Board of Selectpersons if they and the Associate Advocate refuse a case.
    3. Each Advocate shall be appointed as Associate Advocate to a one year term. Appointments shall be made at the start of each semester, and only one Associate Advocate shall be appointed at a time. On a vacancy in the office of Public Advocate, the Associate Advocate shall assume this role and a new Associate shall be appointed.
  7. The Town Crier shall announce lectures, concerts and other performances or events that concern the Marlboro Community. They are responsible for providing the Community with (1) a set schedule of when and where announcements will take place, and (2) a substitute Crier is unavailable or off campus at one of the scheduled announcement times. The Town Crier may add to their duties as they see fit. All announcements must be presented to the Town Crier in typed or written form before the appropriate announcement times. The Town Crier will be nominated at the last Town Meeting of each spring semester and will be elected by Australian ballot for a term of one year.
  8. Work Coordinators:
    1. The work coordinators shall oversee and organize voluntary work on campus. They shall:
      1. work with the Director of Plant and Operations, the Director of the Outdoor Program, the Farm Manager, the Selectboard and other groups to maintain a public list of available tasks;
      2. arrange times, materials, and work crews for these tasks to be completed;
      3. maintain a public sign up sheet for volunteers;
      4. coordinate at least one workday each semester;
      5. report in every Town Meeting.
    2. There shall be two work coordinators. Each work coordinator shall be elected by Town Meeting for a term of one year. The terms shall be staggered, one beginning at the start of the fall semester and the other at the start of the spring semester.
    3. The work coordinators shall have a budget of not less than $1000 per year and not more than $2000 per year, taken from the Washer/Dryer fund.

Section IV: Town Meeting

  1. There shall be at least three (3) business meetings each year, one for the purpose of orientation in September, one for mid year reports from all Committees in January, and one to approve the Town Meeting budget for the following year in April. Supplementary meetings may be held by decision of the Selectpersons or by petition of fifteen (15) students. A meeting shall be called within two (2) weeks of the presentation of a petition to the Selectpersons, providing that the petition be presented sufficiently in advance to allow posting of a twenty four hour (24) warning of the meeting to the Community.
  2. A quorum is the number of members present unless the decision to implement or transact such business requires a percentile or fixed number of the Community.

Section V: Community Conduct

The Community Conduct process is intended to ensure that community members abide by the rules and bylaws established under the allocation of powers to Town Meeting in Section I. Any member of the community may bring charges of violations of the bylaws to the Public Advocate and the Coordinator of Student Conduct for a Hearing; ordinarily cases will be processed through the Dean of Students’ Office (Dean) as Incident Reports (IR) generated by Student Life staff. The Coordinator will, whenever appropriate and in consultation with the Dean of Students, attempt to settle minor cases informally by seeking an agreement among parties. The Advocate and Coordinator will conduct a preliminary investigation of the complaint. A person charged (Respondent) with violations of the bylaws will meet with the Public Advocate (appointed by the Board of Selectpersons) and the Coordinator of Student Conduct (appointed by the Dean of Students). The rights of the Respondent, the charges, and the range of possible sanctions will be explained in writing. Cases brought by Student Life staff, including Resident Assistants, will always begin in the Administrative Hearing; in all other cases a Respondent can choose to have their case processed through Community Court or an Administrative Hearing. In all cases, if the Respondent takes responsibility for the violation and harmed parties are willing to participate, they can choose to have their case go through a Restorative Justice conference. If there are multiple Respondents, each Respondent can make their own choice, among the processes available to them, regarding the process by which their case will be resolved. Should a case brought before the Coordinator create the appearance of a conflict of interest, or if the Coordinator cannot fulfill their duties, the Dean, at their discretion, may fulfill the functions of the Coordinator or may appoint a temporary Coordinator. The Dean will have sole discretion in whether to appoint a temporary Coordinator. Administrative Hearings cannot result in suspension or expulsion. If the Coordinator determines, either during or at the conclusion of an Administrative Hearing, that suspension or expulsion may be warranted, the Coordinator will take the case to the Community Court as the Complainant as described below.

  1. COMMUNITY COURT PROCEDURES:
    1. The Court shall consist of seven (7) justices: three (3) students, two (2) staff members, and two (2) faculty. Students interested in serving on the Court will submit letters of intent to the Selectboard. Selectboard will then appoint three students at the end of the spring semester for the following academic year. Faculty are appointed for the academic year by the Dean of Faculty. Staff members are appointed for the academic year by the Dean of Students. Staff
      members who already participate in the Community Conduct process, including the appeals process, or who have campus psychological or health responsibilities shall be ineligible to serve on the Court. At the end of the Spring semester, Town Meeting shall also elect a Court Clerk for a term of one year. The Dean of Students will ensure that a comprehensive training will take place regularly for the members of the Court. Cases will be heard by all seven justices, or their replacements as necessary. Decisions are ordinarily arrived at by consensus, but if consensus is not reached, the decision is by a majority.
    2. Community Court Parties: The following is a list of the various people who may be involved in a Community Court case. Should a case brought before the Court create the appearance of a conflict of interest for a justice, they will recuse themselves. If a student justice recuses themself or be unable to fulfill their responsibilities on the Court, they will be replaced by another student appointed by Selectboard. Should a faculty justice recuse themself or be unable to fulfill their responsibilities on the Court, they will be replaced by another faculty member appointed by the Dean of Faculty. Should a staff justice recuse themselves or be unable to fulfill their responsibility on the Court, they will be replaced by another staff member appointed by the Dean of Students.
      1. Presiding Officer: The Court shall appoint (1) of its members as Presiding Officer. The function of the Presiding Officer is to move the court process through the agenda and to answer procedural questions. They may do so in consultation with the other members of the Court, either in open session or in private.
      2. Complainant: The Complainant is the individual(s) who brings a charge that initiates the Community Conduct process. When the Coordinator refers a case to Community Court, the Coordinator will become the Complainant on behalf of the community.
      3. Public Advocate/Associate Advocate: The Public Advocate and the Associate Advocate together with the Coordinator of Student Conduct, are responsible for the correct writing of charges in accordance with the Handbook, for proper investigation (i.e. gathering sufficient evidence), and for assuring that the accused has been advised of their rights.
      4. Respondent: The Respondent is the individual against whom the Complainant is bringing a charge. This person has the right to have a Consultant present.
      5. Consultant to the Respondent: The Consultant to the Respondent may be any member of the Marlboro College community. The role of the Consultant is to advise and support the Respondent, which may include suggesting a question on behalf of the Respondent, helping to prepare their defense, and providing general support. The Respondent may pause the proceedings at any point either to speak with or to dismiss the Consultant.
      6. Head Selectperson or their designee: the Head Selectperson, by virtue of their special position of leadership and general responsibility for the well being of the Community as a whole, may be present at Community Court Hearings, or may designate someone to perform this role.
      7. Dean of Students: The Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee are also present at Community Court Hearings as a resource, to provide information on past cases, procedures, or sanctions, and to consult with the Court on sanctions that will require their supervision. The Dean of Students also maintains a confidential file of all Court proceedings.
      8. Coordinator of Student Conduct: The Coordinator of Student Conduct will be present in all proceedings arising out of the Administrative Judicial Procedures. In appeals to sanctions imposed in Administrative Hearings, the Coordinator will be called as a witness. In cases in which the Coordinator or Dean has recommended suspension or expulsion, the Coordinator will be the Complainant.
      9. Witnesses: Witnesses may be called by either the Complainant or the Respondent. They may either provide direct information about an event or serve as a character witness. Their testimony will be coordinated before the Hearing by the Public Advocate and Associate Advocate.
      10. Court Clerk: The Court Clerk keeps a written record of both open and closed Hearings (but not of the deliberations). These records are kept by the Dean of Students in a confidential file. The Court Clerk shall also distribute the record and a copy of any sentencing statement to all appropriate parties to the Hearing.
    3. The Court at its discretion may declare the Hearing open, but Hearings are normally closed. The Court normally respects the wishes of the Respondent as to whether the Hearing should be open. Should the Respondent request an open Hearing and the Court agree, the Respondent, if a student, must sign a FERPA waiver provided by the Dean of Students, allowing any and all community members to hear the proceedings of the case. At any point during the proceedings in an open case, the Respondent may ask the Court to close the Hearing.
    4. All court Hearings will begin with a statement of the charges, an overview of the material to be presented, and a list of those to testify. The Respondent may rebut or comment upon the charges immediately, plead guilty, or wait until all the testimony has been heard. The Respondent has the right to hear or see all the evidence presented against them. Witnesses are normally present only for their own testimony, but may be allowed to stay if the Respondent so elects. Only the Court or Public Advocate may question witnesses directly. After the witnesses have been heard, the Head Selectperson, the Dean, the Consultant to the Respondent, and finally the Respondent may address the Court as they see fit. The Head Selectperson may articulate for the Court the impact on the Community of the alleged actions. The Dean often uses this opportunity to restate the seriousness of the alleged action. In cases where the penalty is not specified by the bylaws, the Dean will bring previous, similar cases and their penalties, to the attention of the Court for consideration as precedents.
      1. The deliberations of the Court are conducted in private and are strictly confidential. The Court shall determine its verdict before any discussion of penalty.
      2. When a decision is rendered and sanction(s) imposed, an explanation will be provided in writing with the rationale for the decision, both to clarify the decision for the Respondent and to clarify the basis for future precedent or the reason for departing from past precedent. In the event that the sentence proposed will require the supervision of the Dean of Students (as, for instance, in all cases of suspension, expulsion, or any form of social probation), the Court shall confer with the Dean of Students before announcing the sentence, to insure that the details of the execution of its sentence are both clear and practical. The Respondent is not normally present for such consultation, but may be allowed to be present at the discretion of the Court. Penalties imposed by the Court are final and effective immediately.
  2. ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES:
    1. If the Respondent chooses an Administrative Hearing, the Complainant(s) and the Respondent(s) will be notified in writing at least 48 hours before the time of the Hearing. The notification will include the charge(s), a description of the conduct alleged, and an enumeration of the rights of Complainant(s) and Respondent(s) under this policy.
      1. If a full Hearing is required, Respondent(s) will meet with the Coordinator in the Administrative Hearing to settle the case. Respondents can request a written summary of the evidence against them, to be furnished in the Administrative Hearing. Respondent(s) can respond to the charges against them in writing, also to be furnished in the meeting, but are not required to do so. Complainant(s) are not ordinarily present at Administrative Hearings, but may join if both the Coordinator and the Respondent(s) agree to it. Respondent(s) may ask any community member to act as Consultant in the Administrative Hearing. The Consultant will have no formal role in the Hearing.
      2. If the Coordinator cannot fulfill their duties at the Administrative Hearing, or if the Coordinator recuses themselves, the Dean, at their discretion, may conduct the Hearing themselves, or may appoint a temporary Coordinator to conduct the Hearing. Respondent(s) may request a temporary Coordinator in cases of conflict of interest by writing to the Dean at least 24 hours before the scheduled Hearing. The Dean will have sole discretion in whether to appoint a temporary Coordinator.
    2. All Hearings will begin with a statement of the charges, an overview of the material to be presented, and a list of those to testify. The Respondent may rebut or comment upon the charges immediately, plead guilty, or wait until all the testimony has been heard. The Respondent has the right to hear or see all the evidence presented against them. Witnesses are normally present only for their own testimony, but may be allowed to stay if the Respondent so elects and the Coordinator agrees. Only the Coordinator may question witnesses directly.
      1. All Hearings are held in private and are confidential.
      2. At the conclusion of the Administrative Hearing, the Coordinator will determine the appropriate sanction in consultation with the Dean. If the Coordinator determines that suspension or expulsion may be appropriate sanctions, the Coordinator will take the case to Community Court, as Complainant, according to the procedures specified in the “Community Court” section above. When a decision is rendered and sanction(s) imposed, an explanation will be provided in writing to the Respondent with the rationale for the decision. Penalties imposed by the Coordinator are effective immediately.
  3. RESTORATIVE JUSTICE CONFERENCE:
    1. A Restorative Justice conference is a collaborative decision-making process that includes harmed parties, offenders, and others who are seeking to hold offenders accountable and repair harm. Led by two trained facilitators selected by the Coordinator of Student Conduct, the conference focuses on the facilitated dialogue between the Respondent(s) and harmed parties. After a discussion of the harm, the parties determine what steps the Respondent(s) can take to repair the harm.
    2. The goal of the Restorative Justice Process is to assist Respondent(s) to:
      1. Accept and acknowledge responsibility for their offenses;
      2. To the best of their ability, repair the harm they caused to harmed parties and the community;
      3. Work to rebuild trust by showing understanding of the harm, addressing personal issues, and building positive social connections.
    3. The Dean of Students will ensure a comprehensive training is offered for community members interested in facilitating Restorative Justice conferences and that there is an available pool of trained Restorative Justice facilitators.
    4. If both facilitators determine that the Restorative Justice conference cannot be appropriately resolved, they will refer the Respondent back to the Public Advocate and Coordinator.
  4. Cases will ordinarily be deferred or suspended during a criminal investigation by law enforcement officials, when charges are being brought outside the College, or when the actions alleged are the subject of a civil suit, pending resolution of the outside investigation, case, or suit.
  5. APPEALS
    1. Any defendant who believes that due process has been violated or that the penalty imposed is disproportionate may request that the Dean’s Advisory Committee review the procedures followed in reaching the decision. This request must be made in writing within five (5) working days from the date of the decision. Should the Dean’s Advisory Committee find that due process has been violated or that the penalty seems disproportionate, they shall issue instructions to reconsider the case in light of those findings. Either the Coordinator or Court, whoever heard the original case, may correct any process error and either reach a new verdict, impose a different penalty, or reaffirm the earlier decision, with additional explanation. On appeal, no suspension or expulsion may be imposed until the Dean’s Advisory Committee and the Coordinator or Court (whoever heard the original case) agree. A decided case may be appealed directly to the Coordinator or Court, after consultation with the Advocate and Coordinator, where relevant new evidence arises, provided that such new evidence was clearly unavailable through reasonable investigation at the time of the original Hearing.
  6. JURISDICTION
    1. Community Conduct Procedures shall address the following:
      1. Violation of the rules promulgated by Town Meeting, including:
        1. Alcohol and Other Drugs: Failure to comply with the Alcohol and Other Drug Policy.
        2. Fire Safety: Failure to comply with the College’s Fire Regulations.
        3. Firearms: Failure to comply with the College’s Firearms Regulations.
        4. Smoking: Failure to comply with the College’s Smoking Ban.
        5. Motor Vehicle: Failure to comply with the College’s Motor Vehicle Regulations.
      2. Theft and Vandalism: Misappropriation of personal or College property, or causing damage to personal or College property through negligence or deliberate intent.
      3. Trespassing: Unauthorized entry, use, or occupation of College facilities that are locked, closed, or otherwise restricted as to use.
      4. Bullying and Intimidation: Any electronic, verbal, written, or physical act or series of acts which substantially interferes with a community member’s education, employment, or full participation in the college experience.
      5. Discrimination: Any act or failure to act that is based upon an individual or group’s actual or perceived status included in the College’s non-discrimination statement that limits or denies the ability to participate in or benefit from the College’s educational programs or activities.
      6. Endangerment: Any physical intimidation, act of violence, or conduct which threatens or endangers the health, safety, or well-being of any person or group.
      7. Harassment (non-sexual): Any conduct (physical, verbal, graphic, written, or electronic) that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to interfere unreasonably with or limit the ability of another individual to participate in or benefit from the activities, programs, and services provided by the College, or has the purpose of creating an intimidating or hostile environment.
      8. Unauthorized Use of Electronic or Other Devices: Making an audio or video record of any person while on College premises without his/her prior knowledge, or without his/her effective consent when such a recording is likely to cause injury or distress. This includes, but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person in any place where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy.
      9. Violation of Library Rules.
      10. Conduct Prejudicial to the Best Interests of the College: Any conduct that is considered to be inconsistent with the College’s vision, mission, and expectation for members of the community.
        1. Community Court will have sole jurisdiction over the following:
          1. Contempt of Court.
          2. Interpretation of Town Meeting rules.
          3. Determination of constitutionality of Town Meeting Laws and Bylaws.
  7. POSSIBLE SANCTIONS
    1. The following sanctions, or any combination thereof, may be applied to community member(s) for conduct violations:
      1. Educational: examples include community service, educational projects, presentations, or workshops related to the violation and designed to assist community members in better understanding the impact of their behavior on self and others.
      2. Counseling Assessment/Evaluation: commonly recommended to assist the student in better understanding the personal decisions or emotional issues that contributed to their behavior.
      3. Restitution/Fines: involves the replacement of property or payment for the replacement or repair of property damaged as well as fines assessed
      4. Housing Ban: involves restricting a student from a particular residence hall or all residence halls with the exception of the one in which the student resides.
      5. Housing Relocation: if space is available, a student may be moved to a different room or residence hall.
      6. Housing Probation: means that another violation may result in expulsion from college housing.
      7. Revocation of Housing Privileges: means that the student is removed and banned from college housing.
      8. Social Probation: means that another violation may result in the student being allowed on campus only for academic reasons (e.g. classes, library, meeting with faculty).
      9. Social Restriction: means the student is banned from campus with the exception of classes, library work, or meetings with advisor/faculty.
      10. Suspension: this action results in the involuntary withdrawal of the student from the college, its programs, and facilities for a specified period of time (e.g. semester, academic year).
      11. Expulsion: this action results in the permanent separation of the student from the college, its programs, and facilities.

Section VI: Amendments to the Constitution

The Constitution may be amended as follows: The proposed amendments shall be offered and read at one Town Meeting, and acted upon by the next, after an interval of at least one (1) week. The amendment shall be approved by not less than a two thirds majority of those present at said meeting, and by a number of those present equal to not less than thirty percent of the total number of active faculty, staff, and students. In any proceedings which require a vote of thirty percent of the total number of faculty, staff, and students and in which the faculty will not vote because the issue is to come before the Faculty Meeting, the thirty percent requirement will be reduced to a number equal to thirty percent of the total number of students and staff.

Section VII: Town Meeting Bylaws

Other Community matters shall be regulated by Bylaws passed by a majority of the Town Meeting. The amendment or repeal of a Bylaw may be proposed at one meeting, but may not be voted upon until the following meeting.

Senior Team

Senior Team are those so designated by the President (currently Dean of Admissions, Provost and Dean of Faculty, Dean of Students, Chief External Relations Officer, Director of Plant & Operations, Chief Planning and Budget Officer, Dean of the Graduate School of Professional Studies, Assistant to the President and the President). A faculty liaison and a student liaison–either the Head Selectperson, if a student, or one of the student representatives to the Board of Trustees–are invited to participate in Senior Team meetings.

Service Animal Policy

Service animals will be permitted on campus when needed as an accommodation. The animal must be licensed and have an up to date health statement, including vaccinations, from a licensed veterinarian. The animal should wear some type of commonly recognized identification symbol and be leashed and quiet at all times. A service animal may be excluded from campus when that animal’s behavior poses a direct threat to the health and safety of others, or is not being used as an accommodation. When a service animal is determined out of control or disruptive as reported by students, staff or faculty, the infraction will be treated on an individualized basis. The student will be responsible for any damages incurred to property, as well as ensuring the safety, health, and behavior of the animal. For more information see Article V: On-Campus Animal Regulations in the bylaws for details of our animal policy. https://nook.marlboro.edu/public/governance/handbooks/constitution

Short-Term Disability

Short-term disability is available to eligible employees if you are temporarily unable to work because of sickness or injury as documented by a qualified health care provider. All regular and academic calendar staff members working at least 30 hours per week are eligible for a short-term disability income benefit after 30 days from date of hire. This benefit is fully funded by the College, not by an insurance company. All accumulated sick time must be used first. Following the use of all available sick time, employees will receive full basic earnings for up to 20 working days or until the employee is eligible to return to work, whichever comes first. Thereafter, a benefit equal to ⅔ (or 66.67%) of basic earnings will be paid until the employee is either eligible to return to work or until 90 calendar days from the first day of a qualifying sickness or injury. The maximum monthly benefit will not exceed $5,000.00. For more details, consult the plan documents.

Sick Time Eligibility

Marlboro College encourages you to stay home when you are sick, for your own sake as well as the health of others. If you are a full-time regular staff member, you earn one sick day per month to a maximum of 12 in a 12-month period, which may be used in increments of full or partial days if you:

  • Are unable to be at work as scheduled because you are ill or injured,
  • Must care for a sick or disabled family member,
  • Attend a medical appointment for yourself or a dependent.

Unused sick time accumulates to a maximum of 40 days. Sick time may not be used as a substitute or supplement for vacation time. Supervisors may request medical documentation of the inability to attend work in cases of frequent or extended use of sick time for medical reasons. Unused sick time is not paid when a staff member’s employment with Marlboro College ends.

Smoking Policy

To protect the health of all community members, and in accordance with state statutes, the College prohibits the possession of lighted tobacco products in any form in all indoor places of public access and in all indoor workplaces. Smoking shall be permitted outdoors and in any space specifically designated as a “Smoking Permitted Area”, such as the outdoor smoking pavilion.

Special Fees

All charges are subject to change and payable in advance.

Matriculated Students

  • Part-time students: per credit: $1,329
  • Each credit, including tutorials, over the maximum of 18 credits: per credit: $1,329
  • Each audit over the maximum of 18 credits: $500
  • Materials fees for Visual Arts courses: $20-100
  • In absentia 1 & 5, per semester: $19,935
  • In absentia 2,3 & 4*: per semester at another institution, continuing student $500
  • *In absentia 4: fee for credit by examination, per credit: $665
  • Fee for Reinstatement on Plan: $300
  • Summer work with Marlboro faculty for credit: rate per credit (8 credit maximum) $1,329

Non-Matriculated Students

  • Graduates of Marlboro, per credit: $665
    Note: Application is made to the Admissions Office. Tutorials are not offered at this rate.
  • Materials fees for Visual Arts courses: $20-100
  • Part-time students per semester per credit (maximum of 8 credits per semester) or per credit over the maximum 18: $1,329
  • Auditors: Fee per course (maximum of two courses per semester): $500

Note: Senior Citizens, 65 years of age or older, may audit one course per semester without charge by arrangement with the Dean of Faculty and the instructor. Graduates of Marlboro College may audit up to two courses per semester without charge by arrangement with the Dean of Faculty, the instructor and the Director of Alumni Affairs. Emeritus faculty may take classes at the college free of charge.

Staff-Taught Courses

The Faculty recognizes that many members of the staff have areas of academic competence that may support a teaching role in our curriculum or in support of the academic work of particular students. Where appropriate, and when such teaching will not impinge upon their staff responsibilities, staff may propose teaching in accordance with the following provisions.

  1. Staff who are members of the Faculty ex officio may teach courses or tutorials in an area of their academic competence.
  2. Staff who are not members of the Faculty may participate in cooperative team-teaching with faculty members. “Team-teaching” implies direct and continuous participation in the course by the faculty member.
  3. Staff who are not members of the Faculty may propose to the Dean of Faculty and the Curriculum Committee teaching a course in an area of their academic competence. Such a proposal should outline the proposed course, with a course description and a syllabus. The proposal should describe the relation of the proposed course to the curriculum and should specify any coordinating work with members of the Faculty. The proposal should also have the support of the staff member’s supervisor. Once the Dean and the Curriculum Committee approve the course offering, the staff member teaching it serves as the faculty of record for that course and may attend closed Faculty Meeting. Members of the staff may offer tutorials only in compliance with college policy on tutorials by non-members of the Faculty.
  4. Other staff with demonstrated mastery in a particular area may teach a course for credit under the supervision of a Faculty member. Typically, such courses will not exceed two credits. The staff teacher must present a completed application, including a course description and syllabus to the Faculty member, then to the Curriculum Committee for review and approval. The Faculty member is responsible for evaluating the work of students and for granting credit. The sponsor is expected to monitor the course by meeting regularly with the staff teacher and by attending the course at least occasionally.
  5. Teaching support staff may offer tutorials to students on Plan in the areas of their expertise. They may offer courses with the approval of the Dean of Faculty in consultation with area faculty and may attend closed Faculty Meeting when offering instruction for credit

All proposals for courses must be made sufficiently in advance for the Dean and the Curriculum Committee to complete their approval process by the deadlines for course descriptions. A previously-taught course, successfully reviewed, may be approved for re-offer by the Dean of Faculty, with the acquiescence of the Curriculum Committee.

Reviews of Staff-Taught Courses

The teaching in all courses is subject to review by the Committee on the Faculty. Courses taught by staff who are Faculty members are reviewed by the Committee. Those taught by staff who are not members of the Faculty are reviewed by the Dean of Faculty, with the acquiescence of Committee. Those taught by staff under the supervision of or in collaboration with a Faculty member are reviewed by the Dean of Faculty with the supervising or collaborating Faculty member, with the acquiescence of Committee.

Student ATM Service

The College encourages students to have their own checking account. Having a local bank allows students to cash a check or use a debit card at the campus ATM and at many local businesses; there are no other facilities to access funds on campus. There are several banks in the Brattleboro/Wilmington area, (Chittenden Bank, Key Bank, Merchants Bank and TD Bank to name a few). Representatives from area banks will be on campus during the “Stuff to Do” Fair, usually held during the first week of September should you wish to open an account.

Student Mail

Student mailboxes are located on the ground floor of the Campus Center. Box combinations are assigned by the Director of Mail Services. Information including combinations and addressing procedures are sent to each new student before enrollment day. Mail is distributed twice a day, Monday through Friday. There are no mail services available on Saturday. Any mail too large for mailboxes is held in the mailroom located in the basement of Mather. Students will receive a notification slip in their box which must then be presented for receipt of the package. Assistance with outgoing mail and packages is available. Mail will not:

  • be given to anyone other than the addressee;
  • be held for any student who is no longer enrolled at the College;
  • be delivered to another student’s mailbox.

Student mail will not be available during vacation periods. Students who wish their mail forwarded during vacations must leave a forwarding address with the mail services office. Mail which cannot be forwarded for any reason will be returned to sender or disposed of.

Student Records

All records, including academic records from other institutions, test scores, etc., sent to Marlboro College become part of the official student file and can neither be returned nor duplicated for any purpose.

 

Student Residences

Student Residences

Assignment of Rooms

Cleaning

Damage

Furniture in Rooms

Keys

Leaving Overnight

  Student Residences

Marlboro residence halls are small living units ranging from apartments (for upper-class students mostly) to dormitories housing 12 to 30 people each. They tend to function more like homes than institutional housing. Students must work together to develop and enforce policies, to create a welcome environment, and to maintain the cleanliness of the buildings.

At the beginning of each semester, the ground rules for each living unit (quiet hours, cleaning, parties, etc.) are developed by all the residents into a document called the Dorm Charter. In buildings with Resident Assistants, the RA will help facilitate this process, but it is up to each member of a house to participate and enforce these rules.

  Assignment of Rooms

Marlboro College requires new students to live on campus for their first academic year as long as they meet the deposit deadline. This is in the interest of a socially integrated community and enhanced success of our incoming students. Exceptions to this requirement must be sent, in writing, to the Assistant Dean of Students/Director of Housing.

Near the end of each semester, the administration shall determine which rooms and apartments are to be made available to students in the following year.

  Cleaning

Each residential unit is to be kept in order by its residents. We do have a professional cleaning crew for general upkeep (bathroom and common area cleaning under normal use conditions). It is important that parties and other gatherings be cleaned up by those students in attendance in order to avoid excess cleaning charges. In addition, kitchens should be cleaned after use.

All hallways, stairwells, and common areas need to be kept clear of personal belongings. This is both to enhance the cleanliness of the building and to provide safe fire egress. Trash and recyclables must be similarly placed in their proper receptacles outside the building.

Students are responsible for the condition of their rooms. When moving out of a room (either to another room or off campus for any reason) it is the student’s responsibility to remove all belongings and clean the room.

  Damage

Plant and Operations Office personnel will inspect every student’s room at periodic intervals during the year. Any damage to the room or to the furniture and fixtures will be charged to the student’s bill. If this bill is not paid, neither diplomas nor transcripts will be issued and continued registration is jeopardized. Damage to common areas, unless attributable to specific individuals, will be the responsibility of all residents of the building. For this reason, students should take extra care when non-residents are present in the common areas.

  Furniture in Rooms

Dormitory rooms are furnished with beds, desks, chairs and dressers. Students may bring curtains and lamps for their rooms. Electric blankets, clocks, coffee makers, televisions, radios and stereos in good working condition are also permitted. Electric heaters, stoves, hot plates, “immersion heaters” and most other appliances are not permitted. Waste receptacles must be metal. We wish to avoid fire hazards and unnecessary consumption of electricity. There are small but adequate kitchen facilities for preparing snacks in some dormitories. For safety reasons, no one is allowed to sleep in any building that is not a dormitory.

  Keys

Keys to dormitory rooms will be issued by Plant and Operations. Lost keys should be reported immediately to Plant and Operations. For any key that is not returned upon moving out of a room, the student will be charged a $75 replacement fee.

  Leaving Overnight

Resident students who leave campus overnight are requested to notify the RA of their destination so that they may be contacted in case of an emergency.

Student Status & Change Of Status

Marlboro students are normally enrolled on a full-time, matriculated basis. The Dean of Faculty may grant requests from returning students who wish to enroll on a part-time and/or non-matriculated basis.

The faculty reserves the right to reclassify as non-matriculated any student who qualifies for dismissal.

In Absentia

Leave of Absence

Medical Leave of Absence

Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Policy of Students who have separated from the College

Exit Interviews

Readmittance

  In Absentia

A student is given this status while living away from campus and, in most cases, working on his or her Plan of Concentration. In Absentia status must be submitted for approval two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term. After this date, the Dean of Faculty will grant Absentia status only in cases of emergency and unforeseeable personal, family or medical hardship, or for reasons beyond the control of the student.

Students in Absentia must be in good academic standing in the semester prior to their departure, and all approvals are conditional on end-of-term standing. The College is not responsible for commitments made by students in anticipation of approval for Absentia status.

A student who anticipates that he or she may not qualify for Absentia by reason of good standing may, with the support of his or her advisor/Plan sponsor, apply for an exception to this policy by submitting a statement of appeal to the Committee for Global Engagement (for international Absentias) or to the Dean of Faculty (for domestic Absentias.) The Committee or the Dean will meet with the student, the advisor, and other faculty directly involved to assess the advisability of allowing the student to participate and will accept or deny the appeal. The eligibility of students whose good-standing is affected by incompletes or missing grades will be determined by the Dean in consultation with the student’s advisor.

There are five types of Absentia:

In Absentia #1

Field work with credit awarded by Marlboro College under the sponsorship of the advisor or Plan sponsor. The student is charged full tuition. Payment is due before the work begins. A student will be considered In Absentia #1 only after payment has been arranged and the registration form, with accompanying program description, has been filed with the Registrar. The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College according to the number of credits undertaken, and may continue to receive appropriate federal and state financial aid. The World Studies Program Internship is a special case of In Absentia #1; additional requirements may apply.

A student who wishes to apply for this status must work out a detailed program of study with his or her Plan sponsor well in advance of the end of the prior semester. This program must identify the academic components, their credit weighting, the work to be submitted for evaluation, and the timing of submission. The work must be designed so that the sponsor can assess progress at midterm and at the end of the term. Work must be turned in by the first Faculty Meeting of the following semester to ensure that full credit is earned. The sponsor may set earlier deadlines. (See Academic Credit.) When a student’s Absentia 1 program of study includes Marlboro faculty other than the Plan sponsor, the student must convene a meeting of participating faculty to review the proposal and assess maters of coherence, feasibility, and oversight. The Plan sponsor may not sign the Absentia 1 paperwork until this meeting has occurred. The World Studies internship proposal review is a special case of this process.

In Absentia #2

This status is granted to a Marlboro student enrolled as a non-matriculated or special student at another accredited degree-granting institution who seeks prior approval for credits to transfer to Marlboro. Prior approval also allows a student to maintain financial aid eligibility. Students must request that official transcripts from the visited institution be sent to the Registrar for transfer credit evaluation. A grade of C- or better is required in order for a course to transfer. Students should not elect Pass/Fail grading if given the option. See Consortium Agreement, below.

In Absentia #3

This is a study abroad status granted to a Marlboro student who wishes to enroll in an accredited (ministry of education approved) foreign institution and have a credit equivalency transfer to Marlboro. Since foreign institutions have different systems for measuring course work, a credit equivalency determination is needed to meet American credit standards. Information needed to evaluate an equivalency includes the length of a term or session, the number of weeks per session or term, the number of contact hours per week in each class, and what constitutes a full-time program at the institution. In addition, a definition of the grading system used and description of the type of official report which will be submitted as documentation of work completed are needed before approval can be granted.

In Absentia #2 and #3

The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid if a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up with the school at which the student will be taking courses. Institution-based aid (Marlboro Grant) is not awarded for in absentia work other than Marlboro’s direct exchange programs. Arrangements for the consortium/contractual agreement are made through the Financial Aid Office.

In Absentia #4

In certain exceptional cases, where a student on Plan wishes to enroll in a non-degree granting unaccredited program which the Plan sponsor and the Dean of Faculty deem equivalent to an accredited program, the student may petition for approval to have Marlboro credit granted by examination. The petition, with supporting detail (academic components identified with credits), must be approved in advance, both by the Registrar and the student’s Plan Sponsor.

The student must submit a document summarizing the program of study before the end of the term preceding in absentia. The fee for credit by examination is $658 per credit. (In unusual circumstances, the rate may be negotiated downward with the Dean of Faculty.)

In Absentia #5

This status is granted to a Marlboro student enrolled in a Marlboro College affiliated study away program. The student is considered enrolled at the full-time tuition rate at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid. Institution-based financial aid is available for In Absentia 5 students.

The student must apply for in absentia status through the Dean of Faculty and must submit the appropriate Plan application and academic registration form before the term(s) In Absentia. There is a $500 administrative fee for In Absentia #2, #3, and #4 status.

Application forms for an In Absentia status are available on the web or outside the Registrar’s Office.

Marlboro College Policy for Requests for Foreign Travel on Absentia #1, #3, #4 (see Study Abroad)

  Leave of Absence

Students in good academic standing (12 credits of C- or better) may apply to the Dean of Faculty for a leave of absence of up to one year. Application for leaves of absence must be submitted for approval two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term. After this date, the Dean of Faculty will grant Leaves of Absence only in cases of emergency and unforeseeable personal, family or medical hardship, or for reasons beyond the control of the student. Leaves of absence are not usually granted to freshmen, nor are they given during the semester, except in special hardship cases. Leaves are normally semester-long but may be granted for up to a year. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) or outside the Registrar’s Office. The applicant must be convinced (and convince the Dean) that the leave is necessary to his or her academic or intellectual development. He or she must have every intention of returning and must anticipate any re-entry problems which may be caused by the leave. Investigation of probable courses available to the student upon his or her return often proves useful. The student should also consult the Financial Aid Office, if he or she is receiving loans or other aid. Completed Leave of Absence forms must be filed in the Registrar’s Office.

To hold a place on their expected return date, students taking a leave of absence must pay a $400 enrollment deposit. Students who withdraw from leave will not receive a refund of the enrollment deposit.

A student who does not return to the College after an absence of one year (on leave or in absentia) will be withdrawn from the College. Once a student is withdrawn, he or she must apply for re-admission through the Dean of Faculty.

  Medical Leave of Absence

A medical leave of absence may be granted by the Dean of Students in consultation with the Medical Staff. A medical leave may be granted for no more than two consecutive semesters, including the semester in which such leave is first granted, before the student is considered to have withdrawn. The Dean of Students has the authority to grant readmission to the College from a medical leave after consultation with the Medical Staff. An approved application for a medical leave of absence is filed with the Registrar. Students granted or placed on medical leave of absence receive a grade of WD (withdrawn) for those courses they do not complete.

  Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Students who do not intend to return to Marlboro after their current semester must complete a Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College form and arrange for exit interviews with the Director of Academic Advising and the Office of Financial Aid, if receiving aid. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) and outside the Registrar’s Office; completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

  Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Students who wish to withdraw from the College after classes have begun (for whatever reason) must complete a Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College form and arrange for exit interviews with the Director of Academic Advising and the Office of Financial Aid, if receiving aid. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) and outside the Registrar’s Office; completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

  Exit Interviews

Students who leave the College (for whatever reason) must complete the appropriate withdrawal forms (see above) and arrange for an Exit Interview with the Director of Academic Advising. This interview is intended to give the College as much information as possible about the reasons for withdrawal and give the student an opportunity to express concerns about any phase of his or her time at Marlboro.

  Policy of Students who have separated from the College

Students who have withdrawn from the College or who have been separated from the College by dismissal or administrative withdrawal are no longer members of the Marlboro College Community. They are expected to absent themselves from campus and to visit only in compliance with the College’s guest policy established by Town Meeting. Any questions about this expectation should be directed to the Dean of Students. Failure to abide by this expectation may adversely affect a decision whether to readmit.

  Readmittance

A student who wishes to return to the College must apply for readmission, in writing, to the Dean of Faculty. Readmission will be determined by the Dean after consideration of the reasons for withdrawal. Readmission will be contingent on settling any past-due accounts with the College. There is no separate fee for readmittance.

Readmission following academic dismissal normally is predicated on 2 semesters of academic work elsewhere at C or better.

Students Not Eligible For Aid

Students on leave are not eligible for financial aid. Students studying in absentia at another institution are not eligible for federal and state financial aid from Marlboro College unless a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up in advance with the school at which the student will be studying. (Marlboro Grant may be available for students studying on absentia 1.) See In Absentia under Changes of Status.

Study Abroad

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to include study abroad in their academic program. International experience brings many benefits, among them second-language fluency, exposure to global issues, increased self-confidence, and new friends from diverse cultures. Many Marlboro students in recent years have found that such an experience added a valuable component to their Plans of Concentration. There are many ways you can study abroad while at Marlboro:

  • Field trips led by Marlboro faculty: These vary depending on student and faculty interest.
  • Independent research abroad: Plan students may design a semester of independent study abroad and complete credits on absentia status. Absentia proposals must be approved by faculty sponsors and the Dean of Faculty.
  • Study abroad programs through other institutions (such as The School for International Training are also available).

Marlboro accepts transfer credit only from accredited study abroad programs. Representatives from programs where other Marlboro student have studied successfully are invited to campus several times each year to meet with students over lunch in the dining hall. Catalogues and guides to study abroad programs are available from the Office for International Services. The Director of International Services also serves as the College’s study abroad advisor and can offer guidance on choosing a program.

Students studying abroad should consult the Financial Aid office well before departure to ensure that financial arrangements are in order. The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid if a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up with the school through which the student will be taking courses abroad. Institution-based aid (Marlboro Grant) is not awarded for study abroad outside the Absentia #1 model.

Policy For Requests For Foreign Travel On Absentia #1, #3, #4

Marlboro’s mission is to support independent learning and foster a global perspective. As part of that mission, we encourage a variety of experiences abroad. Given the variety of concerns students will face in preparation for travel, we have designed the following guidelines to help students prepare to travel abroad safely.

Marlboro College students often travel to a foreign country as part of their academic program. Students should be aware that the College may restrict travel to places the College deems to be unstable and unsafe. In order to assess safety concerns fairly and completely, we ask that students preparing to travel abroad write a proposal stating their intentions for travel and the precautions they have made to ensure safety. This proposal should demonstrate their awareness of the safety concerns specific to the host community they propose to visit and provide a detailed list of the precautions they plan to take to address these concerns. Students preparing to travel should then schedule a meeting to discuss this proposal with their Advisor as well as the Director of International Services and Director of World Studies.

The following material will be considered along with the student’s written proposal and the completed Absentia proposal:

  • Travel warnings and advisories issued by the U.S. Department of State;
  • Recommendations acquired by contacting the host country’s embassy;
  • Information garnered from other study abroad programs and other relevant organizations, such as the School for International Training, Living Routes, and Peace Corps, as well as the specific organizations the student proposes to work with;
  • Advisories from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization.

When considering proposals from students planning to travel as part of their academic program, the Advisor, the Director of International Services and Director of World Studies will consider the information available regarding the safety of the proposed travel. Marlboro may suspend approval for travel in locations it deems unsafe. Such decisions will be made by Marlboro College’s Dean of Faculty, the Director of World Studies and the Committee for Global Engagement, in consultation with the advisor and the faculty of students whose plans may be affected by such action. A student’s proposed travel to a place listed on the U.S. Department of State warning list will not be approved unless the student and their parents (or guardians) sign an Assumption of Risk and Release from Liability form, and a Special Waiver for Student Travel to “Travel Warning” Regions. Students studying abroad and earning academic credit assume all risks of that travel.

If the College becomes aware, after the initial approval of student travel on Absentia #1, #3 or #4, that circumstances in the host community (or destination) have deteriorated, the College reserves the right to relinquish approval and withhold academic credit.

Summer Academic Work

Students may undertake up to 8 credits of summer academic work with Marlboro College faculty by special arrangement. Charges are on a per credit basis (see Special Fees). Tuition is shared equally by the faculty member and the College. The student must register with both the Director of Student Accounts and the Registrar. Approval is through the Dean of the Faculty. Arrangements must be completed and the Dean of Faculty notified before the final Faculty Meeting of the spring semester.

The faculty member will be responsible for supervising and evaluating the student’s work according to usual academic standards. Upon completion of the summer course, the faculty member must submit a course title, a course description, credit and grade to the Registrar.

Summer Hours

The College will close five Fridays during the summer. These days will be posted on the Marlboro College website along with the Holiday calendar. In some cases it is highly impractical for a staff member to take the designated summer Friday, the supervisor may offer an alternative equivalent option for the department or staff member. Business travel that takes place on summer Fridays should be discussed with the supervisor. Summer Fridays are not applicable for staff members not regularly scheduled to work on Friday.

Supplemental Grants

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are awarded from funds allocated to the College by the United States Government; they are given to students with the greatest financial need who would be unable to attend Marlboro without this assistance. A student may qualify for up to $1,500 from SEOG in a given year. Students may be Pell Grant eligible in order to potentially qualify for SEOG.

Support Animal Policy

Support animals will only be permitted in campus housing when supported by sufficient documentation and deemed a reasonable accommodation for a student with a disability. All health and behavioral guidelines will be the same as for service animals. Requests for a therapy pet in housing must be made at least two months prior to the start of the semester. For more information see Article V: On-Campus Animal Regulations in the bylaws for details of our animal policy. https://nook.marlboro.edu/public/governance/handbooks/constitution

Support for Scholarly Activities

Limited funds are available for travel to professional meetings, for summer research, and for similar professional development. These include annual competitive awards for research and performance. Application for funds must be made to the Dean of Faculty. The College provides no funds for membership in professional organizations by individual members of the faculty.

Suspensions & Expulsions

In addition to the Faculty’s authority to dismiss or discontinue students for academic failure or failure to perform, in specified situations, Marlboro College personnel or the Community Court may suspend or expel a student from the college. Suspension is a separation from the college for a specified period of time, usually with conditions that must be satisfied before the student is granted readmission to the College. Expulsion is a permanent separation from the College. The aim in these policies is to maintain a healthy academic community for all students, faculty, and staff while affording students appropriate elements of due process; in each case, students will receive documented notice of a proposed action, with an opportunity to respond and an avenue for appeal. The situations in which the power to suspend or expel may be exercised are as follows:

Emergency Suspension or Removal

Removal of Members of the Public

Dean of Faculty

Dean of Students

Recommendations from the Sexual Harassment Panel

 

Community Court

 

 Emergency Suspension or Removal

In extraordinary circumstances, authorized members of the administration or faculty may suspend a student or require the removal from campus of an employee prior to any hearing before the College body ordinarily responsible for disciplinary action. The President, the Dean of the Faculty and Graduate Education, the Dean of Students, or a person expressly designated by any of these administrators, is authorized to act in such circumstances, subject to the following conditions:

  1. Interim suspension or removal from campus may be imposed only: a) to ensure the safety or well-being of members of the College community or the protection of College property; b) to ensure the student’s or employee’s own physical safety or well-being; or c) to prevent serious disruption of, or interference with, the operations of the College.
  2. During the interim suspension or removal, the student or employee may be denied access to College properties, activities, or privileges for which he or she might otherwise be eligible, as the President or the other designated person may determine.
  3. Any community member suspended or removed from campus shall be notified in writing of the terms of the suspension (for students) or removal (for employees) and of the reasons for it, with a description of the normal procedures that will be followed later. The interim suspension or removal from campus does not replace the normal procedures. Notice of the time, date, and place of any subsequent hearing should be given as soon as practical. Any such subsequent hearing shall address the issue of harm or threat of harm without prejudice due to the interim action.

 Removal of Members of the Public

Any member of the Administration (including all staff) or of the Faculty may require the departure or removal of a member of the public: a) to ensure the physical safety or well-being of members of the College community or preservation of College property; b) to ensure the person’s own physical safety and well-being; or c) to prevent the disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the College. If the threat to the College is likely to be sustained, the matter will be referred to the College Selectboard to consider Persona Non Grata status.

 Dean of Faculty

Since Marlboro College is an academic community, in which students are responsible for active academic engagement, the Dean of Faculty, in consultation with the Dean of Students and relevant faculty members, may suspend, effective immediately, any student who fails to attend classes or to engage in academic work and who is therefore making it difficult for other students or members of the faculty to engage in the academic life of the College. Notice of this suspension and the reasons for it must be provided to the student in writing. The Dean should report such suspensions to the next regular Faculty meeting.

Appeal – A student suspended for the reasons above may appeal the suspension in writing to the Dean of Faculty within five (5) calendar days from the date of suspension. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of suspension; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Dean of Faculty; or, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct. The Dean will then convene an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, and the student’s advisor or another faculty member of the student’s choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, including eligibility for suspension. The ad hoc committee will report to the next faculty meeting, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee on the student’s appeal. If the ad hoc committee is recommending against the suspension, the student shall be reinstated pending action by the full Faculty.

 Dean of Students

Extraordinary and Disruptive Behavior

The Dean of Students, in consultation with the Medical Staff, the Dean of Faculty, the faculty members on the Dean’s Advisory Committee, and the student’s academic advisor, may suspend, effective immediately, any student whose behavior is an extraordinary and disruptive drain on the community’s resources. Such behavior may include repeated threats of suicide (even if not credible), repeated threats to others, repeated abusive or violent arguments, or other extreme behavior requiring repeated interventions by Resident Assistants, Student Life Coordinators, or the Dean of Students or his or her staff. Notice of this suspension and the reasons for it must be provided to the student in writing. The Dean shall report the suspension promptly to faculty members teaching courses or tutorials for which the student is registered and to the next regular Faculty Meeting.

Appeal – A student suspended for the reasons above may appeal the suspension in writing to the Dean of Students within five (5) calendar days from the date of suspension. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of suspension; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Dean of Students; or, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct. The Dean will then convene an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Students, the Director of Health Services, and the student’s advisor or another faculty member of the student’s choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, including eligibility for suspension. The ad hoc committee will report to next faculty meeting, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee on the student’s appeal. If the ad hoc committee is recommending against the suspension, the student shall be reinstated pending action by the full Faculty.

 Recommendation from the Sexual Harassment Panel

As stated in the Marlboro College Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct, if the Sexual Harassment Panel finds that the Respondent’s actions constituted sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or retaliation, it will promptly notify the Complainant to give the Complainant an opportunity to present a “victim impact statement” to assist in determining the appropriate sanction. Evidence that the Respondent has previous complaints against him or her that have been heard through the Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct process may here be introduced. The Panel may consult with the Dean of Students to insure that the details of the execution of its sentence are both clear and practical. The Panel will forward its findings and recommendation (which may include suspension or expulsion) for action to the Respondent and to the Dean of Students who will affirm or modify the proposed sanction. When the Dean of Students determines the appropriate sanction, he or she shall notify the Respondent and the Compliance Coordinator within three (3) calendar days of receiving the Panel’s findings and recommendation for action.

Appeal - The Respondent may appeal the findings of the Panel and sanction to the Dean’s Advisory Committee within five (5) calendar days from the date of the Dean’s decision. Appeals must be submitted in writing, detailing the specific reason(s) for the appeal. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the formal investigation or hearing on the matter; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Investigator or the Panel; or, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct violating the Policy. The Dean’s Advisory Committee considering the appeal shall not conduct a new fact investigation but may consult with members of the Panel and shall have the authority to affirm, reverse or modify the decision and/or the penalty imposed, or to remand the matter to the college official imposing the sanction for further consideration. The decision on the appeal is the final appeal available internally to the college. Appeal determinations will generally occur within five (5) days from the receipt of the appeal.

 Community Court

As established in the Marlboro College Constitution & Bylaws, if Community Court finds the student charged guilty, it may impose penalties including suspension and expulsion. For major offenses, the Court may expel for the first offense. Penalties imposed by the Court are final and effective immediately. Any defendant who believes that due process has been violated or that the penalty imposed is disproportionate in light of prior cases may request that the President review the procedures followed by the Court in reaching its verdict and sentence. This request must be made in writing within five (5) working days from the date of the Court’s decision. Should the President find that due process has been violated or that the penalty seems disproportionate, he or she shall instruct the Court to reconsider the case in light of those findings. The Court may correct any process error and either reach a new verdict, impose a different penalty, or reaffirm its earlier decision, with additional explanation. On appeal, no suspension or expulsion may be imposed until the President and the Court agree. A decided case may be appealed directly to the Court, after consultation with the Advocate, where relevant new evidence arises, provided that such new evidence was clearly unavailable through reasonable investigation at the time of the original hearing. In the event that the sentence proposed will require the supervision of the Dean of Students (as, for instance, in all cases of suspension, expulsion, or restriction off campus), the Court shall confer with the Dean of Students before announcing the sentence, to insure that the details of the execution of its sentence are both clear and practical. The person charged is not normally present for such consultation, but may be allowed to be present at the discretion of the Court.

Tenure

Tenured members of the faculty are those who have been specifically designated as such by the President, after a vote by the Board of Trustees. This vote follows a recommendation by the Committee on Faculty regarding the faculty member’s appointment. Tenured members are appointed for an indefinite term. For all tenure appointments, the criteria are the same as for term appointments, with the understanding that tenure appointment particularly requires evidence of strength according to the criteria, not merely an absence of shortcomings. Part-time teachers may, in special circumstances, be eligible for tenure. Tenure for part-time teachers may be warranted when the part-time position is well established within the curriculum, the position is at least one-half time, and the part-time teacher maintains an active role in the College community beyond the teaching of classes.

Term Life Insurance

If you are a regular or academic-calendar staff member working at least 30 hours per week, you are also eligible for group term life insurance benefits after 30 days from date of hire. This benefit is paid in full by the College. The policy provides an amount equal to 100% of your annual earnings, rounded to the next higher $1,000, if not already a multiple thereof, plus $10,000 to a maximum of $200,000. It is your responsibility as an employee to be sure that your beneficiary information is current. Special terms and restrictions apply. Please contact the human resources office to enroll in the plan or for more information. For more details, consult the plan documents.

Termination of Appointments

Tenured Faculty

Appointments for an indefinite term may be terminated only by either of the following procedures:

  • By following AAUP guidelines in force at the time for dismissal of tenured members.
  • By notice in writing from the President twenty-one (21) months before the termination is to take effect. A faculty member shall have the right to be heard by an ad hoc elected faculty committee of five (5), three (3) of whom shall have been at the College for at least eight years. If the faculty member elects to exercise this right, the judgment of the committee shall be final.

Criteria

The criteria for recommendations by the Committee on Faculty and decisions by the ad hoc committee shall be: effective teaching, sound scholarship, fulfillment of non-academic obligations to the College and the College community, and a proper regard for colleagues and students.

If the question of burden of proof arises, it shall be placed on the faculty member before the Committee on Faculty; it shall be placed on the administration before the ad hoc committee of five (5).

Non-Tenured Faculty

A non-tenured faculty member on a term appointment may appeal a Committee on Faculty non-renewal recommendation. Within one month of being notified of a non-renewal recommendation by the Committee, the faculty member must request of the Dean of Faculty the right to be heard by an elected faculty committee of five (5), three (3) of whom shall have been at the College for at least eight years and none of whom currently sit on the Committee on Faculty. This committee shall be elected each spring to serve during the following academic year, should the need arise. The purview of this committee is limited to determining whether adequate consideration was given; if adequate consideration was given, the Committee on Faculty recommendation would stand; if not, the Committee on Faculty would have to take new considerations into account but would still make the recommendation.

Terms and Definitions

  1. Consent
  2. Involved People
  3. Prohibited behavior

  A. Consent

Consent is a voluntary agreement to engage in a sexual act, actively given through words and/or actions. It is always the responsibility of the person initiating a specific action to make certain the other person or persons has given effective consent.

Consent is freely given: Consent is an ongoing conversation that necessitates open communication and should be given in the absence of pressure, coercion, or force. Each party must feel able to withdraw consent from any action at any time through words and/or actions.

Consent is informed: Each party must obtain consent through mutually understood comprehension of each act before it happens and continuously throughout the interaction.

Consent is sober and age appropriate: Consent cannot be given by someone who is incapacitated by drugs and/or alcohol; mentally incapacitated in that the person would not be reasonably able to understand the nature of the activity; and/or in circumstances where the person is not able to consent because of their age (see definition of statutory rape below).

Consent is not indefinite or unlimited: A person who has consented to one thing has not consented to all things. Furthermore, consent cannot be inferred from silence, a previous sexual relationship, a current sexual relationship, someone’s state of dress or their acceptance of dinner or an invitation for a date.

  B. Involved People

i. Advisor or Support Person

The Advisor or Support Person’s role is to provide support and advice to the complainant or respondent. The complainant and the respondent have the right to be accompanied at all stages of a proceeding conducted under this Policy and any related meetings by an Advisor or Support Person of their choice. This person can, but need not, be a member of the College Community. The role of the Advisor or Support Person is to advise and support, such as helping a party to prepare their statements and providing general support, or advising a party privately during a meeting or hearing, but not to advocate or speak for a party or address an investigator or decision-maker directly. The advisor or support person should not be a witness in the case. Any conflicts of interest will be reviewed by the Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator will attempt to assist parties in identifying an appropriate Advisor or Support Person.

ii. Complainant

A complainant may be any member of the Marlboro College Community or covered third party who may have been subjected to conduct that violates this Policy. For purposes of this Policy, a complainant is usually a student, employee, or third party involved in some way in an academic, athletic, extracurricular or residential program of the College (“covered third party”). The College Community shall include students, faculty, staff, and their respective spouses, kitchen staff regularly assigned to Marlboro College, and trustees when participating in College-related activities.

In some cases (such as, for example, cases in which a student, employee, or covered third party involved in an alleged incident of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking does not wish to participate in the process but the College decides that the alleged misconduct needs to be investigated and addressed), the College may move forward with an investigation and/or related disciplinary proceedings without a designated complainant. In such cases, the College may extend the full rights of a complainant as defined in this Policy to affected parties as deemed appropriate by the College. For ease of reference and consistency, the term “complainant” is used hereafter in this Policy to refer to a person who believes that they have been subjected to sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, or who is believed by another to have been subjected to such conduct, even if that person does not wish to participate personally in a disciplinary proceeding or investigation.

iii. Responsible Employee

A “responsible employee” is a College employee who has the authority to address sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, stalking, and retaliation, who has a duty to report related incidents to the Title IX Coordinator or other College officials, or who a student could reasonably believe has this authority or duty. At Marlboro College, all faculty and staff members, including Resident Advisors are considered Responsible Employees. Responsible employees are respectful of a complainant’s wishes to the extent appropriate and are discreet, but they are not able to guarantee confidentiality. General inquiries or questions about this Policy may remain private, and the College will strive to protect the privacy of individuals to the extent it can while maintaining its obligations to uphold relevant policies and regulations and/or to take reasonable steps to promote the safety of members of the College community. Otherwise, responsible employees will report relevant details (such as the name of the complainant and respondent, any witnesses, and other relevant facts, such as the date, time and specific location of the alleged incident) to the Title IX Coordinator or other College officials

If a complainant discloses an incident to a responsible employee but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the College must weigh that request against the College’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, faculty and staff. Responsible Employees are not confidential resources and cannot guarantee confidentiality to a reporting individual. The Title IX Coordinator will in most cases determine whether the College needs to perform an investigation and/or take some other action in cases where a complainant would prefer complete confidentiality. If for some reason the Title IX Coordinator is not able or is not the appropriate person to make such a determination, the determination will be made by an individual designated by the President.

If an individual who makes a report insists that their name or other identifiable information not be revealed and the College is able to respect that request, the individual must understand that the College will be unable to conduct an investigation into the particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against the respondent.

The College will protect the confidentiality of individuals allegedly subjected to sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating or domestic violence and/or stalking to the extent practicable in light of the need to do investigations and conduct disciplinary proceedings.

iv. Respondent

A respondent is any member of the Marlboro College Community who is reported to have engaged in conduct in violation of this Policy. The College Community shall include students, faculty, staff, and their respective spouses, kitchen staff regularly assigned to Marlboro College, and trustees when present.

v. Panel on Sexual Misconduct, Dating and Domestic Violence, Stalking and Retaliation

The Panel on Sexual Misconduct, Dating/Domestic Violence and Stalking (“Panel”) shall be composed of a pool of at least two faculty, two staff members, two graduate school personnel and two undergraduate students. The President or their designee may appoint additional Panel members to serve as substitutes or replacements. Each case shall be reviewed and determined by a Panel consisting of no fewer than three members. In cases handled through the formal complaint process described below, the Panel considers investigation reports and evidence collected in investigations, and deliberates and makes decisions on whether or not this Policy has been violated and recommendations about sanctions, as described below.

The staff and faculty members shall be appointed by the President or designee in consultation with the standing Panel, for an indefinite term. The President will consider gender diversity in making appointments. The two student Panel members shall be elected by Town Meeting for a one-year term. A student who is a complainant or a respondent may request that no students sit on the Panel. In such an instance, the Panel will be composed of the remaining staff and faculty members. With the assistance of the Survivor Advocate and the Dean of Students, the Title IX Coordinator will coordinate a comprehensive training and organization at the start of the academic year for the Panel. This training may include, but is not limited to, an in-depth review of this Policy, general information about sexual misconduct and a discussion and practice deliberation regarding a hypothetical case. The Title IX Coordinator may solicit a volunteer clerk for each Panel that hears a case.

More information about Panel-related procedures is provided in the Procedures section below.

vi. Survivor Advocate

The Survivor Advocate[2] is a member of the staff whose responsibilities include providing first-responder support to those who may have been subject to a violation of the policy, which includes providing and referring to resources on and off campus, and advocating for, and/or advising complainants during institutional disciplinary processes. The Survivor Advocate will assist the Title IX Coordinator and the Dean of Students in educating and training staff, faculty, and students on issues of sexual misconduct and the policy overall. The Survivor Advocate may also be involved in staff and faculty training, and campus education on issues pertaining to sexual misconduct and the response of the College to reports of possible violations of the Policy and criminal acts.

  C. Prohibited Behavior

The definitions of sexual assault, domestic and dating violence and stalking used in this policy are consistent with the Clery Act, as amended effective 2014. In its primary prevention and awareness programs for incoming students and new employees, and its ongoing prevention and awareness programs for students and employees, the College includes the definitions of sexual assault, the definition of consent in reference to sexual activity, and the definitions of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking that are used by Vermont criminal laws. However, the College utilizes its own definitions of these prohibited behaviors for purposes of this policy that are consistent with the Clery Act, as amended effective 2014, and determines responsibility for violations of College policy through its own procedures and standards of proof (that is, by a preponderance of the evidence standard), not through the procedures or standards of proof employed in the criminal justice system.

i. Sexual Misconduct

The College prohibits a broad range of inappropriate sexualized activity through this Policy, including sexual misconduct and sexual exploitation. The prohibitions of this Policy apply regardless of the sex, sexual orientation or gender identity of any involved individual. “Sexual misconduct” is a sexual act that takes place without effective consent of all parties involved, as defined in this policy. Sexual misconduct may include sexual assault, or sexual exploitation or both.

Students or employees may be prosecuted under Vermont criminal statutes, and subject to disciplinary action by the College. The College may choose to pursue disciplinary action while a criminal action is pending or even if criminal justice authorities choose not to prosecute.

As a matter of Marlboro College policy, the College strictly prohibits conduct that would constitute sexual misconduct under College policy as defined here. The College encourages complainants who believe they are being or have been subjected to such conduct, and others with knowledge of such conduct, to report the conduct to the College through the procedures described below, and to seek the support of the College and/or external resources identified in this Policy.

a. Sexual assault may be either rape, fondling without consent, non-consensual sexual contact, incest, or statutory rape as defined in the Clery Act and below. Rape or sexual assault is non-consensual contact between persons, consisting of contact between the penis and the vulva, penis and the anus, the mouth and the penis, the mouth and the vulva or any intrusion however slight, by any part of a person’s body or any object into the genital or anal opening of another. Incest as defined in the Clery Act as “sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.” In Vermont, no person is permitted to marry their parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, sibling, sibling’s child, or parent’s sibling. “Statutory rape” is defined in the Clery Act as “[s]exual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.” In Vermont, this means sexual contact with a person who is under the age of 16, unless such person is at least 15 years old and the other person is less than 19 years old, and the sexual contact was consensual. All of these forms of behavior are prohibited by this Policy.

b. Fondling is the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent (as defined in this Policy) of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.

c. Non-consensual sexual contact is any intentional touching of a person’s breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, or other intimate parts without consent. Touching may be over or under clothing and may include the respondent touching the complainant, the respondent making the complainant touch the respondent or another person, or the respondent making the complainant touch the complainant’s own body.

d. Sexual misconduct also includes sexual exploitation and voyeurism. “Sexual exploitation” or “voyeurism” occurs when a person takes sexual advantage of another person for the benefit of anyone other than that person without that person’s consent. Examples of behavior that could rise to the level of sexual exploitation include but are not limited to: prostituting another person; recording images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness without that person’s consent; distributing images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness, if the individual distributing the images or audio knows or should have known that the person depicted in the images or audio did not consent to such disclosure and objects to such disclosure; and, viewing another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness in a place where that person would have a reasonable expectation of privacy, without that person’s consent, and for the purpose of arousing or gratifying sexual desire. Sexual exploitation may occur regardless of whether sexual activity takes place.

ii. Dating and Domestic Violence

  • Dating Violence is threats or actual sexual or physical abuse in a dating relationship.
  • Domestic Violence is a crime of violence committed by former spouse, cohabiting partner, or someone with whom you share a child.

As a matter of Marlboro College policy, the College strictly prohibits conduct that would constitute dating and domestic violence as defined above. The College encourages complainants who believe they are being or have been subjected to such conduct, and others with knowledge of such conduct, to report the conduct to the College through the procedures described in this Policy, and to seek the support of the College and/or external resources identified in this Policy.

iii. Stalking

“Stalking” is defined as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that the person engaging in the conduct knows or should know would cause a reasonable person to:

  1. Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
  2. Suffer substantial emotional distress.

For the purposes of this definition:

  • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the alleged stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
  • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the person subjected to the stalking.
  • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

When part of a pattern of behavior that falls within the definition of stalking described above, examples of stalking behaviors or activities may include, but are not limited to:

  • Non-consensual communication, including face-to-face communication, telephone calls, voice messages, emails, text messages, written letters, gifts, or any other communications that are unwelcome.
  • Use of online, electronic, or digital technologies in connection with such communication, including but not limited to:
    • Posting of pictures or text in chat rooms or on websites;
    • Sending unwanted/unsolicited e-mail or talk requests;
    • Posting private or public messages on Internet sites, social networks, and/or school bulletin boards
    • Installing spyware on a person’s computer;
    • Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) or similar technology to monitor a person.
  • Pursuing, following, waiting, or showing up uninvited at or near a residence, workplace, classroom, or other places frequented by the person.
  • Surveillance or other types of observation including staring or “peeping”
  • Trespassing
  • Vandalism
  • Non-consensual touching
  • Direct verbal or physical threats
  • Gathering information about an individual from friends, family, or co-workers
  • Accessing private information through unauthorized means
  • Threats to harm self or others
  • Using a third party or parties to accomplish any of the above.

As a matter of Marlboro College policy, the College strictly prohibits conduct that would constitute stalking as defined above. The College encourages individuals who believe that they are being or have been subjected to such conduct, and others with knowledge of such conduct, to report the conduct to the College through the procedures described below, and to seek the support of the College and/or external resources identified in this Policy.

iv. Sexual Harassment

It is a violation of this Policy of Marlboro College, and illegal under state and federal law, for any student, faculty, or staff to harass another student, faculty, staff, or visitor because of sex. Marlboro College is committed to providing a workplace and educational environment that is free from this unlawful conduct. Harassment need not be intentional; the effect and characteristics of the conduct determine whether the behavior constitutes sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination and means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

  1. submission to that conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or academic standing;
  2. submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a component of the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting that individual; or
  3. the conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment.

Examples of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to the following, when such acts or behavior come within one of the above definitions:

  • either explicitly or implicitly conditioning any term of employment (e.g., continued employment, wages, evaluation, advancement, assigned duties or shifts) or academic standing (e.g., admission, grades/evaluation, accessibility to classes/tutorials or plan work) on the provision of sexual favors;
  • touching or grabbing any part of an individual’s body after that person has indicated, or it is known, that such physical conduct is unwelcome (conduct of this sort that may constitute fondling as defined above will primarily be investigated and addressed as fondling, but may be investigated and addressed as sexual harassment as well, as deemed appropriate by the College);
  • continuing to ask an individual to socialize on or off duty when that individual has indicated they are not interested, including one who has been previously involved in a consensual relationship;
  • displaying or transmitting sexually suggestive pictures, objects, cartoons or posters if it is known or should be known that the behavior is unwelcome;
  • continuing to write sexually suggestive notes or letters if it is known or should be known that the individual does not welcome such behavior;
  • referring to or calling an individual sexualized names if it is known or should be known that the person does not welcome such behavior;
  • regularly telling sexual jokes or using sexually vulgar or explicit language in the presence of an individual if it is known or should be known that the individual does not welcome such behavior;
  • making derogatory or provoking remarks about or relating to an individual’s sex or sexual orientation;
  • engaging in harassing acts or behavior directed against an individual on the basis of one’s perceived sex or sexual orientation;
  • creating a hostile environment by pursuing harassing acts or behavior directed against a third person or persons;
  • engaging in off-duty conduct which falls within the above definition and affects the work or academic environment.

It is helpful to an investigation if the employee, student, or faculty member keeps notes regarding events and the names of people that witnessed or were told of the harassment.

As a matter of Marlboro College policy, the College strictly prohibits conduct that would constitute sexual harassment as defined above. The College encourages complainants who believe they are being or have been subjected to such conduct, and others with knowledge of such conduct, to report the conduct to the College through the procedures described below, and to seek the support of the College and/or external resources identified in this Policy.

v. Retaliation

Retaliation against an individual for reporting, in good faith, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic/dating violence stalking, or sexual harassment, or for cooperating in the investigation or resolution of a complaint of such misconduct is prohibited by this Policy. Retaliation includes, but is not limited to, materially adverse acts that affect the educational or work environment of any individual involved in the complaint or the investigation such as, intimidation, reprisal, ostracism, action altering the person’s duties or assignments, work or academic environment because the individual reported the misconduct or cooperated in or supported a complaint or investigation or resolution of such misconduct. Any person who believes that they are subject to retaliation should follow the complaint resolution procedure.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA)

Marlboro College is required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) to inform its students, at least annually, of their rights under this Act. They are:

  1. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement and health staff); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Other exceptions include disclosures such as date of birth to authorized representatives of Federal-and State-supported programs, e.g., the Comptroller General of the United States; the Secretary of State educational authorities; the Veterans Administration; the Secretary of Defense.
  2. The right to inspect and review education records within 45 days of a date the written request is received. Students should submit a written request identifying the record(s) they wish to inspect to the appropriate college official who will arrange for such access.
    The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask that the college amend a record they believe is inaccurate or misleading by writing to the college official responsible for the record, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specifying why it is inaccurate or misleading. The college will notify students of the decision to amend or not and advise them of their rights to a hearing regarding their request.
  3. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged non- compliance by the institution to the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605.

The Progression

Preamble

Overview

The Sophomore Portfolio

The Sophomore Review

The Sophomore Progression Meeting

The Preliminary Plan Application

  Preamble

The Sophomore Progression will go into full effect in the Fall of 2017, and will apply to new students admitted on or after Fall 2016. Students who complete their Sophomore year prior to Fall 2017 will be invited, at their own discretion and that of their advisors, to engage in the process described below: to create a Sophomore Portfolio and engage in a Progression Meeting. Until Fall 2017, students and their advisors may still choose to engage in Sophomore Review process as practiced prior to the institution of the policy described below.

  Overview

All students, in the second semester of their Sophomore year, must engage in the Progression in preparation for their transition to the Plan of Concentration. (Transfer students in their Junior year will have until the end of their first semester at Marlboro to finish the Progression.) The Progression will comprise three elements:

  • All students will compile a Sophomore Portfolio (see below) comprising various examples of the student’s academic work and community engagement in the first two years;
  • All students will write a Sophomore Review (see below), assessing the progress they have made in the First and Sophomore years and projecting toward the work they hope to do in the Junior and Senior Years;
  • The Progression will culminate in a Progression Meeting with the student, their current advisor, and a potential Plan Sponsor (or other faculty member teaching in an area of the student’s Plan interest). All students will conclude the Progression having completed, with their Plan Sponsor(s), a Preliminary Plan Application.

For Junior Transfers: Students who transfer to Marlboro as Juniors, and who plan on graduating within four semesters of their admission date, may engage in an expedited process of Sophomore Progression. In consultation with their advisors and teachers, such students should put together a Transfer Portfolio comprised of their work at Marlboro and their prior institution(s). The student’s advisor will be responsible for helping the student to create the Portfolio. It is understood that Transfer Portfolios may contain less material than some Sophomore Portfolios. It will be left to the discretion of the advisor and the potential Plan sponsor(s), within the general guidelines set out below, to determine on a case-by-case basis what a Transfer Portfolio should contain. Junior Transfers should present their Transfer Portfolio and go through the Progression process during their first full semester at Marlboro.

  The Sophomore Portfolio

During their first two years at Marlboro students will compile a portfolio representative of their academic and community life at the college. The portfolio is an opportunity for students to build habits of critical reflection on their learning as well as their engagement in the local and larger community.

The portfolio should include, but is not limited to:

A transcript.

  1. A collection of reflections on the student’s learning and growth in the first two years. This collection should include reflections on growth in particular courses and/or summations of significant experiences, academic or otherwise, in a given semester. Students should work with faculty and academic advisors to develop these reflections throughout their first two years.
  2. Examples, drawn from both the classroom and participation in the wider community, of the student’s growth and engagement. These might include papers or projects produced for classes, articles written for The Citizen or other publication, photos or other artwork, recordings or reflections on performances, or records of significant engagement in or beyond the Marlboro community. In compiling these examples, students and their advisors should take as guidelines the categories that frame the Sophomore Review (see below), as well as the College’s Mission Statement and the Statement of Educational Ideals.
  3. A Resume.

In order to support the development of the Sophomore Portfolio, advisors will guide the process during Dedicated Hour and faculty will recommend to students work that they think should be included in the portfolio. Also, the Director of the Career and Life Path Center, the Assistant Dean of Academic Advising and Support, and the Student Life staff will be available to help students produce portfolios.

  The Sophomore Review

Students at Marlboro are expected during the first two years to study broadly across the curriculum and, in so doing, to develop their interests and areas of focus; they should establish skills and background for the advanced and specialized work a Plan of Concentration will require. Throughout the first two years, students and their advisors will record and reflect on this process in compiling the Sophomore Portfolio (see above). During the second semester of the Sophomore year, students will work with their academic advisors to reflect broadly on the work in the Portfolio and assess their progress, in the form of a written Sophomore Review.

The goals of the Sophomore Review are:

  • To engage in a discussion of the structure and goals of the student’s education at its midpoint.
  • To assess the character and quality of the student’s education during the first two years.
  • To support the values of broad study, international perspective, and good writing.
  • To anticipate the needs of the Plan of Concentration.

With the help of their advisor, students will write their Sophomore Review no later than midterm of their Sophomore 2 semester, in preparation for their Sophomore Progression meeting. The review should reflect on four broad areas, with respect to the student’s education so far, the materials included in the Sophomore Portfolio and the work they wish to do in the next two years:

  • Breadth of study: How have you studied across the areas of the curriculum (Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences)? Have you taken courses that involve different kinds of learning that develop different kinds of skills? For instance, have you taken any courses that involve Quantitative Reasoning?
  • Developing a global perspective: How have you studied a culture outside your own or a foreign language? Have you traveled, or have you worked with people from other cultures?
  • Writing: How have you continued to strengthen your writing since meeting the Writing Requirement? Is your writing ready for the level of written work you propose on Plan?
  • Participating in Community: How have you engaged in work that reflects responsible action in the community? This might include anything from Town Meeting or Faculty Committee service, orientation or admissions work, to a wide range of other community-minded activities. How has the work integrated itself with your academic choices?

  The Sophomore Progression Meeting

At some point during the second semester of the Sophomore year, students and their advisors must schedule a Progression Meeting. The Meeting may be scheduled at any time, at the discretion of the student and the participating reviewers. But the following times will be set aside in the schedule for Progression Meetings:

One Wednesday afternoon in each Fall semester;

  • Two Wednesday afternoons in each Spring semester;
  • The Friday Reading Day at the ned of both the Fall and Spring semesters.

Early in the Sophomore 2 semester, the student, in consultation with their academic advisor, should finish compiling the materials for the Sophomore Portfolio and write a Sophomore Review (see above). The advisor will then schedule a Progression Meeting to include

The student;

  • The advisor;
  • A potential Plan sponsor. (In the event a particular Plan sponsor is unavailable, any member of the faculty may sit in, at the discretion of the student and the advisor. In such cases it is preferable that the alternate faculty member be chosen from the same academic area as the Plan Sponsor.)

To prepare for the Progression Meeting, the reviewing faculty members will consider the Sophomore Review and the Sophomore Portfolio. The committee will discuss with the student their progress thus far both in terms of academics and community engagement. Committee members will discuss the student’s goals for the Junior and Senior years, and together with the student will devise a plan to help the student fill in curricular gaps in the Junior year and prepare for a Plan in their area(s) of focus. The committee will then help the student complete the Preliminary Plan Application (see below), to be signed by the committee members before being forwarded to the Dean of Faculty for review.

  The Preliminary Plan Application

At their Progression Meeting (see below), students will complete their Preliminary Plan Application. This Application serves as the student’s formal entry onto the first year of the Plan.

The Preliminary Plan Application is available online. Students should fill out the Preliminary Plan Application with their advisor(s) before their Sophomore Progression Meeting, and then present it for review, amendment and approval at the meeting. (Students whose potential Plan Sponsor cannot attend the Progression Meeting can obtain the approval prior to the meeting, but the form should also be approved by the attending faculty members at the Progression Meeting as well.)

After the Progression Meeting, the Preliminary Plan Application will be forwarded to the registrar, who will forward it to the Curriculum Committee for approval, then to the Dean of Faculty, who will circulate a copy to the Faculty for review before final approval.

The deadline for completing the Progression is the preregistration deadline. Students will not be able to preregister until they have completed the Progression.

Title IX Coordinator and coordination

Title IX Coordinator and coordination

Functions and Responsibilities of the Title IX Coordinator

The Title IX Coordinator’s Committee on Policy and Procedure

  Title IX Coordinator and coordination

Pursuant to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the U.S. Department of Education’s implementing regulations at 34 C.F.R. Part 106, the College’s Title IX Coordinator has primary responsibility for coordinating the College’s efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under Title IX, which prohibits sex discrimination in all the operations of the College, as well as retaliation for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by Title IX.

Sexual misconduct against students and employees, including sexual harassment, sexual assault, rape, and sexual exploitation, can be a form of sex discrimination under Title IX. The Title IX Coordinator oversees the College’s response to reports and complaints that involve possible sex discrimination to monitor outcomes, identify and address any patterns, and assess effects on the campus climate, so the College can address issues that affect the wider school community. The College’s Title IX Coordinator also oversees, in collaboration with other College offices as necessary, the College’s response to reports and complaints of dating violence, domestic violence and stalking involving College students and employees.

The Title IX Coordinator is appointed by the President or their designee. The Title IX Coordinator is available to meet with students, employees or third parties regarding Title IX-related issues, such as issues related to the College’s compliance with Title IX, response to Title IX reports or complaints, related grievance procedures, relevant patterns of conduct, or related education and prevention programs. The contact information for the Marlboro College Title IX Coordinator is:

Jean Kiewel
Email: jkiewel@marlboro.edu
Pager: 802-742-4705

To accomplish the duties, subject to the exemption for confidential employees discussed below, the Title IX Coordinator must be informed of all reports and complaints raising Title IX issues, even if the report or complaint was initially filed with another individual or office or if the investigation will be conducted by another individual or office. All responsible employees (any faculty or staff members at Marlboro College including RAs) must promptly report to the Title IX Coordinator any complaint or suspected and/or alleged acts of sexual misconduct.

Any Marlboro College Community Member involved with issues covered by this policy may file a complaint with the College’s Title IX Coordinator concerning how a procedure was followed, violation of complainant or respondent legal rights, apparent conflicts of interest by Panel members, or other violation of policy or related concern that was not reviewed in an appeal process. Records of these complaints will be reviewed by the President and by the Chair of the Board of Trustees and the person making the complaint will be notified of any action taken in response. The College’s Title IX Compliance Committee (described below) will also review such complaints at least annually to assist the Title IX Coordinator and the College to identify, for example, whether policies, practices or procedures need to be changed in order to improve the College’s response to complaints of issues covered by this policy.

A student or employee should contact the Title IX Coordinator in order to:

  • seek information or training about students’ or employees’ rights and courses of action available to resolve reports or complaints that involve potential sex discrimination, including sexual misconduct,
  • file a complaint or make a report of sex discrimination, including sexual misconduct,
  • notify the College of an incident or policy or procedure that may raise potential Title IX concerns,
  • get information about available resources (including confidential resources) and support services relating to sex discrimination, including sexual misconduct,
  • ask questions about the College’s policies and procedures related to sex discrimination, including sexual misconduct, and
  • seek or provide information about any of these issues as they relate to dating violence, domestic violence or stalking involving College students or employees.

In the event that the incident, policy, or procedure about which the student or employee seeks to file a report or complaint creates the appearance of a conflict of interest with the Title IX Coordinator, students or employees may contact the President’s Office. The President or designee will appoint another person to handle the College’s related responsibilities, as appropriate. Also, the President or the Title IX Coordinator may designate another person, where necessary, to carry out some or all of the Title IX Coordinator’s duties where necessary in particular cases and/or at particular times. The Title IX Compliance Committee will also review and consider such reports and complaints at least annually, to facilitate its work and the College’s response to complaints covered by this policy, as described in more detail below.

Inquiries or complaints that involve potential violations of Title IX may also be referred to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, which can be reached at: https://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/cfapps/OCR/contactus.cfm or the Educational Opportunities Section of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ): http://www.justice.gov/crt/complaint/#three.

A. Functions and Responsibilities of the Title IX Coordinator

The Title IX Coordinator’s functions and responsibilities include the following:

Training for Students, Faculty, and Staff

The Title IX Coordinator provides or facilitates ongoing training, consultation, and technical assistance on Title IX for all students, faculty and staff, including regular training for faculty and staff outlining their rights and obligations under Title IX, the appropriate response to reports of sexual misconduct, the obligation to report sexual misconduct to appropriate College officials, and the extent to which counselors and advocates may keep a report confidential, and regular training for students outlining their rights under Title IX. With regard to sexual misconduct, this training will include what constitutes sexual misconduct and when it creates a hostile environment, the definition of consent, reporting options (including reports to responsible employees, and confidential reporting to counselors or advocates), the grievance procedures used to process complaints, applicable disciplinary code provisions relating to sexual misconduct and the consequences of violating those provisions, the role of alcohol and drugs in sexual misconduct, the effects of trauma, strategies and skills for bystander intervention, the offices or individuals with whom students can speak confidentially, the offices or individuals who can provide support services, the employees who must report incidents to the Title IX Coordinator, and Title IX’s protections against retaliation.

Investigations

The College will conduct adequate, reliable, and impartial investigations of reports and complaints of sexual misconduct. The Title IX Coordinator oversees many aspects of this response, including:

  • determining whether the report or complaint alleges conduct that may, upon investigation, constitute prohibited sexual misconduct,
  • appointing an investigator or investigators upon such determination,
  • making certain that individual reports and complaints are handled properly and in a prompt and timely manner,
  • informing all parties regarding the complaint process,
  • confirming that all parties have been notified of decisions and of the right to, and procedures for, appeal,
  • maintaining information and documentation related to the investigation in a secure manner, and
  • monitoring compliance with timeframes specified in the complaint procedures.

The Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with other appropriate individuals as appropriate, evaluates requests for confidentiality by those who report or complain about sexual misconduct in the context of the College’s responsibility to provide a safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all students and employees.

  B. The Title IX Coordinator’s Committee on Policy and Procedure

The Title IX Coordinator’s Committee on Policy and Procedure will work with the Title IX Coordinator to identify and assess concerns or complaints about the College’s procedures and practices related to misconduct prohibited by this Policy. The Committee will also assist the Title IX Coordinator on intersecting concerns or issues around Community Conduct procedures or Community Court. The Committee will consist of two students, two faculty and two staff, who will be appointed to the Committee for one-year terms by the Dean of Students and Title IX Coordinator in consultation with Selectboard. The Committee will meet at the Title IX Coordinator’s request, on an “as needed basis.” In such circumstances where the Committee needs to meet and the Title IX Coordinator cannot attend, a proxy designated by the Title IX Coordinator will attend instead. The overall purpose of this Committee is to assist and support the efforts of the Title IX Coordinator and their team in their efforts to prevent and respond to sexual misconduct on Marlboro College’s campus.

Transfer Credit

General Statement

The Policy

Credit for Examinations

Foreign Institutions

  General Statement

Marlboro College considers transferring credits for academic liberal arts courses taken at a college or university accredited by an organization that is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) or the U.S. Department of Education. In order for courses to transfer, the grade must be a C- or better, and the course(s) must be comparable in content, nature and intensity to course(s) offered at Marlboro College. Grades are not transferable.

We also consider transfer credit for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations (see below for a list). Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration.

All transfer credit is provisional. The provisional credits are fully granted once the student completes one semester of coursework as a degree student at Marlboro College. Students should consult with the Registrar for more information on the logistics of processing transfer credits.

  The Policy

Only courses in which a student has earned a grade of C- or better may be considered for transfer. Courses graded P (Pass) will not be considered unless the student can provide certification from the institution issuing the record that a grade of P is equivalent to a letter grade of C- or better.

Students submit official transcripts of coursework completed at regionally-accredited degree-granting institutions to the Registrar’s office or in some cases the Admissions Office (only if new applicants or newly admitted, not yet enrolled). For incoming students, transcripts must be received by the Registrar’s office by the first day of classes of the term in which they enroll. Current Marlboro students who wish to transfer in credits from absentia or leave from Marlboro College must request an official transcript be sent to Marlboro College’s Registrar’s office. The Registrar’s office must receive the transcript prior to the end of final exam period of the term in which the student has returned to Marlboro. Credits are not removed once they are added to an academic record. Students may request, in writing to the Registrar’s office, that a course not be transferred to Marlboro; however, the Registrar’s office must receive such a request before receiving the official transcript.

Marlboro College does not award credit for nonacademic experiential learning prior to coming to Marlboro. Consequently, such credit awarded by other institutions will not be considered for transfer if it is based on experiential learning. Students on Plan, however, may arrange for experiential credit to be applied to their Plan of Concentration.

Courses usually not recognized include physical education, education courses for teacher certification, and other technical or vocational courses, such as engineering, business, computer applications, management, and marketing. Many communications courses will not transfer, including journalism and effective speaking courses. Remedial-level courses, such as writing tutorial, math skills, reading improvement or study skills courses are not accepted for transfer credit. Marlboro College generally does not award transfer credit for First-Year Seminars unless the course description/syllabus demonstrates rigorous academic work comparable to work offered at Marlboro College; in cases where these credits are accepted, a maximum of two credits are allowed to transfer. Transfer students who have earned an R.N. from an accredited nursing school with a three-year program will be granted 30 credits, or one year’s work, toward the Marlboro College degree.

Students who have taken college-level courses through an accredited degree-granting college or university while in high school may submit an official college transcript of that course work to the Admissions Office or the Registrar for evaluation. Provided the student received a grade of C- or better, the credits may be applied to the degree at Marlboro even if they also apply towards the high school diploma. Official transcripts must be received by the Registrar’s office by the first day of classes of the term in which the student enrolls.

Credit for courses that were taken 10 or more years ago is generally not granted in transfer if it is required for a student’s Plan of Concentration. Exceptions may be granted at the discretion of the Plan Sponsor and the Dean of Faculty, when the student can demonstrate current knowledge in the subject area. Credit for courses applied as general credit may be accepted regardless of the age of the credit.

Once students have enrolled in a degree program at Marlboro, they may take coursework at other institutions while they are degree-seeking or on leave of absence or in absentia. Students should check with the Registrar about which classes they take elsewhere are likely to transfer credits back to Marlboro.

  Credit for Examinations

Marlboro College may grant up to 24 credits in total for acceptable performance on the following standardized exams. It is the student’s responsibility to have official transcripts of test scores sent to the Registrar’s Office. Such credit will not be awarded on the basis of another institution’s acceptance.

Advanced Placement (AP): Marlboro College grants up to 4 credits per exam for Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) with a score of 4 or 5. No more than 16 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved AP exams. AP credits are generally awarded during the Sophomore 2 semester.

International Baccalaureate (IB): Marlboro College grants up to eight credits for higher level (HL) examinations passed with scores of 5, 6, or 7 from the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program.

Foreign maturity certificate examinations: Marlboro College considers the results of certain international diploma or certificate examinations and grants up to eight credits for United Kingdom “A” Level General Certificate Examinations grades of A or B. Certain other examinations, such as the French Baccalaureat, German Arbitur, and the Federal Swiss Maturity Certificate may also be recognized. To be considered, students must send their official transcripts to the Registrar’s Office.

Students may appeal the decision of which credits will transfer. To do so, they must state their case in writing, to the Registrar’s office, within one month of the Registrar’s notice that the credits have transferred. The Registrar may request additional information from the student, such as copies of the course descriptions or syllabi. The Registrar may consult with Marlboro College faculty and the Dean of Faculty to review appeals. The Registrar shall notify the student of the result of the appeal.

  Foreign Institutions

If the courses/programs were taken at foreign (non-U.S.) institutions the college or university must be approved by the ministry of education in that country. Since foreign institutions have different systems for measuring coursework, students who study abroad must present official documentation to the Registrar’s Office in order for credits to transfer to Marlboro.

All credentials must be evaluated by an official evaluation organization. The student is responsible to assuring that the organization submits its report to Marlboro College. The costs of the evaluation and postage are borne by the student. Exceptions to this policy include official transcripts in English bearing American grading and credit standards (e.g., American colleges and study abroad programs through American colleges) and official transcripts in English using ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) standards. See the Marlboro website for a listing of evaluation agencies. A minimum grade of C- or the equivalent is required in order for a credit equivalency to transfer. Credential evaluations must be received by the end of the next academic term.

Transfer Students

Because all students need to complete at least 45 credits on Plan in order to graduate, and that generally takes three or four semesters, the highest class standing that is awarded, no matter how many transfer credits are accepted, is First-Semester Junior (JR1). Also, all transfer students must earn at Marlboro at least one-quarter of the credits counted toward their graduation.

Junior transfer students, if their previous records permit, normally are encouraged to start a Plan of Concentration as soon as possible after enrollment at the College. However, a junior transfer whose record does not meet the standard Marlboro prerequisites for Plan would normally be expected to spend an extra semester or more at the College.

Tuition Exchange Program

If you are a full-time staff member, you and your dependents may be eligible for tuition assistance at other colleges and universities through the Tuition Exchange program. The Tuition Exchange (TE) is a non-profit association of 590 colleges and universities across the country. It was founded in 1952 with the intent of making careers in higher education more attractive. TE strives to achieve this through a reciprocal scholarship program, which finances college tuition for the children and other family members of staff and faculty employed at participating institutions, including Marlboro College.

Each year, 4,800 awards are provided through TE across the country at full tuition, or at a set rate if an institution’s tuition is higher than the set rate maximum. Remitted tuition exchanges are an extension of tuition waivers at the home institution. All exchanges are accomplished through trading, no money changes hands and no accounting is done for variations in tuition. Eligible students may receive TE for a maximum of eight semesters or four years of undergraduate study.

You and your dependents (including children, adopted children or stepchildren through age 23) can participate in the TE program if you are a full-time staff member who has worked at Marlboro full-time for a minimum of two years. Part-time staff members are not eligible for TE. The student desiring a TE award must first be accepted for admission at the college or university they wish to attend. After the student is accepted, contact Marlboro College’s director of financial aid for TE application information and forms.

Since the TE program assumes a state of balance between the number of outgoing and incoming TE students, it may be necessary in some years to limit the number of outgoing TE awards that are available to dependents of Marlboro College. In cases in which the number of eligible Marlboro College employees seeking to utilize a TE benefit is greater than the awards allotted to the College the TE benefit will be awarded on the basis of institutional seniority (time and years of continuous service) shall receive the benefit, regardless as to their employee classification.

Please see our Tuition Exchange page for more information.

Unpaid Leave/Unpaid Time Off

If you are a non-exempt staff member, all your available vacation and personal time must be used prior to taking a day off without pay (unpaid leave or unpaid time off) except where otherwise required by law. When you wish to schedule unpaid time off you must obtain approval from your supervisor and mark this time as unpaid leave on your timecard. A non-exempt staff member who is absent from work and has no paid time off (vacation, personal or sick) available will not be paid for the day and must mark this time as unpaid leave on their timecard. If unscheduled unpaid leave becomes a reoccurring problem and/or causes a disturbance in the productivity of a department or in the staff member’s work, it may be cause for discipline.

If you are an exempt staff member with no available paid time off (vacation, personal or sick), consult your supervisor to make individual arrangements regarding your schedule and pay if you must take a day off. Generally, exempt staff members are not permitted to take a day off without pay; however, if necessary and if possible, an exempt staff member may be able to make up the time missed within the same pay period. This does not apply to an unpaid leave of absence; see subsection “Leave of Absence (beyond FMLA)”.

Vacation

Taking regular vacations is an important part of work life, providing staff an opportunity to rest, travel, study, or fulfills other personal goals or ambitions. Vacation requires a supervisor’s advance approval. You are strongly encouraged to request vacation time as far in advance as possible. Vacation time may be taken in daily increments of any size, although the College encourages you to take at least one vacation of a full week or more each year and to use available vacation time before reaching the maximum allowed accrual.

The accrual rate increases on your employment anniversary date. New full-time staff members begin to accrue vacation time after two months of regular employment at a rate of one day per month of completed employment to a maximum of ten days during the first year of employment. On the first employment anniversary, for the second year of employment, vacation accrues at a rate of 0.917 days per month or eleven days during the year. On the second employment anniversary (for the third year of employment) and on each anniversary date thereafter, the accrual rate increases by .083 days per month or one day per year until it reaches a maximum level of 1.67 days per month or 20 days per year. The maximum number of vacation days a full-time staff member is allowed to accrue is one times the person’s annual accrual rate (for example, 12 accrued days for a staff member currently accruing 12 days per year). Additional time will accrue after vacation days are used or after the accrual rate increases on an anniversary date. The accrual rates and limits for a full-time staff member are illustrated in the following table. 

 

Year
 
Accrual Rate/Month
Days per year
Maximum Accrual for full-time staff
1 First two months 0    
1 Months 3-12 1.000 10 10
2   0.917 11 11
3   1.000 12 12
4   1.083 13 13
5   1.167 14 14
6   1.250 15 15
7   1.333 16 16
8   1.417 17 17 
9   1.500  18 18 
10   1.583  19 19
11 and more   1.667  20 20 

 

Staff members will retain their years of service for purposes of determining the accrual rate of vacation when they transfer between benefits-eligible positions within the College. Senior staff members accrue vacation consistently at the rate of twenty days per year starting with their first year of employment. Sick time may be used instead of vacation time if a staff becomes ill or injured while on vacation and would be unable to work. Accrued unused vacation time is payable to staff members in good standing upon termination of employment.

Vehicles and Parking

Marlboro College employees are expected to abide by the vehicle and parking policies found in the Community Constitution and Bylaws and summarized here. For the safety of all, it is prohibited to exceed the campus speed limit of 10 mph in any vehicle. Helmets are required when driving a motorcycle or any two-wheeled motorized vehicle. Commuters are to park in the lower theater lot or the lot across from Persons Auditorium. Employees are not to park in the visitors’ lot across from the admissions building. All vehicles must display a College registration sticker. Plant operations will distribute registration stickers for the undergraduate campus upon hire. Graduate School staff must register their cars with the center coordinator to obtain a sticker for the parking lot on Vernon Street. Any exemptions from this policy must be reviewed and approved by the Fire and Safety Committee.

Vision Insurance

A basic vision care program is available after 30 days from date of hire and effective the first of the following month for employee, employee plus one, employee plus children, employee family. The employee pays the full premium at a discounted group rate. Contact human resources for current group rates.

Voluntary Participation in College Events

As an integral part of the Marlboro College community, you are encouraged (but not required) to attend Town Meeting and participate in Town Meeting committees. Staff members should remain mindful of the responsibilities of their positions while they participate in College community life and they should schedule community activities around work responsibilities. Supervisors may require an employee to reduce the amount of time spent on community activities should a supervisor determine that work performance is adversely affected by the level or type of community involvement.

You are also invited to participate in campus activities outside of regular work hours, on a voluntary basis, such as social gatherings, lectures, performances and exhibits. Voluntary participation in College events and activities is not considered time worked. However, if your supervisor requests that you participate in a College event to achieve the goals of your position or department, the activity will be considered time worked and you will be compensated for that time worked, if in a non-exempt position. Staff members who wish to perform volunteer work for the College must consult first with their supervisors. Supervisors may not require employees to volunteer for any College activities.

Wage Deductions

All deductions to your wages are taken in accordance with applicable law and, when required, with your consent. Required deductions include Medicare and Social Security taxes, federal, state and local income taxes, child support and other garnishments if court ordered. Elective deductions, which require your consent, may include money owed to the College (such as bookstore or dining hall charges), contributions for health insurance premiums and Health Savings Account deposits, 403(b) retirement account contributions and donations to Marlboro College.

Weapons

No weapons or ammunition may be brought or kept by students on campus at any time. Such weapons include, but are not limited to, firearms of any kind, air or gas powered guns, cross bows, sling shots, as well as fireworks, explosives, and explosive devices of any type. The administration reserves the right to determine what is and what is not a controlled item under this policy, and to search all College premises for such materials at any time and without warning.

The Plant and Operations staff, in consultation with the Fire and Safety Committee, will establish a clearly marked and advertised Safety Zone.

It shall be unlawful to:

  1. Discharge firearms on college property within the Safety Zone;
  2. Carry or possess loaded or unloaded firearms on college property within the Safety Zone;
  3. Possess explosives or ammunition on college property within the Safety Zone.
  1. Violations of the Statutes of the State of Vermont with respect to firearms, by the students of Marlboro College, may be considered as violations of the Firearms Regulations of Town Meeting.
  2. Disciplinary action for violations of the above regulations may be determined by Community Court.
  3. The President or his/her designee may move to immediately bar any violator of the Firearms Regulations from campus pending a Community Court hearing.
  4. Those community members who wish to have firearms may be referred to the Director of Plant and Operations as to where to store their firearms off-campus.

Whistleblower Policy

Purpose. Marlboro College has a responsibility for the stewardship of College resources and compliance with the laws and regulations to which it is subject. The College has further obligation to investigate allegations of suspected wrongdoing and to correct or curtail improper activities.

The purpose of this policy is to affirm the principle of protected disclosure and enable faculty, staff, students and others of the College community to identify or raise concerns about suspected wrongful conduct without the risk of retaliation. “Protected disclosure” is any communication about actual or suspected wrongful conduct engaged in by a College employee, student, volunteer, agent or contractor that is based on a good-faith and reasonable belief that the conduct both occurred, or is about to occur, and is contrary to law and /or College policy. “Wrongful conduct” is defined as serious violation of College policy; a violation of applicable state and federal laws; or the use of College property, resources, or authority for personal gain or other non-College-related purpose.

Policy. Any individual who has made a protected disclosure of wrongful conduct or has participated in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing involving a protected disclosure shall not be subject to harassment, retaliation, or adverse employment consequences by the College because of that disclosure. Any employee of the College who retaliates against any individual who makes a protected disclosure shall be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. Any student who engages in acts of retaliation shall be subject to judicial action.

Any employee or volunteer who knowingly gives false information of wrongful conduct or a subsequent false report of retaliation will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. Any student who makes false allegations will be subject to the judicial action of Community Court. Allegations that are not substantiated, but made in good faith, are not subject to disciplinary action.

In most cases, faculty members should direct concerns regarding wrongful conduct to the Dean of Faculty. Staff members should share such concerns with their immediate supervisor. Students should refer such concerns to the Dean of Students. If individuals are not comfortable discussing or reporting suspected wrongful conduct with those persons, or they are not satisfied with the responses that they receive from those persons, they may direct their concerns to any member of the Senior Staff or to the President. If individuals perceive no appropriate channel within the administrative structure of the College for reporting suspected wrongful conduct, they may direct their concerns to the chair of the Audit Committee of the Board of Trustees.

Protected disclosures may be made on a confidential basis or may be submitted anonymously. Confidentiality of the reporter will be maintained to the extent practicable within the limitations of the law, College policy and the legitimate needs of an investigation. Employees should not discuss allegations of wrongful conduct outside of the reporting and investigative process. If reporters self-disclose their identities directly or indirectly through their own actions outside the official investigation process, the College cannot maintain their confidentiality.

Representatives of the College who receive reports of suspected wrongful conduct will acknowledge receipt of those to the disclosing individual (if that person’s identity is known) within ten working days for most issues and within 24 hours for alleged criminal violations. Investigations of alleged wrongful acts will be coordinated by the Chief Planning and Budget Officer, or by the President or presidential designee. All reports will be promptly investigated within 45 calendar days and appropriate corrective action will be taken if warranted by the investigation.

Work Day, Work Week

For most staff members, one working day equals seven and a half hours, and one week equals five working days, for a total of 37.5 hours. For payroll purposes, the Marlboro College work week is defined as the period beginning at 12:00 AM on Saturday and ending at 11:59 PM on the following Friday.

Work Load

While it is obviously impossible to define an appropriate work load for faculty in simple and definitive terms, given the very substantial differences between, for example, teaching a new course on previously unfamiliar material and teaching a familiar course for the third time, the following general guidelines may be helpful. Full-time faculty members should expect to teach at least two courses and four to six tutorials with Plan students, or the equivalent, and to serve on one or two committees. Most long-term faculty routinely carry a greater load than this, reflecting their more settled course offerings and their experience with a broad range of tutorials. No one should expect to teach more than three courses and four to six tutorials, or the equivalent, with committee work. All faculty are encouraged to regulate their work loads to efficient levels. Unanticipated overloads sometimes occur, and faculty members are free to discuss with the Dean possible relief from committee responsibilities or a compensatory lighter load in a succeeding term.

Faculty are expected to schedule classes primarily for the greatest efficiency and curricular coherence but are nonetheless free to establish their schedules and office hours as best suits their preferences. Many faculty find it necessary or desirable to schedule at least part of a day for uninterrupted work at home.

World Studies Program

Admission to the World Studies Program

Curriculum Overview

International Expertise

The Internship Process

Assessing Readiness for Internship 

WSP Plan of Concentration

Language Requirement

 Admission to the World Studies Program

Students gain admission to the World Studies Program by submitting an essay in the fall semester of their first year on campus. Students complete the essay in November at the end of a one credit course - the World Studies Colloquium - that introduces new students to the program courses, goals and requirements. In the essay students describe how they intend to fulfill the goals of the program and how those goals coincide with their own for international work and study. Students who transfer into Marlboro in their sophomore year and Marlboro students who wish to transfer in the program in their sophomore year are also required to take the colloquium and submit an essay. In addition to the goals essay these students will be required to explain their plans for meeting all the WSP requirements. Transfer juniors into Marlboro will be required to take a non-credit-bearing tutorial with the Director World Studies before submitting their essay.

 Curriculum Overview

World Studies Program students are expected to gain a general education through the liberal arts and to develop skills as international citizens. These general goals include:

  • an introductory knowledge of world history and cultures;
  • an understanding of contemporary issues of global significance;
  • competence in cross-cultural communication, including proficiency in a second language, recognition of differences in cultural values, and experience working and learning in another culture;
  • a basic knowledge of one world region (geography, economic and environmental systems, culture, and history);
  • a grasp of one or more academic disciplines, and an ability to apply the concepts and methods of these disciplines to a particular problem or issue;
  • an integration of academic and experiential learning, with practical application of academic learning as part of an internship;
  • an ability to communicate clearly in writing and speaking.

 International Expertise

Students in the World Studies Program also seek international expertise as a part of their undergraduate education. Their studies include:

  • An introduction to work in international fields, through the World Studies Colloquium and other events;
  • Knowledge of world history, differences in cultural values, and global issues. An introductory background is offered in the WSP Freshman and Sophomore Seminars. Students may pursue further work in a wide range of courses.
  • Knowledge of a world region. The goal is to learn how to develop a functional knowledge of a region and how different disciplines contribute to an understanding of the multiple dimensions of a single region. Skills in learning about any region can be applied to the area where an internship is located.
  • Contemporary issues of global significance. Students are expected to develop an understanding of contemporary issues and phenomena which have global impact, at least in the area of the student’s individual interest. Faculty sponsors of senior year work are encouraged to include in the final evaluation process some exercise insuring that the student considers the global context of his or her work.
  • Second Language Proficiency. Languages are essential to international work, and WSP students are encouraged to pursue language study throughout their education to discover the significance of language, to learn the skills of language acquisition, and to develop proficiency. Students are required to achieve functional proficiency in at least one language other than their native language. In applying for Plan work, students will review progress in language acquisition with the Plan sponsor and plan any additional language study to prepare for internship, Plan work, and the language proficiency requirement.
  • Access to an international campus. WSP students take a graduate-level course at the SIT Graduate Institute with permission of the instructor. They are also encouraged to participate in networking, social, and extra-curricular academic activities on this internationally oriented campus.

 The Internship Process

The WSP internship, which comprises a major part of the Plan of Concentration, is the means by which ideas and theories studied in the classroom are put to the test of practice and experience in the “real” world. The internship is required of all WSP students and is normally undertaken during the second semester of the junior year. Students live and work in a culture other than their own for 6-8 months. Interns work beside the people of the host country and learn first-hand about their cultural values. At the same time, they develop a greater understanding of themselves as cultural beings. They gain professional skills, improve foreign language proficiency, and gain field experience to incorporate into their academic work during the senior year.

Students design their own internships to fit their individual needs. They conduct the internship search with guidance from faculty and staff. They generally seek positions with organizations doing work in a field related to their academic discipline and to the career they hope to pursue.

Preparation for the internship usually begins in the second semester of the sophomore year, with the selection of an academic discipline and Plan sponsor. The student-sponsor relationship is the keystone for a successful internship. Working in close cooperation the student and sponsor begin to identify long-term learning goals, needed skills and academic preparation for field work and a Plan of Concentration in the chosen discipline.

Two required courses, Finding an Internship and Research Methods, provide the basic preparation for internship. Finding an Internship includes self-assessment of skills and interests, resume writing, interview skills, identification of potential overseas employers, setting goals that grow out of intellectual interests, and writing proposals to fund overseas study.

In the semester before their internship, students must work closely with faculty sponsors in pre-internship tutorials. This requirement can be met in one of two ways:

  1. A one-credit tutorial with the primary faculty sponsor focusing on internship goals and projects and background readings on the internship site.
  2. One credit’s worth of work on internship goals, projects, and background readings folded into an existing tutorial with the primary faculty sponsor. The faculty sponsor must so notify the Director of International Services of World Studies.

In Research Methods, the student writes an internship proposal demonstrating a solid knowledge of the area of the world and the academic discipline in which the student expects to work. Working closely with the Plan sponsor and the Director of International Services, the student establishes learning objectives, designs field projects, and chooses appropriate methodologies to support academic, personal, and professional goals.

While abroad, interns produce independent study projects for which they receive a semester’s worth of credit (12-18 per semester). They are expected to keep in touch with faculty sponsors through monthly submissions of work in progress. In addition, they send back to the Director of International Services three self-evaluations.

Students participating in WSP internships will receive progress grades for all tutorials undertaken during the internship semester. Academic credit for the internship will be awarded at the end of the semester but the letter grade will take the place of a progress grade on a student’s transcript only when the 6-month internship experience is completed. Progress grades must be replaced by letter grades no later than the first faculty meeting of the following semester. The progress grades of students who do not complete their internships remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

 Assessing Readiness for Internship

In addition to an approved Internship Proposal, the following factors demonstrate a student’s readiness to take on the unique challenges that present themselves on internship:

  • good academic standing,
  • awareness of how to maintain health, safety, and well-being,
  • history of working well independently and meeting deadlines,
  • successful completion of internship preparation courses,
  • written job description or some other form of demonstrated understanding by host organization of intern’s role there,
  • adequate orientation to the host country including:
    • knowledge of the language
    • familiarity with the cultural values
    • familiarity with current political and social issues as seen from within the culture
    • interview of a “cultural mentor”

Experience has shown that a number of components contribute to success on internship: preparation, realistic expectations, focused independent projects that are accomplishable in the field, placement in an organization that is related to the student’s Plan of Concentration, regular submission of work to faculty sponsors, and an ability to monitor one’s own progress.

The Program may recommend postponing the internship for the student who needs more time to meet the above criteria.

 WSP Plan of Concentration

Like all Marlboro students, WSP students pursue advanced study in a discipline and independent work addressing a particular issue or set of issues in a field. A WSP Plan of Concentration follows Marlboro guidelines, with these distinctions:

  • A Plan topic with an international or cross-cultural dimension.
  • An internship in another culture, usually for the second semester of the junior year. Internships are intended to provide experiential learning in relation to the general direction of the student’s Plan of Concentration, with these additional guidelines:
    • The internship situation must involve frequent contact and cooperative work with host-country nationals.
    • The internship situation should involve structured activity and some supervision by a resource person in the student’s field of interest.
    • The internship situation ideally includes some contribution or service to the host community.

Re-entry from internship to academic work in the senior year is addressed in a seven-week Senior Seminar. Among the tasks of the seminar is the completion of a statement reconciling the differences between the internship proposal and what the student actually accomplished and documenting the achievement of program goals with respect to the internship. WSP seniors are strongly encouraged to offer a public lecture to build their own presentation skills and to contribute to education on international affairs in the community.

World Studies Program students earn a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in International Studies, awarded by Marlboro College in association with the SIT Graduate Institute.

 Language Requirement

Competence in a foreign language is an integral part of the World Studies Program. To fulfill the World Studies Program language requirement, students must do one of the following:

  1. Pass an oral proficiency exam in a foreign language at the intermediate or advanced level as measured by ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Students must pass the oral proficiency exam one month prior to their graduation date. Testing is arranged through the international office by request of the student.
  2. Successfully complete intermediate (second-year) language study. At least two semesters of this work must occur at Marlboro and must conclude with a grade no lower than a B.

Detours

(a mostly random selection of Marlboro microdestinations)